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Frequent Contributor
julyso
Posts: 67
Registered: ‎12-04-2007
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Re: Wish Lists

[ Edited ]
Thanks to all-now I have several books to add to my list! They all sound great:smileyhappy:
Message Edited by julyso on 07-14-2009 01:28 PM
Julie
Wordsmith
Anna_Louise
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎06-17-2009
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Re: Community Room

Does anyone know if we can add Under This Unbroken Sky to our library and mark reading now?   I tried to search and it doesn't come up.  Is this because it is not released yet?  Thanks.

 

Anna

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Community Room

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

Take the last book, "Of Bees and Mist." I never once wanted to escape into the book; the characters had more problems than I do. Yes, I did accept them into my life for a while. I discussed them on the board, thought about them, liked or disliked them, gave them a podium to make themselves heard. Even after I was finished with the book a few still come by to visit occasionally.

 

In preparation for the new book "Under This Unbroken Sky" I am reading a book by Alice Munro, a Canadian short story writer. Why? Not to escape, but to allow the "Canadian atmosphere" seep into me, to prime me for the adventure of an immigrant family who survives hardships. I'll probably read something about Stalin's purge before we begin our discussions. Again, not to escape, but to learn.

 

I read a lot of travel essays, travel guides, travel novels, and when I invite a foreign culture to keep me company I don't want to escape to foreign shores; I want to sit in the safety of my own vicinity and "taste" the offerings out there, before I get ready to actually travel.

 

As child I read stories that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon. I still think about them now, so many years later.

 

Books never take me away from my self completely, the way a film does. When I watch a movie there is no time to reflect, no room for sitting back and "looking in" on the characters' lives. Except when a scene drags out and I feel the urge to scream "cut." And because all my senses are so intensely involved, I am inclined to say that I "escape" into a movie. Even the darkness of the cinema contributes to that feeling. Yesterday I saw "Ice Age." Yes, I escaped the heat of the afternoon to be charmed by a sloth and my favorite wooly mamoth. 

 

Maybe the difference, for me at least, is the fact that a movie lays out all the details, without asking me to interact. A book gives me the pleasure of inventing my own images of scenery, characters, events. I am in charge of creative interpretation. I might even relive parts of a novel in my imagination because they touch me, but does that mean that I am escaping my own world or does it mean that I am giving my world a little extra  flair? I decide what to keep, what to toss, what to embellish. That's it, I think; I can't escape and be in charge at the same time.  

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
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Re: Community Room

Try using the isbn (below), Anna. That should work in search.

 

9780061774027

 


Anna_Louise wrote:

Does anyone know if we can add Under This Unbroken Sky to our library and mark reading now?   I tried to search and it doesn't come up.  Is this because it is not released yet?  Thanks.

 

Anna


 

Distinguished Correspondent
PiperMurphy
Posts: 174
Registered: ‎09-19-2008

Re: Community Room


Sunltcloud wrote:

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

Take the last book, "Of Bees and Mist." I never once wanted to escape into the book; the characters had more problems than I do. Yes, I did accept them into my life for a while. I discussed them on the board, thought about them, liked or disliked them, gave them a podium to make themselves heard. Even after I was finished with the book a few still come by to visit occasionally.

 

In preparation for the new book "Under This Unbroken Sky" I am reading a book by Alice Munro, a Canadian short story writer. Why? Not to escape, but to allow the "Canadian atmosphere" seep into me, to prime me for the adventure of an immigrant family who survives hardships. I'll probably read something about Stalin's purge before we begin our discussions. Again, not to escape, but to learn.

 

I read a lot of travel essays, travel guides, travel novels, and when I invite a foreign culture to keep me company I don't want to escape to foreign shores; I want to sit in the safety of my own vicinity and "taste" the offerings out there, before I get ready to actually travel.

 

As child I read stories that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon. I still think about them now, so many years later.

