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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Piet is a man with at least two faces. This section clearly shows the criminal side. The last line of this section says it all when it says that only a criminal can play a criminal. It was like we were seeing a totally different man, yet it is the same type of man who could let someone else die. I wasn't sure what horrified him more about the murder in the first section - the actual death or the possibility of his own death. Now I think it was his personal connection to death. He is ruthless in the way he prepares for his incarceration, planning everything with pin point accuracy and precision. Piet has information that no normal person should have - the history of the library books, how to get into the tower unobserved, how to hide nitroglycerine and detonation cords, etc. He is able to get his hands on dangerous stuff and then brings it home where his family could be in danger. He cut and sold drugs again. Everything is done like he has done it before, maybe many times before. I don't know if he can leave this life of crime even when he seems to want to for his family. Did the police arrest the "real" Piet? Yes, sadly I think they did. I think he is in so deep that he won't be able to get out, but I sure hope I am wrong!

 

Zofia surprised me by not saying anything when he told her the truth. I don't know what I expected, but her silence wasn't it. I think she knew something was going on, but this is far worse than most of us would have expected. I think she is preparing for life without Piet.

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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DSaff
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I agree about the fire engine and its relationship to his family. He can put all the repairs he wants on it, but it is still broken. Looks can be, and are in this case, very deceiving.

 


MomOf2Turds wrote:

 


literature wrote:

 

Roslund and Helstrom have very neatly written in these observations by Hugo and I think they will somehow reveal themselves later on.  I can't figure out the red plastic fire engine, though, and how it will come into play.  Unless it's going to be used to hide something in it.


I believe that the red plastic fire engine is not going to be used to hide something in it.  I don't think it is going to come into play at all.  I think it is more of a symbol of Piet's family life.  It was all nice and pretty and in pristine condition before he ran over it and broke it.  Which mirrors his home life.  It was a wonderful life, the perfect life, until he told his wife what he was really doing, how he had been lying to her, and broke it.  He hopes that he will be able to fix it so that it still works and isn't noticeably marred by the tires on his car.  What I see there is he is hoping that once he achieves his goal of helping the police bring down the Polish Mafia, he can go back home to his family and everything will be as it was before without the cracks and such from his lies.  He hopes to rebuild everything in his life with his family.

 


 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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mommybooknerd
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Well put about the fire truck...it actually made me sad how that happened, but Piet did take his kids to some locations when they were sick that was not so great either...I like Piet and that just shows how detemined he is to finish what he started, but too bad his family is the one getting hurt over it!

 

 


DSaff wrote:

I agree about the fire engine and its relationship to his family. He can put all the repairs he wants on it, but it is still broken. Looks can be, and are in this case, very deceiving.

 


You are the author of your own life story.
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mommybooknerd
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I reallly feel that Piet was a criminal but is using what he learned to do good, but it is family that is ones that gets hurt.  I really think that Piet is a good guy overall and loves his family but his past caught up to him and he made a promise that he intended to keep.  Maybe it was his way to redeem himself for what he did in the past...he must forgive himself...but his criminal mind is what keeps in a float for the most part...

You are the author of your own life story.
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MSaff
Posts: 272
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

Hell Again Everyone,

 

  What I found in Part Two was Piet Hoffmann, getting ready to go to prison.  He was making last arrangements for what I thought was the care of his wife and children, yet I couldn't do what he was doing or about to do.  The hole section described some measures being taken by a desperate man.  He was preparing for the inevitable time in prison. 

  The way he researched books he must have known were not ordinarily checked out from the library, in order to get his contraband inside, was ingenious, although disturbing as he used literature in ways that are inexcusable.  The cutting up of books is beyond comprehension. 

  I still think that Piet is a bad man.  He is using the Police as well as being used by the Police.  What bothers me is how the Police allow him to conduct his own drug business, aside from that where the Police are setting up the Polish Mafia.  I don't trust him, nor do I trust the Police authorities.  Once inside the prison, if found out, he will be a dead man.  Even isolation probably won't save him. 

  The pace of the book is now picking up.  I believe that we have met most of the characters, and now we will be getting more story.  I'm still wondering if any of this story is based on truth, or is it embellished for the sake of literary guise.

