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Rachel-K
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Three Seconds: Part Two

 

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

 

What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters?

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

 

What does it tell us about Piet that he knows so much about prisons and the life inside and around them?

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I am still unsure of whom Piet/Paula really is because he seems to have unexpected skills and knowledge. He adapts so easily that it would seem plausible to me to discover that he is some kind of a government agent, as well, rather than a criminal agent for the police. I keep wondering if he has another role to play that we don't yet know about. How did he get these additional skills and information?

 


Rachel-K wrote:

 

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I don't think that Piet even knows who the real Piet Hoffmann is, anymore. The lines have blurred so significantly that when he is arrested, he seems to have transformed completely into the Paula persona.

The brutality of the police, when arresting him, even though he put up no fight, was particulary disturbing to me. I know he was supposed to have attacked the police in the past, but still, their behavior was reprehensible. After reading interviews of the authors and learning that much of the information in the novel is based on facts, I was even more horrified. I hope that the Swedish police are not as corrupt as they seemed when they arrested Piet. The officers turned a blind eye to his beating even though their job is to uphold the law not break it!


Rachel-K wrote:
edited by twj....
....Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

 

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literature
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 

I know that Hugo is not a posted thread, but I see something developing here.  Maybe I'm looking too deeply into this, who knows, but we have two authors who write so tightly so why would they so matter of factly write in this dialog from Hugo.

 

As I mentioned in an earlier post, what is the importance of Hugo's red plastic fire engine being in the driveway when Piet arrives home? It was mentioned twice already.  Well, Piet finally hits it when pulling into the driveway but manages to sort of fix it up, hoping that Hugo doesn't notice the pretty obvious repair job. 

Hugo's role seems to be building now and he is quite the observant little person.  On page 157, when Piet is talking to Zofia, Hugo asks "Why are you angry with each other?"  On page 166, after Piet picks up the sick boys from the nursery school and Hugo realizes his father is not driving in the direction towards home, "Where are we going?"  On page 168 when Piet took the sick boys to his office and is diligently hiding the amphetamines in the inside spline of the books, "What are you doing, Daddy"?  On page 169, while Paula is still working on hiding the amphetamines in the books and has the tiny tins out with the amphetamines, "What's that?..."What is that, Daddy"? and then again just after that "There's two letters there, daddy.  What are they to?..But they've got names on....What do they say?...That's mommy's name.  On the white one.  It looks like it.  And the one on the brown one starts with an E.  I can see that too."  Piet answers him with "Ewert.  His name's Ewert."  Whatever possessed him to say the name "Ewert"?  Hugo will remember this name and at some point Hugo is going to let slip the name of "Ewert".   Then on page 171, when Piet takes the boys with him to the LINDSTROM apartment for a meeting with Wilson and introduces Wilson to the boys as "Uncle Erik."  Here again, Hugo is going to remember this name and this is his father's connection to the police.  Paula is so precise and in control with all details, but lets his armour down when with Hugo.

Roslund and Helstrom have very neatly written in these observations by Hugo and I think they will somehow reveal themselves later on.  I can't figure out the red plastic fire engine, though, and how it will come into play.  Unless it's going to be used to hide something in it.

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Zofia is an enigma to me. She is non communicative. Her character has not been developed. Her job has not been explored. Their relationship has not been explored. We know Piet worships her and she worships her children. We know she somehow saved him from his drug addiction.

Her reaction to the knowledge of what her husband was preparing to do was without passion. We don't even know how she really feels about it. We do know that her silence is somewhat indicative of her displeasure because of other incidents, but that is it. So, really, I still haven't got the foggiest idea about who Zofia is, as a person.


Rachel-K wrote:

edited by twj...

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

 

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Erik Wilson surprised me. At first I thought that he was a cold and calculating police officer, simply using Piet to accomplish his goal and then would throw him to the wolves. However, he got very attached to Piet and almost ruined "his own mission" by offering him a way out if he wanted to take it, so later, I felt that he was far more compassionate than I had originally thought. He genuinely seemed to care about Piet and insisted that he inform his wife and again offered him the opportunity to abort. He showed up at the prison to make sure Piet was all right and witnessed his abusive treatment. I wonder, in the next part, will he risk his own reputation and career to help him?