 

Books never take me away from my self completely, the way a film does. When I watch a movie there is no time to reflect, no room for sitting back and "looking in" on the characters' lives. Except when a scene drags out and I feel the urge to scream "cut." And because all my senses are so intensely involved, I am inclined to say that I "escape" into a movie. Even the darkness of the cinema contributes to that feeling. Yesterday I saw "Ice Age." Yes, I escaped the heat of the afternoon to be charmed by a sloth and my favorite wooly mamoth. 

 

Maybe the difference, for me at least, is the fact that a movie lays out all the details, without asking me to interact. A book gives me the pleasure of inventing my own images of scenery, characters, events. I am in charge of creative interpretation. I might even relive parts of a novel in my imagination because they touch me, but does that mean that I am escaping my own world or does it mean that I am giving my world a little extra  flair? I decide what to keep, what to toss, what to embellish. That's it, I think; I can't escape and be in charge at the same time.  

 


This is a really interesting question, and you make some valid points. I think to answer the question you have to consider what you are "escaping from" or "escaping to". I don't think that I "escape from" because whatever it is that I want to escape is still there no matter what. I can't avoid it. However, I can "escape to". I can become so consumed by a book that their world becomes mine, and when I'm finished I have to reconnect with my world. It's not something that I consciously plan to do and it doesn't happen with every book that I read. When it does happen, I know that I have read a really great book.

"When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes."
~Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus~
Correspondent
meme1
Posts: 106
Registered: ‎12-17-2007
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Re: Community Room

I truly agree with your analysis of "escape".   Often I read books by authors who are from an area with which I am familiar (WI, MN, ND) or an area in which I've traveled .  I like being familiar with the settings or the attitudes of the people who live in the area.  ~ I also concur on the childhood reading "that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon."  ~ Movies let me "just be".  Since I don't have to visualize what a character or scenery looks like, I can just sit back and "escape"!  ~ Thanks for formulating these thoughts. :smileywink:

Sunltcloud wrote:

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

Take the last book, "Of Bees and Mist." I never once wanted to escape into the book; the characters had more problems than I do. Yes, I did accept them into my life for a while. I discussed them on the board, thought about them, liked or disliked them, gave them a podium to make themselves heard. Even after I was finished with the book a few still come by to visit occasionally.

 

In preparation for the new book "Under This Unbroken Sky" I am reading a book by Alice Munro, a Canadian short story writer. Why? Not to escape, but to allow the "Canadian atmosphere" seep into me, to prime me for the adventure of an immigrant family who survives hardships. I'll probably read something about Stalin's purge before we begin our discussions. Again, not to escape, but to learn.

 

I read a lot of travel essays, travel guides, travel novels, and when I invite a foreign culture to keep me company I don't want to escape to foreign shores; I want to sit in the safety of my own vicinity and "taste" the offerings out there, before I get ready to actually travel.

 

As child I read stories that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon. I still think about them now, so many years later.

 

Books never take me away from my self completely, the way a film does. When I watch a movie there is no time to reflect, no room for sitting back and "looking in" on the characters' lives. Except when a scene drags out and I feel the urge to scream "cut." And because all my senses are so intensely involved, I am inclined to say that I "escape" into a movie. Even the darkness of the cinema contributes to that feeling. Yesterday I saw "Ice Age." Yes, I escaped the heat of the afternoon to be charmed by a sloth and my favorite wooly mamoth. 

 

Maybe the difference, for me at least, is the fact that a movie lays out all the details, without asking me to interact. A book gives me the pleasure of inventing my own images of scenery, characters, events. I am in charge of creative interpretation. I might even relive parts of a novel in my imagination because they touch me, but does that mean that I am escaping my own world or does it mean that I am giving my world a little extra  flair? I decide what to keep, what to toss, what to embellish. That's it, I think; I can't escape and be in charge at the same time.  

 


 

meme

~~ Just when the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly.