 

  Piet's wife Zofia, I still haven't quite figured out yet.  I do believe that she had at least a clue as to what Piet had been up to, although I figure that she just thought he was still in the drug trade, not working with the Police.  When Piet finally tells her what he is about to do, she stays completely silent.  Most people I know, would blow a gasket, if they were to find out that their spouse was dealing with the Mafia/Police at the same time, and then to hear that they are about to go to prison to continue working for the Police, is stranger yet.  What I'm wondering is whether she and the children will still be there, if Piet gets out of the prison in one piece.

 

  Finally, I believe that when the Police arrest Piet, he is showing the man he really is, or was.  You can't fake something quite like that and be believable, unless you have those tendencies already.

 


Rachel-K wrote:

 

 

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters?

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?


 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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mlfoley012
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I found Piet's preparation in this section pretty fascinating.  I can't wait to see how it all comes together.  I believe there is much more to learn about him. Perhaps it's more than just a double life. I really enjoyed section two!

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pen21
Posts: 3,648
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

 


MSaff wrote:

Hell Again Everyone,

 

  What I found in Part Two was Piet Hoffmann, getting ready to go to prison.  He was making last arrangements for what I thought was the care of his wife and children, yet I couldn't do what he was doing or about to do.  The hole section described some measures being taken by a desperate man.  He was preparing for the inevitable time in prison. 

  The way he researched books he must have known were not ordinarily checked out from the library, in order to get his contraband inside, was ingenious, although disturbing as he used literature in ways that are inexcusable.  The cutting up of books is beyond comprehension. 

  I still think that Piet is a bad man.  He is using the Police as well as being used by the Police.  What bothers me is how the Police allow him to conduct his own drug business, aside from that where the Police are setting up the Polish Mafia.  I don't trust him, nor do I trust the Police authorities.  Once inside the prison, if found out, he will be a dead man.  Even isolation probably won't save him. 

  The pace of the book is now picking up.  I believe that we have met most of the characters, and now we will be getting more story.  I'm still wondering if any of this story is based on truth, or is it embellished for the sake of literary guise.

 

  Piet's wife Zofia, I still haven't quite figured out yet.  I do believe that she had at least a clue as to what Piet had been up to, although I figure that she just thought he was still in the drug trade, not working with the Police.  When Piet finally tells her what he is about to do, she stays completely silent.  Most people I know, would blow a gasket, if they were to find out that their spouse was dealing with the Mafia/Police at the same time, and then to hear that they are about to go to prison to continue working for the Police, is stranger yet.  What I'm wondering is whether she and the children will still be there, if Piet gets out of the prison in one piece.

 

  Finally, I believe that when the Police arrest Piet, he is showing the man he really is, or was.  You can't fake something quite like that and be believable, unless you have those tendencies already.


 

Very well said. This section had so much packed into so few pages.

We see the other side of Piet, the prisoner side. Piet is trying to be as prepares as is possible. How could he think of so many things so quickly.  Piet is being used by the police and I think Piet knows the police feel he is expendable, that the police are using him for their benefit. I do wonder if the police know about his side drug business.

I to think that Zofia knows something about Piet's life, maybe not everything, but she had to suspect.

Can't wait to read the next section.

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Passie71
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎11-03-2010

Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified?

Hoffmann is a very interesting man.  He is torn between being the good guy and the bad guy.  I think he would really like to be a good guy and get out of his past life with drugs, prison and cops.  Hoffman would love to be the husband and father his family deserves.

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages? 

Very high tension in Part II.  It had me reading like crazy to see what he was going to do next.

 

 

What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters?

Wilson wants to be know as a real bad, tough as nail cop, but he shows his softer side to Hoffman and starts to treat him like a real human being instead of his pawn.  He states it was the first time asking one of this informants if this is really what he wants to do.  I like this side of him and the other personal touches the author shares about all of the characters.

 

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person?

Not as this time.  It seems she likes to "turn a blind eye" to the situation but yet is still there at the house and wanting to talk to Hoffman but can't seem to do it yet.

 

What does it tell us about Piet that he knows so much about prisons and the life inside and around them?

