Reply
Wordsmith
Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I read because I love words. 

 

I read all genres and, in my entire life, I've only not finished one book.  I just love to read and I find something to like or think about in every book.  I don't read a book/author and compare it with another book/author, because, for me, all books are worth something all on their own.  

Inspired Contributor
Linda10
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎10-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room


Tarri wrote:

I read because I love words. 

 

I read all genres and, in my entire life, I've only not finished one book.  I just love to read and I find something to like or think about in every book.  I don't read a book/author and compare it with another book/author, because, for me, all books are worth something all on their own.  


 

Wow!  I echo you, Tarri!  Although I can't honestly say I've not finished only one book in my entire life, I agree with your sentiments.  (I usually run out of time and have to return the book to the library!)  But I figure if someone took the time to write a book and a publishing company thought it was good enough to print, then it deserves my attention.  Just like people, we may all be different; but we all have something we can offer one another.

 

I find myself thinking about a passage or a character in a book even years after I've read the book, even if it wasn't a particularly good book.  I can think of one of our First Look books that we read last year that I really did not care for very much.  But now, a year later, I'm thinking, "You know, that book was kind of neat in its own way."

 

Anyway, just wanted to let you know that I admire your track record!

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Community Room

 

 

Tarri,

 

What an admirable record. Congratulations. I wish I had your persistence. Or is it insistence? :smileyhappy:

 

I have many unfinished books in my library, probably because I am obsessive when it comes to a subject. A couple of years ago I bought lots of art books during a time I wanted to embellish my journals with some new artistic flair. Some I gave away after I only looked through them. Last year I began a charitable knitting project and bought several books on knitting, or about knitting, some of which I only glanced at, but had to have because of their ideas.

 

There is, for instance, Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, aka The Yarn Harlot, whom I love so much that I follow her on twitter; her books are so easy to read that I buy them, read two thirds of the content over coffee, then put them in my "to be read" stack for the next year. When I sort the stack I decide that I've actually read them, and they make their way into a bookcase.

 

As for fictional accounts, I've begun several of them numerous times and still haven't finished them. Ulysses by James Joyce is one of them. The Glass Bead Game by my favorite German author, Hermann Hesse, is another one. About the only genres in which I always finish reading is memoirs and travel.

 

But one thing I am totally sure of is the fact that I find something in every book to make me think. I have quotes in my reading journal from obscure little books that hang on the bottom rung of the B&N sales scale, such as "A Walk Across France," (327,360) in which the author, Miles Morland, writes:

 

"My map addiction is matched by a craving for guidebooks. We have shelves filled with Michelins, Gault-Millaus, Lonely Planets, Rough Guides, Cadogans, Companions, Blue Guides, even Fodor's and Fielding's. I have probably kept whole publishing firms afloat in hard times. Some of these guides are for places we have visited and many are for places we haven't. Just in case I like to read up about them, otherwise how will we know whether they're worth visiting?" 

 

My sentiments, exactly.


Tarri wrote:

I read because I love words. 

 

I read all genres and, in my entire life, I've only not finished one book.  I just love to read and I find something to like or think about in every book.  I don't read a book/author and compare it with another book/author, because, for me, all books are worth something all on their own.  


 

Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Yes, I never really see reading as an escape for me. Maybe the time I use to read is the escape from the daily grind and a chance to slow down some for myself. To me it is more a case of, "to indulge". I love to indulge through reading, into new worlds, new ideas, new places and faces that I can not necessarily do in my everyday life. That is why reading can be so addictive to me. I hope my own need for escaping, is not addictive! But my indulgence in reading can be addictive, I am ok with that addiction! :smileyhappy:

 


PiperMurphy wrote:

Sunltcloud wrote:

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

...

 


This is a really interesting question, and you make some valid points. I think to answer the question you have to consider what you are "escaping from" or "escaping to". I don't think that I "escape from" because whatever it is that I want to escape is still there no matter what. I can't avoid it. However, I can "escape to". I can become so consumed by a book that their world becomes mine, and when I'm finished I have to reconnect with my world. It's not something that I consciously plan to do and it doesn't happen with every book that I read. When it does happen, I know that I have read a really great book.