~~ Be careful reading health books. You may die of a misprint. Mark Twain
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,832
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Community Room

I often read books to "escape", but not because I'm dissatisfied with my life or my job or my husband etc. but just because I want a mini vacation to the hills of Scotland with Outlander or the upper part of New York State to be with the Black Dagger Brotherhood or perhaps to another world and visit with the Tairen in the Fading Lands. And I can do this much better in a book than I can in a movie, because a movie tells me what to think and who to put in what role where as a character or place in a book is only how I tell it to be with the small direction of course of the author. My only problem is trying to choose whether I want to escape into fantasy or reality, paranormal or sci-fi, now that's a hard choice.
Inspired Correspondent
Amanda-Louise
Posts: 156
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: reading with schedule?

Oh, I did read the thread, but I just didn't get to participate at the time Erick was there because I was reading with the schedule and really worried that I would read a spoiler which would have ruined the book (or any for that matter) for me.

 

I think this time I'm going to read with the schedule and participate in all threads and just keep my fingers crossed that I don't come across something I don't already know!  (I'm assuming Paul also thinks this book is well served by reading to the schedule?  Last time he emphasized that it was best to read that way, but he's been quiet on the subject this go.)

 

Cheers,

Amanda

 


pode wrote:

Oh my goodness!  I think you missed a lot not reading Erick's thread.  That was maybe my favorite part of that First Read selection.  I didn't feel like there were "spoilers" there.  Lots of insights to him and his book. I couldn't read everything because of time constraints but I thought folks were good at giving alerts for spoilers.

 

pode


 

 

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
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Re: reading with schedule?

Ultimately, I think people should read to the way/schedule that suits their taste. That being said, by sticking to the schedule those particular parts and chapters --that are being discussed -- are fresh for the talking. In my opinion that's the classic structure of a book club.

 


Amanda-Louise wrote:

Oh, I did read the thread, but I just didn't get to participate at the time Erick was there because I was reading with the schedule and really worried that I would read a spoiler which would have ruined the book (or any for that matter) for me.

 

I think this time I'm going to read with the schedule and participate in all threads and just keep my fingers crossed that I don't come across something I don't already know!  (I'm assuming Paul also thinks this book is well served by reading to the schedule?  Last time he emphasized that it was best to read that way, but he's been quiet on the subject this go.)

 

Cheers,

Amanda

 


Wordsmith
kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: Community Room


pen21 wrote:

I copied this from another thread that explained laurels

 

Laurels

 

Laurels – the new green buttons that you see on the right side of every message - are a way of showing your appreciation for a post that you’ve read here on the Book Clubs.   Did someone say something that you think is insightful, funny, or profound; something that made you look at a book in a new way, or helped you learn something?  Simply click on the green button to reward that post with laurels.  Getting laurels from other users – and giving them out yourself – contributes to your rank here at the Book Clubs and will eventually grant you the ability to give larger numbers of laurels – as well as access to special features.

 

Hope this helps you.

Pen21

 


kpatton wrote:

pen21 wrote:

Check out the link Paul sent, you can post comments and give laurels on this page to Katherine Howe. I am hoping she reads them. It was a great book.

 

Paul, thanks for posting this.


PaulH wrote:

Hi,

 

To everyone who read The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, Katherine has posted a note to you all in our Unabashedly Bookish Blog.

 

Paul


 

 

What is a laurel?

 

Kathy


 

 

 


Thank you so much for the information.  It was very helpful.  I may get all the ins and outs of this web discussion yet.

Kathy

Wordsmith
kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: Wish Lists


januttall wrote:

artist4nature wrote:

I have just finished a great non-fiction book that I would like to recommend:

 

A Pearl in the Storm

A Pearl in the Storm 

 by Tori Murden McClure "the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean.

 

Her story is unbelievable!  She lived through hurricaine Danielle in her 23 foot specially built rowing boat.  She is a woman who sees a challenge and grabs it with her whole being.  An incredible story about an amazing woman.

 

Has anyone else read it!  Let me know what you think.


This looks fantastic - thanks for the recommendation (I've added it to my wish list).