Piet has lead a life of crime and has served some hard time and been involved with some really rough people.  His own family life was very difficult.

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann?

I am not sure.  He is "real" in the sense of who he WAS but not who he wants to be.

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LorettaP
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

The more I read about Piet I think that maybe Erik picked the wrong guy. His real offenses prior to becoming an informant would not have given him as much criminal knowledge that he displays in part two. Perhaps he learned a good bit in prison when he was incarcerated for the first time. I am anxious to read about what Piets hidden agenda is. To find out why he is so willing to risk so much. As a few others have already said I do not think Piet Hoffman even know what or who is real anymore. Erik should have tried harder to convince him to stop being Paula and to relocate somewhere safe.

 

I still have no understanding of who Zofia is. I wish her character was a little more involved in the plot. Hopefully later in the book we get to learn more about her and why she stays.

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JoanieGranola
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎11-11-2009

Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

We get a much closer look at Piet Hoffmann in the brief days that make up Part Two of Three Seconds. What do we learn about him? Have your ideas about him changed or solidified? Piet is a very confused individual. I'm standing by my statement in Part 1 regarding his being an agent for some other organization -- because he has such sharp skills as a criminal while working as in infiltrator, I believe that he's a mole for another police agency or the Swedish government. I've never really had an opinion about Piet and it hasn't really changed much in Part 2. I think he's a very interesting character and I can't wait to see what unfolds.

 

We get a very detailed description of the progress of Piet's methodical action, without being given any explanations of what he's up to. Even when we "hear" his thinking, we get only small cryptic thoughts without knowing how to interpret them. What happens to the pace and the tension in the novel in these pages?  Oh, the pace and tension is definitely escalating in Part 2. I have a feeling we're all (those who haven't finished the book by now) going to be on pins and needles in Part 3, and we'll not be able to put the book down until it's finished. Since we know there are two "twists" coming up, I think many (I'm definitely one of them) will be trying to predict what Piet's future holds.

 

Can you discern any of the intention of Piet's careful planning in these chapters? I admit, I'm totally confused about Piet's intentions. I can certainly undertand that he's definitely planning for a new life when he escapes. What I don't understand is the communication device he planted in the church. I also don't understand his "obsession" (for lack of a better word) with his recording with the police. Again, I understand that it's all relative to when he gets released from prison, but there seems to be more to that story than just security.

 

What do we learn about Erik Wilson in these chapters? We learn that Erik cares for Piet as a person and is trying to protect him. I find it interesting that he tries to get Piet to walk away. Erik himself mentions that he cares for some of his infiltrators when he knows he shouldn't, so I wonder how many others he's tried to remove from the "program." I still don't understand why Erik goes abroad to Georgia - it was said that [they] are trained abroad; but surely there must be training in Europe. Perhaps there's nothing more to it than that.

 

Do you have a clearer picture of who Zofia is as a person? I don't think so. I'm not sure if I'm surprised about her reaction or not. After reading some of the other posts, I have to say that I'm not surprised by her reaction. I said before that I believed Zofia knew more than she let on and that was proven by her thought that Piet wouldn't watch the children the next day as he stated when he got home [Friday?] evening. She knows that he puts his work before family, regardless of how much he says he loves them. She knows more than she lets on - we know that also by Piet's descriptions of how she's often silent on the phone and has her own conflict about how to react to his tardiness/absence from home and broken promises - and I think it's just a matter of time before we find out exactly how much she knows. I think she was just so disappointed with Piet that she didn't know how to react so she did what she always does -- she's silently contemplating how her future is going to turn out.

 

What does it tell us about Piet that he knows so much about prisons and the life inside and around them? We knew from the beginning that Piet was in prison in the past. We've known that he was a criminal. I predict that tThe fact that the statement "only a criminal can play a criminal" will play a huge part in our discovering exactly who Piet is. That's why I think he's a mole for a police/government agency. This sort of ties in with the infiltrator who was murdered in the beginning - stating that he was police and not being able to handle the information of his cover story and the pressure Piet put upon him during the drug meeting. It was stated that he wasn't a criminal and therefore wasn't able to truly act as a criminal. I think these sorts of statements are red herrings.