 

Piet's elaborate plans before he entered the prison, made me wonder if he was planning to betray Erik. He said he prepared two letters that would never be sent...so...why did he prepare them? I am wondering if Erik has made an error in judgment and trusted the wrong informant!

 


Rachel-K wrote:

edited by twj:

What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters?

 

 

 

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corky200
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

With the blending of both sides of the characters, how can we ever be sure if justice will be served?
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BookWoman718
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two


thewanderingjew wrote:

Zofia is an enigma to me. She is non communicative. Her character has not been developed. Her job has not been explored. Their relationship has not been explored. We know Piet worships her and she worships her children. We know she somehow saved him from his drug addiction.

Her reaction to the knowledge of what her husband was preparing to do was without passion. We don't even know how she really feels about it. We do know that her silence is somewhat indicative of her displeasure because of other incidents, but that is it. So, really, I still haven't got the foggiest idea about who Zofia is, as a person.


 I have an almost identical reaction to Zofia.  I don't have any clear picture of her at all.  We see more of the little boys, but they of course are simply ordinary children.  They get sick and fussy;  they are curious;  they can be distracted by a TV movie;  and above all, their needs can come at the most inconvenient times.  But we love them more than life itself.  So far, for me, Piet's family is a part of the setting, rather than a character.  They exist to show us his softer side, and we experience them entirely from Piet's point of view.  If Rachel asked us to speculate on how Zofia behaves at work, I wouldn't even have a starting point. 
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BookWoman718
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two


Rachel-K wrote:

 

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

 


 

Piet was even more sophisticated than I had expected.   He was so methodical when the murder went down in the first section that we knew that part of his nature, but his preparation for entering prison was amazing, even though one didn't know quite how he expected all the parts to fall into place.  The tiny revolver is a way to smuggle in protection - more effective than filing down spoons or toothbrushes.  The description of creating tiny hiding places in books was utterly enthralling.  (I did wonder, though, if items requested by prisoners are not routinely X-rayed in Sweden.  I am under the impression that they are here.  We X-ray items going into airplanes and courthouses, and any other place we think there could be a threat;  surely prisons are a logical place to be equally vigilant?)  I had no idea why he needed explosives, but I assumed the drugs will be used in his takeover of that business in the prison.  Surrounded by so many addicts, there would always be a way to make good use of a drug stash.   He's also setting up his "insurance" and his eventual release and disappearance.  He can control every detail (or so he thinks) except Zofia's reaction. 

 

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high96
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

 

Piet's elaborate plans before he entered the prison, made me wonder if he was planning to betray Erik. He said he prepared two letters that would never be sent...so...why did he prepare them? I am wondering if Erik has made an error in judgment and trusted the wrong informant!

 



 

I think he prepared them as insurance in case he doesn't make it out of the prison alive. They are for the worst-case scenario. One was to Zofia with the 950,000 kronor and the recording which would let her live comfortably and know what he was doing and that it was Government-sanctioned despite what the government may deny later; and one was to Ewert Grens. Erik had told Piet that Grens was the investigator for the murder at Vastmannagatan 79 and that

 

"..he's good. And that makes me uneasy."

"He's ...he's the sort that doesn't give up."

 

So maybe the envelope to Grens, which we know contains the recording guaranteeing his pardon and eventual relocation for going through with the operation, is Piet's way of clearing his name and exposing the Swedish government in the event that he dies or something goes wrong in prison. 

"I don't like secrets! All this cooking, and reading, and TV watching, while we... read and cook! It's like you're involving me in crime, and I let you! Why do I let you?" --Emile in "Ratatouille"
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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Well, yes, I think it was insurance and I suppose Piet really believes he will get out alive and be able to eliminate "Paula" from his life, since he has prepared such an elaborate escape route in the event the system betrays him.

I think I really want him to survive and go back to the idyllic life he "seemed" to have with Zofia and the boys. However, who is Zofia, really? we know so little about her. Yet, it would be nice to know that someone made it out of the corrupt system "alive", after being so used.

The book makes me wonder about where fault lies when someone chooses a life of crime. I found it odd that, at times, I would sympathize with the criminal and not the authorities put in place to protect me. They seemed so without moral grounding, so self serving.The authors did a great job.