My sister just highly recommended another non-fiction selection to me.  Has anyone read

The Devil in the White City?

 

I read Devil in the White City several years ago and liked it very much.  A book I would definitely recommend.  Reads almost like fiction.  The story alternates between the building of the World's Fair buildings and a murder taking advantage of young women coming to Chicago looking for work.  

Kathy

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

You are welcome, meme1. And, by the way, I love your tag about the caterpillar becoming a butterfly. I think we all have had those moments.
meme1 wrote:
I truly agree with your analysis of "escape".   Often I read books by authors who are from an area with which I am familiar (WI, MN, ND) or an area in which I've traveled .  I like being familiar with the settings or the attitudes of the people who live in the area.  ~ I also concur on the childhood reading "that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon."  ~ Movies let me "just be".  Since I don't have to visualize what a character or scenery looks like, I can just sit back and "escape"!  ~ Thanks for formulating these thoughts. :smileywink:

Sunltcloud wrote:

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

Take the last book, "Of Bees and Mist." I never once wanted to escape into the book; the characters had more problems than I do. Yes, I did accept them into my life for a while. I discussed them on the board, thought about them, liked or disliked them, gave them a podium to make themselves heard. Even after I was finished with the book a few still come by to visit occasionally.

 

In preparation for the new book "Under This Unbroken Sky" I am reading a book by Alice Munro, a Canadian short story writer. Why? Not to escape, but to allow the "Canadian atmosphere" seep into me, to prime me for the adventure of an immigrant family who survives hardships. I'll probably read something about Stalin's purge before we begin our discussions. Again, not to escape, but to learn.

 

I read a lot of travel essays, travel guides, travel novels, and when I invite a foreign culture to keep me company I don't want to escape to foreign shores; I want to sit in the safety of my own vicinity and "taste" the offerings out there, before I get ready to actually travel.

 

As child I read stories that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon. I still think about them now, so many years later.

 

Books never take me away from my self completely, the way a film does. When I watch a movie there is no time to reflect, no room for sitting back and "looking in" on the characters' lives. Except when a scene drags out and I feel the urge to scream "cut." And because all my senses are so intensely involved, I am inclined to say that I "escape" into a movie. Even the darkness of the cinema contributes to that feeling. Yesterday I saw "Ice Age." Yes, I escaped the heat of the afternoon to be charmed by a sloth and my favorite wooly mamoth. 

 

Maybe the difference, for me at least, is the fact that a movie lays out all the details, without asking me to interact. A book gives me the pleasure of inventing my own images of scenery, characters, events. I am in charge of creative interpretation. I might even relive parts of a novel in my imagination because they touch me, but does that mean that I am escaping my own world or does it mean that I am giving my world a little extra  flair? I decide what to keep, what to toss, what to embellish. That's it, I think; I can't escape and be in charge at the same time.  

 


 


 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Debbie,

 

I am glad you escape without being dissatisfied with your life, and isn't it great that there are choices, such as sci-fi and fantasy? 


dhaupt wrote:
I often read books to "escape", but not because I'm dissatisfied with my life or my job or my husband etc. but just because I want a mini vacation to the hills of Scotland with Outlander or the upper part of New York State to be with the Black Dagger Brotherhood or perhaps to another world and visit with the Tairen in the Fading Lands. And I can do this much better in a book than I can in a movie, because a movie tells me what to think and who to put in what role where as a character or place in a book is only how I tell it to be with the small direction of course of the author. My only problem is trying to choose whether I want to escape into fantasy or reality, paranormal or sci-fi, now that's a hard choice.


 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I totally agree with you, Debbie. I love the mini-vacations that allow me to relax and visit another place and time I wouldn't be able to visit. When I use the word escape, it isn't to run away from my life (which is very good), but just to visit and imagine.  :smileyhappy:


dhaupt wrote:
I often read books to "escape", but not because I'm dissatisfied with my life or my job or my husband etc. but just because I want a mini vacation to the hills of Scotland with Outlander or the upper part of New York State to be with the Black Dagger Brotherhood or perhaps to another world and visit with the Tairen in the Fading Lands. And I can do this much better in a book than I can in a movie, because a movie tells me what to think and who to put in what role where as a character or place in a book is only how I tell it to be with the small direction of course of the author. My only problem is trying to choose whether I want to escape into fantasy or reality, paranormal or sci-fi, now that's a hard choice.