 

Is the man the police arrest in any way the "real" Piet Hoffmann? No. He's Piet playing a criminal who's going to be thrown into prison. Piet doesn't want to be Piet at this particular moment. His life hangs in the balance - both professionally and personally. He's so consummed with his inability to discern truth from lies that he's lost his true identity.


As to the red fire truck and Hugo comments, here are my thoughts: I agree with other posters that the fire truck is symoblic of Piet's life. It was all shiny and perfect, and when Piet ran it over it was a foreshadowing of what his life would become when he informed Zofia of his lies - damaged. Further foreshadowing was his trying to repair the truck so the child wouldn't notice - he wants to have everything remain perfect, regardless of his actions because he loves his family, because he wants forgiveness (because he's having a hard time forgiving himself). It's strange to me, though, that he professes this love for his wife and sons, but he consistently puts them in peril by continuing to be an infiltrator and lying to them. His actions with his sons when he removes them from daycare is appalling. I believe that if Zofia actually knew of these specific events, she would leave him for good. It think right now she's uncertain - if only because we don't know the true personality and knowledge of Zofia to what her husband is.

 

As to Hugo's importance in the remainder of the story, I don't think that's the case. I think all of the conversations between Hugo and his father are just reminders to Piet that he has these other lives that he's responsible for and he's totally messing it up by being selfish and continuing on this infiltrator journey that will put him in prison for an undetermined amount of time. This is just confirmation that his wife and his kids aren't stupid - they're going to find out what he really is (which, right now, is a liar). If Piet had no family, I'd have to say he should follow the job through to the end. But because he now has a wife and two sons - since the beginning of this career as an infiltrator - he should've walked away when he was given the chance. That would've said more about the love he has for his family than his current actions did. It's very disappointing that Piet's character is so cowardly in this respect.

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JoanieGranola
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

thewanderingjew wrote: 

I felt that the fire engine was a symbol of his distraction. He was losing his ability to identify as husband and father and was becoming more of a criminal persona in anticipation of going to prison. He wasn't thinking about his home or his children when he was in the driveway. He was preoccupied with thinking of what awaited him in a few short hours. When he realized what he had done, he tried to restore it to protect his son from finding it broken. He still loved his family. He was just moving away from them mentally and emotionally. Does anyone else agree?

 

I agree that he's distancing himself emotionally and mentally from his family. I think that, while he may love them as much as he says, this is a coping mechanism for him because of the betrayal to his family and his losing his identity as well as preparation for his entering prison. I do not believe his wife and children will visit him in prison - I don't think Zofia will leave him, but I think she'll want to keep her sons away from the father they don't really know until Piet gets out of prison and they can start over.

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JoanieGranola
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

twj wrote: 

The brutality of the police, when arresting him, even though he put up no fight, was particulary disturbing to me. I know he was supposed to have attacked the police in the past, but still, their behavior was reprehensible. After reading interviews of the authors and learning that much of the information in the novel is based on facts, I was even more horrified. I hope that the Swedish police are not as corrupt as they seemed when they arrested Piet. The officers turned a blind eye to his beating even though their job is to uphold the law not break it!

 

I'm actually not that surprised. I've seen shows about police in different countries and, apparently, European police are very corrupt. The crime is also similar but very different than in the US. While we have tons of crime, most European crime is VERY organized and quite large.

 

It was a little sad to see that Erik cared enough to see how Piet was treated when he was brought in, and I think he probably would've been better off not knowing. As far as the beating is concerned, though, I'm pretty sure it would've happend the same way over here - you have an A&D criminal mouthing off to officers and assulting them with saliva, fellow officers aren't going to "see" the prisoner get retaliated against.

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JoanieGranola
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two


chris227 wrote:

I still think that Zofia will turn into an important character.  Zofia's reaction is pretty much what I expected.  How else could a woman react to finding out that her entire life is built on lies?  She was probably in total shock and having such a mix of emotions, anger, fear, sadness, etc that she could not express herself.

 

As another poster had mentioned we know nothing about Zofia's work...maybe there is another side...perhaps she is somehow more involved in all of this conspiracy than we now know.  Maybe she actually knows more about Piet's other life than mentioned and could not tell him for fear that it would put him in further danger?