Who makes the criminal? I know some people may be innately evil, but some turn to a life of crime in order to survive. The who, what, why and where lines, blurred for me in this book.



thewanderingjew wrote: Piet's elaborate plans before he entered the prison, made me wonder if he was planning to betray Erik. He said he prepared two letters that would never be sent...so...why did he prepare them? I am wondering if Erik has made an error in judgment and trusted the wrong informant!
high96 wrote:I think he prepared them as insurance in case he doesn't make it out of the prison alive. They are for the worst-case scenario. One was to Zofia with the 950,000 kronor and the recording which would let her live comfortably and know what he was doing and that it was Government-sanctioned despite what the government may deny later; and one was to Ewert Grens. Erik had told Piet that Grens was the investigator for the murder at Vastmannagatan 79 and that

"..he's good. And that makes me uneasy."

"He's ...he's the sort that doesn't give up."

 So maybe the envelope to Grens, which we know contains the recording guaranteeing his pardon and eventual relocation for going through with the operation, is Piet's way of clearing his name and exposing the Swedish government in the event that he dies or something goes wrong in prison. 


 

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skibaer
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

What happened between Piet and Zofia was not a t all what I expected. I agree with the other posters. She hasn't been developed at all. She has gone from what I thought was a very important character to almost an afterthought. I wonder if that will change.

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high96
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 


Rachel-K wrote:

 

 

 

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

 

 


 

He has set up 2 envelopes to help in clearing his name and taking care of his family in the worst case.

 

He has loaded his tulips with meth and had them scheduled to be delivered to the prison warden in order to get some meth into the prison. 

 

He has loaded library books with amphetamine, a gun, explosive, detonator, fuse and a receiver. He has returned these books to the library that supplies the prisoners with reading material.

 

He has attached transmitters to the railings of the church balcony which overlooks the prison yard and barred windows of the prison. 

 

He has used a rangefinder to find the distance and calculate the time it would take a bullet to get from the church tower's balcony to a point behind the workshop window in the prison......3 seconds.

 

He has buried his cell phone and thus his contact with his handler, Wilson at a place he could retrieve it from if he breaks out of prison. 

 

He has remembered what it is like to be in prison and how he hates it. I feel this was necessary in preparing himself to mentally switch over to being the hardened criminal we see arrested at the end of this section. 

 

He has told his wife what is going on. 

 

With all these preparations, it appears that he is going to cause a riot of some sort. The transmitters in the church tower and the determination of how long a bullet would take to hit someone through the workshop window suggests a police SWAT team firing at him (or the perp of the riot). The transmitters would allow him to hear what the police in the tower are saying through his receiver smuggled in the library book. I think he is going to cause an explosion inside the prison.  The envelopes are to clear his name through an investigation that Grens will not give up on due do his determination to clear cases and doggedness to right the wrongs...extract justice for victims. 

 

The cell phone is for contacting Erik when he is able to again. 

"I don't like secrets! All this cooking, and reading, and TV watching, while we... read and cook! It's like you're involving me in crime, and I let you! Why do I let you?" --Emile in "Ratatouille"
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nfam
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I can't say my view of the characters has changed. I still like Piet. His careful planning seems a good trait when he's involved in something so dangerous. I also like Erick. He seems genuinely interested in the welfare of Piet. 

 

Zofia is still a mystery. She seems very distant from Piet, almost as though she doesn't quite know who is is and whether she loves him. I will be interested to see whether she actually has a role later in the novel. I actually like the boys better than their mother. Hugo in particular seems to be quite a character. He's responding the way I'd expect a small boy to respond. 

 

It will be interesting to see how this novel ends. I expect great things of Piet. He seems to have a healthy desire to rely on himself and not trust others too far. 

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dhaupt
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Wow, part two was amazing and if the rest of the novel is as surprising as this one we are in for one heck of a ride.

 

Now on to Rachel's questions

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

We do indeed get a much closer look at Piet in this part, what I have learned here is that he is a very calculating man and very meticulous in his planning and I get the impression that he thinks that things are going to go very wrong once he steps into prison.

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

My heart was just racing during his planning stages and I found myself getting very anxious about all the minute details he was seeing to.

 

What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters?

Very good question Rachel, what I learned in these chapters was that Erik does really care about Piet more than he thinks he should and he's constantly trying in a cagy manner to talk him out of this operation.