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I must agree with both of you..I have never escaped my life ,which I like very much,books have enhanced my life,from the first book I have read as a child(Probably Dick and Jane)to everything inbetween..Now ,today I am "Visiting" Sullivans Island" while reading RTSI,Ah Scotland is always a treat,I go there with Barbara Taylor Bradford,and anything WW2  I am there...We are so diverse here,thats the charm...V
Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Correspondent
retromom
Posts: 113
Registered: ‎02-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I too enjoy escaping or visiting another place and/or time. I too am visiting Sullivan's Island this week although I am reading the first book in anticipation of the arrival of RTSI. I really do go places in my imagination when I read a book. Maybe it's more of a break from everyday life. It's interesting to see how others feel about escaping in a book.

 

Beth

Beth

http://bookaholicmom.blogspot.com/
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Piper,

 

You make some very good points. My mother used to read with such concentration that sometimes she would forget the world around her. My little brother would say: "What are we having for dinner?" My mother would stare up at him from her book and say, "What?"


Sunltcloud wrote:

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

Take the last book, "Of Bees and Mist." I never once wanted to escape into the book; the characters had more problems than I do. Yes, I did accept them into my life for a while. I discussed them on the board, thought about them, liked or disliked them, gave them a podium to make themselves heard. Even after I was finished with the book a few still come by to visit occasionally.

 

In preparation for the new book "Under This Unbroken Sky" I am reading a book by Alice Munro, a Canadian short story writer. Why? Not to escape, but to allow the "Canadian atmosphere" seep into me, to prime me for the adventure of an immigrant family who survives hardships. I'll probably read something about Stalin's purge before we begin our discussions. Again, not to escape, but to learn.

 

I read a lot of travel essays, travel guides, travel novels, and when I invite a foreign culture to keep me company I don't want to escape to foreign shores; I want to sit in the safety of my own vicinity and "taste" the offerings out there, before I get ready to actually travel.

 

As child I read stories that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon. I still think about them now, so many years later.

 

Books never take me away from my self completely, the way a film does. When I watch a movie there is no time to reflect, no room for sitting back and "looking in" on the characters' lives. Except when a scene drags out and I feel the urge to scream "cut." And because all my senses are so intensely involved, I am inclined to say that I "escape" into a movie. Even the darkness of the cinema contributes to that feeling. Yesterday I saw "Ice Age." Yes, I escaped the heat of the afternoon to be charmed by a sloth and my favorite wooly mamoth. 

 

Maybe the difference, for me at least, is the fact that a movie lays out all the details, without asking me to interact. A book gives me the pleasure of inventing my own images of scenery, characters, events. I am in charge of creative interpretation. I might even relive parts of a novel in my imagination because they touch me, but does that mean that I am escaping my own world or does it mean that I am giving my world a little extra  flair? I decide what to keep, what to toss, what to embellish. That's it, I think; I can't escape and be in charge at the same time.  

 


PiperMurphy wrote:

This is a really interesting question, and you make some valid points. I think to answer the question you have to consider what you are "escaping from" or "escaping to". I don't think that I "escape from" because whatever it is that I want to escape is still there no matter what. I can't avoid it. However, I can "escape to". I can become so consumed by a book that their world becomes mine, and when I'm finished I have to reconnect with my world. It's not something that I consciously plan to do and it doesn't happen with every book that I read. When it does happen, I know that I have read a really great book.


 

Correspondent
bookowlie
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎04-15-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

That's why I sometimes prefer reading after the kids are asleep!