 

I can't wait to read on and find out what is going to happen next?

 

 


I'm in agreement with you. I am not surprised by Zofia's reaction. However, I've mentioned this before - I'm suspicious that Piet is indeed working for someone else. Piet mentioned that Zofia "saved him" from drugs and they met after he was released from prison. We still know practially nothing about Zofia other than she's a devoted wife and mother. I'm beginning to think that their meeting was not by chance - I'm starting to think that she was sent to him by whomever she works for, fell in love with him and they got married and had kids. Perhaps her uncommunicative nature stems from the fact that she herself is living a lie and is just as conflicted as Piet is with his betrayal. I think we're going to find out that her unemotional reaction to Piet's news is because she herself realizes that their world is unraveling and she needs to be truthful with him. Maybe she removed herself to be with her thoughts so she could prepare herself for what she was going to say to him when he got out of prison.

That's my conspiracy theory, and I'm sticking to it.

 

Lisa

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JoanieGranola
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

high96 wrote: 

With all these preparations, it appears that he is going to cause a riot of some sort. The transmitters in the church tower and the determination of how long a bullet would take to hit someone through the workshop window suggests a police SWAT team firing at him (or the perp of the riot). The transmitters would allow him to hear what the police in the tower are saying through his receiver smuggled in the library book. I think he is going to cause an explosion inside the prison.  The envelopes are to clear his name through an investigation that Grens will not give up on due do his determination to clear cases and doggedness to right the wrongs...extract justice for victims. 

 

I disagree somewhat -- I think Piet knows exactly WHO meets at the church spire, which is why he planted the wire to hear the conversations. Who those speakers are remains to be seen. I'm curious, though, as to why he was preparing for a shooting. I have a feeling that Piet may have been planning for a prison escape to do the shooting. Or perhaps he knows someone is scheduled to be at that location to be a sniper for a prisoner already incarcerated.

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mystery-woman
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I am now even more confused about Piet Hoffman.  In part one, we look at him as nothing more than a police infiltrator doing his job.  In part two, we see more of the family man.  Is Piet taking the sick Hugo and Rasmus with him out of concern, or is it more a nuisiance?  He shows some compassion for the boys, but not a lot of concern by drugging them to take them along with him to do his work.  I am not sure what exactly he is up to with the envelopes and the transmitters on the church balcony, but I'm sure it has something to do with an insurance plan against the police burning him.  I also believe Erik will be his rescuer. 

 

Zofia's existence other than to give Piet a family, at this point, I believe is just that.  She is too distant.  If my husband had told me what Piet told me, I would react totally the opposite.  This man she loves, maybe, has lied to her.  Thier entire life together is a lie, but I think my initial reaction would be rage.  I would scream and yell, then after the rage subsided, concern would kick in.  I do not understand her character at all at this point.

 

The pace of the novel is that of a roller coaster going up the hill.  You can't really see the top and where you will go over, but you know it is coming soon.  The anxiety of it keeps you glued to the book.  Part Three here I come! 

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JoanieGranola
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two


avalonpriestess wrote:

I agree with the others who have said Piet's planning is insurance.  I have to admit, I'm having a hard time following this book.  I'm not certain if it's the book itself or just the rush of the time of year.  I'm have a very difficult time just finding time to sit and read.  I read through part 2 very quickly, I think I missed a lot.  I would like to reread this book when the holidays are over.

 

Donna


It's interesting that you say this. I had a hard time getting into Part 1, but found myself very intrigued by Part 2 (which I got through much quicker than I anticipated). I found that I remembered more of what happened in Part 2 than Part 1 - probably because the story was more tense and fast-moving. Hopefully you'll be captivated by Part 3 and will be eager to finish!

 

Lisa

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literature
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Re: The "real" Piet

 


Peppermill wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

The think I found interesting, in the book, was the fact that in different countries, the infiltrators are given different names, but in Sweden, males are given female names and females are given male names.

The criminals and the police must both know that females are males and males are females. So if everyone knows this, why bother? It no longer serves to protect the infiltrator as well!