 

 

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Frequent Contributor
GadgetgirlKS
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎02-10-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Good news! The brown truck just delivered my book to my work. I can stop stalking the mailroom.

 

I am looking forward to the discussion.

 

Emily

Correspondent
nlsamson
Posts: 104
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Just got home from work to find that sweet sweet package sitting there just waiting for me.  What a great end to an otherwise awful day!

 

 

"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away" - unknown
Distinguished Wordsmith
aprilh
Posts: 424
Registered: ‎09-25-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I'm glad to hear you're liking "Handle with Care". It's in my to-be-read pile and I'm hoping to get to it before the summer is over. I'm really excited that you're ranking it up there with "My Sister's Keeper". Definitely my favorite of all her books!:smileyhappy:


kiakar wrote:

For the last few days, I have been totally submersed into Jodi Picoult's "Handle with care."

And like all the rest of her numerous novels it reads superbly like the rest of her books do.

She writes of controversial issues that seriously raises a few eyebrows or two.  This one is written about a mother who wanted to pursue a lawsuit that sued her gyn which was her best friend for wrongful birth because her daughter was born with the worst kind of brittle bone syndrome. Willow, the child with the disease, broke many bones each week, month and so on. And Willow's mother is suing the dr. for not telling her about the option to abort in the early stages of pregnancy. To me, this read is up there with 19 minutes and my sister's keeper.  I really think she is one of the most creative authors we have that writes fiction.


 

 
April
Frequent Contributor
artist4nature
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎09-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

What a great birthday I had - a wonderful day at the beach, chowder and clam cakes for dinner and - a present on the step when I got home.  My copy of This Unbroken Sky. Can life get any better:smileywink:

Wordsmith
Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]

artist4nature wrote:

What a great birthday I had - a wonderful day at the beach, chowder and clam cakes for dinner and - a present on the step when I got home.  My copy of This Unbroken Sky. Can life get any better:smileywink:


 

Happy Birthday
Message Edited by Tarri on 07-15-2009 04:41 PM
Wordsmith
marciliogq
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎02-22-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Read to escape

Perhaps I hadn't been so clear in my explanations. I told that the meaning of "escape" sounds a bit romantic and escaping is not exactly the same as diving into the story as you related. I like the expression "reading to embrace" as you said.

Sunltcloud wrote:

marciliogq wrote:

Sunltcloud,

 

Reading to escape sound so romantic, and I say romantic from Romanticism. But in the sense you tell I think it's quite impossible (in my simple opinion!) reading without getting a profound diving into the atmosphere of the bookm without living the story, travelling with the characters. If these elements are not in my reading so it was no more than a mechanical reading. 


 

If I understand you correctly you are saying that not "reading to escape" would mean that reading is mechanical (and not romantic?). Maybe it's a matter of semantics, but I certainly don't mean to imply that I don't live the stories I read. I am only interpreting the term "reading to escape" differently, certainly not the experience of reading. If I could give it a name I would say that I am "reading to embrace."  

 

Wordsmith
marciliogq
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎02-22-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Tarri,
Obviously we have some favorite kinds of books but I also read all kinds of books since I was a child. It's interesting that my preferences changed as the time has gone by. At present I'm reading a lot of fantastic realism, mystery, horror and sci-fi (my next reading). I like introspective writings. Some readers have indicated me adventure and classic books. As a literature professor it's quite impossible for me not to compare authors and books, but I try not to do it. I always say each author has himself his own worth.
 

Tarri wrote:

I read because I love words. 

 

I read all genres and, in my entire life, I've only not finished one book.  I just love to read and I find something to like or think about in every book.  I don't read a book/author and compare it with another book/author, because, for me, all books are worth something all on their own.  