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Piper,

 

You make some very good points. My mother used to read with such concentration that sometimes she would forget the world around her. My little brother would say: "What are we having for dinner?" My mother would stare up at him from her book and say, "What?"


Sunltcloud wrote:

All across book groups I see and hear the phrase "I read to escape." This morning I took the phrase under my magnifying glass and wondered if it is heartfelt or if it has turned into a cliché. I often repeat phrases simply because they seem true or they have been drilled into me and they stuck. Do I really read to escape? The answer is NO.

 

Take the last book, "Of Bees and Mist." I never once wanted to escape into the book; the characters had more problems than I do. Yes, I did accept them into my life for a while. I discussed them on the board, thought about them, liked or disliked them, gave them a podium to make themselves heard. Even after I was finished with the book a few still come by to visit occasionally.

 

In preparation for the new book "Under This Unbroken Sky" I am reading a book by Alice Munro, a Canadian short story writer. Why? Not to escape, but to allow the "Canadian atmosphere" seep into me, to prime me for the adventure of an immigrant family who survives hardships. I'll probably read something about Stalin's purge before we begin our discussions. Again, not to escape, but to learn.

 

I read a lot of travel essays, travel guides, travel novels, and when I invite a foreign culture to keep me company I don't want to escape to foreign shores; I want to sit in the safety of my own vicinity and "taste" the offerings out there, before I get ready to actually travel.

 

As child I read stories that brought children with different backgrounds to my home, allowed me to fantasize about events I had never participated in. Their temporary friendship broadened my horizon. I still think about them now, so many years later.

 

Books never take me away from my self completely, the way a film does. When I watch a movie there is no time to reflect, no room for sitting back and "looking in" on the characters' lives. Except when a scene drags out and I feel the urge to scream "cut." And because all my senses are so intensely involved, I am inclined to say that I "escape" into a movie. Even the darkness of the cinema contributes to that feeling. Yesterday I saw "Ice Age." Yes, I escaped the heat of the afternoon to be charmed by a sloth and my favorite wooly mamoth. 

 

Maybe the difference, for me at least, is the fact that a movie lays out all the details, without asking me to interact. A book gives me the pleasure of inventing my own images of scenery, characters, events. I am in charge of creative interpretation. I might even relive parts of a novel in my imagination because they touch me, but does that mean that I am escaping my own world or does it mean that I am giving my world a little extra  flair? I decide what to keep, what to toss, what to embellish. That's it, I think; I can't escape and be in charge at the same time.  

 


PiperMurphy wrote:

This is a really interesting question, and you make some valid points. I think to answer the question you have to consider what you are "escaping from" or "escaping to". I don't think that I "escape from" because whatever it is that I want to escape is still there no matter what. I can't avoid it. However, I can "escape to". I can become so consumed by a book that their world becomes mine, and when I'm finished I have to reconnect with my world. It's not something that I consciously plan to do and it doesn't happen with every book that I read. When it does happen, I know that I have read a really great book.


 


 

Wordsmith
marciliogq
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎02-22-2008
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Read to escape

Sunltcloud,

 

Reading to escape sound so romantic, and I say romantic from Romanticism. But in the sense you tell I think it's quite impossible (in my simple opinion!) reading without getting a profound diving into the atmosphere of the bookm without living the story, travelling with the characters. If these elements are not in my reading so it was no more than a mechanical reading. 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Read to escape


marciliogq wrote:

Sunltcloud,

 

Reading to escape sound so romantic, and I say romantic from Romanticism. But in the sense you tell I think it's quite impossible (in my simple opinion!) reading without getting a profound diving into the atmosphere of the bookm without living the story, travelling with the characters. If these elements are not in my reading so it was no more than a mechanical reading. 


 

If I understand you correctly you are saying that not "reading to escape" would mean that reading is mechanical (and not romantic?). Maybe it's a matter of semantics, but I certainly don't mean to imply that I don't live the stories I read. I am only interpreting the term "reading to escape" differently, certainly not the experience of reading. If I could give it a name I would say that I am "reading to embrace."