 

For me, the confusion causable by the male/female identities was well demonstrated by the authors in their writing of the book. How many of us stumbled over the identities -- at first, we didn't know or didn't think that way, but to some extent, even after we "knew." The simple assumptions we make to carry on daily life; that our eye/brain has evolved through the eons to detect and react to differences, to changes, and the effort required to side-step those quickest processes.

 

Oft times throughout I have marveled at both how easy and how difficult deception could be.  Parts I still don't believe -- like not X-raying books entering the system, let alone just flipping the pages, by either the incoming guard or the sending librarian.  Then, too, these were unusual books pulled from storage.  Why didn't a librarian notice when they were recalled so soon?  Could Piet have trusted that they even had made it back to the stacks?  Or, as someone noted, the jostling in the book drop?  Just felt as if there is a strange disconnect between the careful preparations, all packed into such a short period of time with no slip-up possible (zero defects??) and the vagaries of reality -- such as how quickly (all) tulip blossoms open at what temperatures or whether a book arrives promptly from a library supposedly accustomed to serving the prison.

 

I enjoyed the implications about the nature of Piet's self education/reading when he had been incarcerated previously.  I haven't thought through about whether it jibes with the amount of time he was supposedly held.


 

This book is very intense and has brought out the best in all of us...our thinking process is being pushed to the nth power and I'm loving every minute of it.  But I had to laugh (with you, not at you) in your post.  I thought along the same lines...what if they had more than one copy of any one of those books and he didn't get his copy, what if the book dropped or the bindings came undone and the stash fell out, if the book was misplaced, or someone else in another library reserved it and it was delivered out of the area, etc.  But in the end, it is the authors that have "control" of the situation, they are writing the story so it will work out.  Just imagine reading this book without us to discuss it with; how much would be lost. 

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lisapt
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

I think I was given a better idea of the motives behind Piet's lifestyle. I was kind of surprised that the adrenal rush was a big part of why he enjoyed his current life, because that need for that excitement didn't come through for me in the text -- maybe I missed something. If he is living off the rush of excitement, then I don't think his goal of getting a new life and settling down to normal is ever going to work. He still comes across as so very competent. It is as if he can do, or figure out anything. Very smart and clever man. I feel like I'm being set up because I know things can't go all according to his plan, but if something happens that he can't handle, I'll be pretty shocked. I'll admit to liking Wilson better after reading this section. He steps out of his role as someone who wants to bring down the drug dealers to someone who cares about Piet, and his family. Zofia still seems like a background character, like window-dressing. I'll be very interested to see how she handles the life with Piet in jail. The transformation from Piet to Paula was scary. It was unnerving to see the change.
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fordmg
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two


MomOf2Turds wrote:

 


literature wrote:

 

Roslund and Helstrom have very neatly written in these observations by Hugo and I think they will somehow reveal themselves later on.  I can't figure out the red plastic fire engine, though, and how it will come into play.  Unless it's going to be used to hide something in it.


I believe that the red plastic fire engine is not going to be used to hide something in it.  I don't think it is going to come into play at all.  I think it is more of a symbol of Piet's family life.  It was all nice and pretty and in pristine condition before he ran over it and broke it.  Which mirrors his home life.  It was a wonderful life, the perfect life, until he told his wife what he was really doing, how he had been lying to her, and broke it.  He hopes that he will be able to fix it so that it still works and isn't noticeably marred by the tires on his car.  What I see there is he is hoping that once he achieves his goal of helping the police bring down the Polish Mafia, he can go back home to his family and everything will be as it was before without the cracks and such from his lies.  He hopes to rebuild everything in his life with his family.

 


I agree, I think the truck  is a symbol of Piet's family life.  He seems to have made a mess of it.  I think he is delusional as to how much he cares for his family.  He doesn't treat his boys very well, and has been lieing to his wife for years.  He THINKS he is a dedicated husband and father, but he can't really hold up to the standard.

 

MG

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Lildove3
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Two

reality is Piet is bracing himself and his family fro when he goes to prision. Though he gives

himself up to the police it makes one wonder if the police have the right man. I, myself don't feel

I could trust Piet,he plays both sides of the fences of the police and drug business,almost gives

the impression of "good cop...bad cop." As far as Zofia, I'm really not sure who this character

not much I can say about her???