 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Happy Birthday!  :smileyhappy:


artist4nature wrote:

What a great birthday I had - a wonderful day at the beach, chowder and clam cakes for dinner and - a present on the step when I got home.  My copy of This Unbroken Sky. Can life get any better:smileywink:


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Wordsmith
marciliogq
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎02-22-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

A moment to celebrate with friends, books and a wonderful discussion. Have a happy birthday!!!!

artist4nature wrote:

What a great birthday I had - a wonderful day at the beach, chowder and clam cakes for dinner and - a present on the step when I got home.  My copy of This Unbroken Sky. Can life get any better:smileywink:


 

Distinguished Correspondent
Thayer
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room


dhaupt wrote:
I often read books to "escape", but not because I'm dissatisfied with my life or my job or my husband etc. but just because I want a mini vacation to the hills of Scotland with Outlander or the upper part of New York State to be with the Black Dagger Brotherhood or perhaps to another world and visit with the Tairen in the Fading Lands. And I can do this much better in a book than I can in a movie, because a movie tells me what to think and who to put in what role where as a character or place in a book is only how I tell it to be with the small direction of course of the author. My only problem is trying to choose whether I want to escape into fantasy or reality, paranormal or sci-fi, now that's a hard choice.

 

Debbie,

 

I adored the Outlander series...Diana Gabaldon is one of my favorite authors. And like this forum, I would have never discovered her without the recommendation of someone else (an associate at an out of town Barnes and Noble store, while on holiday). One of the myriad reasons that I love this club!!!:smileyvery-happy:

 

 

~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Zeal
Posts: 258
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

This is one of the most amazing, yet heartbreaking books that I have ever read.  I highly recommend it to anyone interested in other cultures and the power of the human spirit.  The author has decided to donate all of the proceeds of his U.S. sales to the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children...one more reason to purchase this book.  You will not forget this story.

 

The Blue Notebook by James A. Levine: Book Cover

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Blue-Notebook/James-A-Levine/e/9780385528719/?itm=1
"I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing, and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer."
Sharon Draper
Wordsmith
Anna_Louise
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎06-17-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Happy Birthday!

 

What a wonderful birthday present....to receive the book.  I received my book as well and can't wait to get started!  First, however, 7 chapters of Western Civilization before Monday's class.

 

 

Correspondent
retromom
Posts: 113
Registered: ‎02-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room


artist4nature wrote:

What a great birthday I had - a wonderful day at the beach, chowder and clam cakes for dinner and - a present on the step when I got home.  My copy of This Unbroken Sky. Can life get any better:smileywink:


 

That is a wonderful birthday gift! Happy Birthday!
Beth

http://bookaholicmom.blogspot.com/
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,829
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room


Thayer wrote:

dhaupt wrote:
I often read books to "escape", but not because I'm dissatisfied with my life or my job or my husband etc. but just because I want a mini vacation to the hills of Scotland with Outlander or the upper part of New York State to be with the Black Dagger Brotherhood or perhaps to another world and visit with the Tairen in the Fading Lands. And I can do this much better in a book than I can in a movie, because a movie tells me what to think and who to put in what role where as a character or place in a book is only how I tell it to be with the small direction of course of the author. My only problem is trying to choose whether I want to escape into fantasy or reality, paranormal or sci-fi, now that's a hard choice.

 

Debbie,

 

I adored the Outlander series...Diana Gabaldon is one of my favorite authors. And like this forum, I would have never discovered her without the recommendation of someone else (an associate at an out of town Barnes and Noble store, while on holiday). One of the myriad reasons that I love this club!!!:smileyvery-happy:

 

 


Me too, I found Diana on one of the other B&N clubs that I frequent. I just love B&N book clubs and have bugged every one I know to join in on the fun.
Good to talk to you and look forward to discussing this book with you and everyone. 

 

Wordsmith
maude40
Posts: 357
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I too loved the Outlander series. Her newest book in the series is due out in September.An Echo in the Bone  I've already preordered it. Yvonne 
Frequent Contributor
GadgetgirlKS
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎02-10-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I decided to take a sneak peek at the book last night and before I knew it I was 30 pages into it! I could have kept going, but I really want to read according to the schedule so that I can discuss the book online without the worry of writing a spoiler.

 

I am so anxious for the discussion to start. This is going to be a great book and discussion.

 

Emily