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

Yes I did get a clearer picture and I don't think Zofia had a clue about what was going on, however the tiny little clue that Piet gave us about when he met her leads me to believe that it was during his drug rehabilitation on the top of page 138 "The rehab center, the fear, the prison sentence, the drug had been all-consuming and everything else meaningless until the morning she was suddenly standing in front of him. He had never injected since. She had forced him to hold onto her hand, as only people who trust each other can."

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

This is a very interesting question and it made me think hard about the answer and in my opinion the Piet that was arrested that Friday morning was the man that Piet used to be, not an act but a remembrance of his past.

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dhaupt
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Zofia is an enigma to me. She is non communicative. Her character has not been developed. Her job has not been explored. Their relationship has not been explored. We know Piet worships her and she worships her children. We know she somehow saved him from his drug addiction.

Her reaction to the knowledge of what her husband was preparing to do was without passion. We don't even know how she really feels about it. We do know that her silence is somewhat indicative of her displeasure because of other incidents, but that is it. So, really, I still haven't got the foggiest idea about who Zofia is, as a person.


Rachel-K wrote:

edited by twj...

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

 

 

 


Great points twj, but I'm wondering if that is part of the authors' magic in keeping us all reading forward. I have a suspicion that we will learn more about her in the future, or maybe not, maybe she'll always be like looking at a ghost.

 

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mv5ocean
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

He is still intent on following through with the ordeal and is completely focused on that, even to the extent of involving his family, especially carting the boys around while sick. I do believe that it is even more apparent when the statement was made that he had lied to them about everything for years.  I believe he realizes if he has any chance to make it work in the future he has to completely start a relationship with his entire family over at that time.

 

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

I believe he is certain that he will be responsible for saving his own life and he absolutely has distrust for everyone.  It is made even more clear that no matter who says "I have your back" that he does not believe for one second that anyone actually will.

 

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

I still have confusion about Zofia. It seems as though she is "stoic" for lack of a better word when advised of the life of lies. I can't figure out if that is because she is simply in shock or does she lead a double life of her own. I truly believe this is the character that is going to amaze us!

 

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

I almost feel that at this point he has used all knowledge available to him to simply play a character that will ultimately save his life and possibly give him an opportunity to reestablish a family at some time.  He is trying to win an "Oscar" for his performance as he realizes he must perform perfectly.


 

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MomOf2Turds
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

I find him to be more detail oriented than I originally thought.  He is so methodical in everything he did to prepare for his upcoming stint in prison.  He made sure that all of his bases were covered.  He made sure that he prepared for each and every potential eventuality.  I still have not changed my opinion of him.  I still think he is a stand-up guy (although he hasn't always been that way, he was reformed, grew, he learned from his mistakes and vowed not to make them again) who is doing what he can to make sure that his wife and children are safe and well taken are of.

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

The pace slows down, but the tension rises.  At least it did for me.  The pace was a lot slower as he was preparing to go to jail.  But the tension got greater as he was making all of the preparations.  He had to be so thorough and so precise in such a short amount of time.  He had so much to do, and so little time to do it in.  And if he was unable to get everything done before his time was up, he would not be covered from every angle.  He has prepared for every eventuality, as far as I can see, and making sure that he did so in thirty-eight hours.  Less than two full days.  But because of his attention to detail, he was able to pull it off without appearing to outwardly stressed.  But you could sense his stress on the inside, through his dialogue, through his thoughts, and that is what raised the tension for me, and also slowed the pace.

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

I'm not sure what some of the plans were for, such as the transmitters on the outside of the railing at the church.  The tulips with the drugs in them, I wasn't real sure of their fate.  But then again, I'm pretty naive when it comes to drugs.  So anyway, I could pretty uch see the end result of his other plans though.  Those two were the main ones that kinda threw me for a loop, and still kinda do.

 

What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters?

We learn that he has a deeper feeling for Piet.  It goes beyond the fact that Piet is the best infiltrator that they have had to date.  He genuinely cares what happens to him and feels bad that he can't do anything other than offer him an out.  He wants the bust, but he also wants Piet to be safe and happy with his family, which Erik doesn't have and sometimes wishes that he did.  He's not the total hard hearted guy that he wants everyone to think that he is.

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

I feel that she is a person that turns her anger inward instead of talking about it and letting it out.  She would rather keep her thoughts and feelings to herself so that she doesn't speak or act out of anger and regret it, like so many people do.  She wants to work it out within herself before she reacts.

 

What does it tell us about Piet that he knows so much about prisons and the life inside and around them?

He didn't just do his time there.  He learned.  He paid attention.  He didn't want to go back.  He tried to remember all of the details so that they could serve as a reminder as to why he wanted to change his life, and never return.

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

I don't believe so.  I believe the real Piet Hoffmann is worried about what he is going to find at home when he comes home at the end of his "workday."  They arrested the Piet Hoffmann that he is portraying when he is in his Paula persona.

 

“A home without books is a body without soul.” ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero
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Deltadawn
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified? In this section we really get into Piet's head and heart. He is so devoted to his wife and children and is so torn up about what he is going to do and his impending separation from them.  That being said, both personally and professionally, he really feels, at the end of the day, that he himself is the only person that he can trust and rely on. And we see his resourcefulness and skills at work as he meticulously prepares himself for this assignment.  Then we see him slip (seemingly easily) into the Paula persona when he is arrested.

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

I believe that Piet is planning for all possible outcomes in these chapters. He's setting himself up for the role he will "play" in jail, he's prepared letters and documents in case things go wrong (for Zofia and Ewert), and he's prepared the ultimate way out for himself if need be.


What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters?

Erik is much more emotionally invested to Piet, his well being and his family than I originally believed.


Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

 

As others have stated, I do not feel that I know Zofia much better as a person. She did not react to Piet's revelation except through silence. This may be a reflection of her personality - or perhaps there is something more to it. Is she in horrified shock to discover what he has been involved in all those years? Does she feel betrayed? Is she overcome with worry? Or, as some others have suggested, does she perhaps have secrets of her own? 


What does it tell us about Piet that he knows so much about prisons and the life inside and around them? Well, we know that he has been to prison.  We also know that he is very resourceful, observant, and  and he is a survivor. I am intrigued by the idea of what one person said that perhaps he also has another role and is working for the government on yet another level....

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

 

I don't believe that they arrested the "real" Piet. I believe the "real" Piet is the one who adores and yearns for his wife and children. However, he is a complex character - and as someone else stated in another post, the lines are blurred and it isn't so simple to determine who the "real" Piet Hoffman is - he himself is not sure who he really is. He seems to transition easily, at least on the surface, between Piet and Paula.   I believe that as he progresses through his assignment/ordeal in prison, and as we progress through the novel, we will get a more solid answer to the question of who the real Piet Hoffman is.


 

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MomOf2Turds
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 


high96 wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

 

Piet's elaborate plans before he entered the prison, made me wonder if he was planning to betray Erik. He said he prepared two letters that would never be sent...so...why did he prepare them? I am wondering if Erik has made an error in judgment and trusted the wrong informant!

 



 

I think he prepared them as insurance in case he doesn't make it out of the prison alive. They are for the worst-case scenario. One was to Zofia with the 950,000 kronor and the recording which would let her live comfortably and know what he was doing and that it was Government-sanctioned despite what the government may deny later; and one was to Ewert Grens. Erik had told Piet that Grens was the investigator for the murder at Vastmannagatan 79 and that

 

"..he's good. And that makes me uneasy."

"He's ...he's the sort that doesn't give up."

 

So maybe the envelope to Grens, which we know contains the recording guaranteeing his pardon and eventual relocation for going through with the operation, is Piet's way of clearing his name and exposing the Swedish government in the event that he dies or something goes wrong in prison. 


I completely agree that it is insurance.  I don't think that he made the letters to never ben sent.  I think that he made them in case he was found out in prison so that both Grens and Zofia could do what they needed to do with the information contained in the letters and envelopes to make sure that the proper things are done to ensure that they all know just why everything happened, and what he was doing.  Grens is the investigating officer and would need to know what really happened and why so that he could close the case with a big fat "solved" stamped on it.  Zofia is given the same recording so that it would reinforce the fact that he was working with the police to help make the world a better place for his family and that he was supposed to be protected and kept safe.  It also includes the money so that if he doesn't make it out alive she and the boys would be taken care of.  They would have enough money to make a fresh start.

 

“A home without books is a body without soul.” ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero