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ladybug74
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I feel like I have too many replies, one after another, so I am going to quit for tonight after this post. I have been reading what everyone else had to say and I just had to reply to several things that I read.

 

After reading your comments, I don't have such a positive outlook for Petro in the future. I think that Lesya will be fine because she is a strong young lady, but Petro is already becoming too much like his father. I had not thought about them being left in the same town with Stefan until I read some of the other posts. I am sure he may try to claim his son in the future, or at least influence him. It would have been so much better if Maria had taken the children with her. 

 

I also wanted to comment that Theo did take the coward's way out by killing himself. I still think he acted in a moment of rage and would not have killed his sister if he had stopped to think things over first. If he was going to kill himself anyway, though, it would have been great if he would have killed Stefan first. 

 

I agree that Theo should not have risked being jailed again by having illegal alcohol in his home. All of the time that he spent in prison away from his family would have made him a changed man, though. I have seen so many people who drink as a means of self-medicating for depression. The social worker in me wants to think this could have been what happened to Theo.

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biljounc63
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I did not expect it to happen but I was hoping that Stefan's body would have been found somewhere out in the woods taken from the cold that night he left for the last time. I don't remember him being seen after that night. People like him are like ducks and enerything just rolls off thier backs.
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
~ Joseph Addison ~

"Reading lets you visit the world of another"
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emmagrace
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

[ Edited ]

Dstaff wrote:


But, suffocation doesn't explain the crying that Teodore heard. I don't have my book with me, but I thought it mentioned that he heard crying and thought a rabbit was in the second trap.


literature wrote:

SunItcloud wrote:

The way I understood it, she suffocated the baby first. I'm not sure I got it right, though.

 

Anna is crazed, sees a rabbit with a child's face. She nurses it, tells it that it isn't safe here, that it shouldn't have come. When she pulls the "fur skin" over the top of its head, I assume that it can no longer breathe.

 

I also wonder if there is a connection to Teodor's shedding of the "unfamiliar skin stinking of sweat and fear." (page 333) Does death bring all creatures to the same level? No longer separated by group, by skin, by fur, by clothing? Naked all! 

 

Page 299. Anna and the baby.

 

"How will you survive?" she asks the strange, magical creature. And she knows that something this beautiful cannot survive.

Its tiny fingers knead her breast. Anna pulls the fur skin over the top of its head. The baby squirms and mews.

"Shhh," Anna coos.
"I'll take you home."

___________________________________________________________________

 

I agree with you.  Anna did suffocate the baby.  She didn't believe she killed the baby because she believed the baby died the moment she conceived.  She is taking the baby home, back to her coyotes where she doesn't have to think who she is and what she has done.  She has always felt the coyotes were her friends and that was where she wanted to be.  At one point Anna was wondering how far back she would have to go to be reborn.


I also remember that Teodore went out to investigate because he and Maria heard a cry and thought it was a rabbit in their snare.

These are unedited copies and maybe in some copies the facts are different?

Message Edited by emmagrace on 08-22-2009 09:26 AM
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jbnie
Posts: 40
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I disagree with your comment about the implication that Theo wo be drinking to self medicate. I know that people drink for all reasons, joy, weddings, sadness, funerals or just to be social, wine at diner, few beers with friends. None of this is self medicating. Theo was relaxing in his own home and enjoying a drink. He should be able to do this


ladybug74 wrote:

I feel like I have too many replies, one after another, so I am going to quit for tonight after this post. I have been reading what everyone else had to say and I just had to reply to several things that I read.

 

After reading your comments, I don't have such a positive outlook for Petro in the future. I think that Lesya will be fine because she is a strong young lady, but Petro is already becoming too much like his father. I had not thought about them being left in the same town with Stefan until I read some of the other posts. I am sure he may try to claim his son in the future, or at least influence him. It would have been so much better if Maria had taken the children with her. 

 

I also wanted to comment that Theo did take the coward's way out by killing himself. I still think he acted in a moment of rage and would not have killed his sister if he had stopped to think things over first. If he was going to kill himself anyway, though, it would have been great if he would have killed Stefan first. 

 

I agree that Theo should not have risked being jailed again by having illegal alcohol in his home. All of the time that he spent in prison away from his family would have made him a changed man, though. I have seen so many people who drink as a means of self-medicating for depression. The social worker in me wants to think this could have been what happened to Theo.


 

in his own home, anyone should.

 

Whagt his tiome in prison probably taught him was how unfair and cruel both people and life can be.

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KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Saying Good-bye

[ Edited ]

As I went back through some of the ending pages of this book, rereading, and thinking about all that this story contained, I couldn't help but notice how Maria stands in the doorway "of the empty house"....what she thinks about...."the house would have stood a lifetime."  I felt as though she was looking at this house as she would have looked at Teodor...."how well-built the fame is, how strong the timbers .  ....."sees the clean, sharp lines etched by the hand planer, the sure, deep cuts of the saw and ax."

 

How many good-byes Maria had said, simply brought my throat tight, again, with tears ready to fall.  "She said a lifetime of good-byes."

 

"Maria props open the door with a large rock to let the souls wander in and out."  She says to this house, as if she's speaking to God...."I give it back."  As if she is giving this man she had married, back to God.  Her final good-bye to Teodor.

 

I also wondered about all of these little possessions they carried away with them, what each child carries, possessions containing practical uses, and heart-felt memories.  I wondered what we would carry away, if we were leaving so many memories behind.  What would be the important things to hold on to?

 

They have their stove, for warmth...their beds and blankets for sleeping; clothes, a table, chairs, benches for sitting and eating, or maybe even working on their school homework.  Pots and dishes, "and the last few jars of borschch and sauerkraut." Food.  Even the grain could be made into breads.

 

Tools and other assorted things to help them survive....the .22 is there.

 

Ivan's stash includes something from his father, the pocket knife, along with his odd assortment of things he collected in his sort life.  I'm sure most of these will give him memories of his best friend, Petro.

 

Katya's has more assorted memories, including her father's tobacco pouch, "which holds a partially smoked, hand-rolled cigarette and a burned wooden match.  These are her memories of her father.

 

Sofia's memories are more of the present...."two front-page newspaper clipping".  They describe what they are leaving, what most will try to forget....the two deaths that can't be denied, written down for all history.  I think Sofia may be the writer of this story.

 

Dania has captured her father in his own hand, the recipe for the Wheat Wine, which was the downfall for this family in this story.  She had earned money from working, and carries a pair of her father's socks...even though warn out.....a handkerchief, carrying "a small handful of rich black earth."  She see the future in these possessions.

 

Myron wears his father's legacy, I think proudly.  His father, who had neatly preserved them for his son....the jacket, and boots.  The tools, well cared for...and each one marked with his father's initials carved into the handle...T.M.  His father is close to him now.

 

Maria will carry the picture of the Blessed Virgin, showing her faith in the future...along with her packets of seeds....hers and Teodors wedding bands....a lock of his hair, the the cross that he carved for her.  Her mother's Bible...all containing the past, through the present, as they enter the future.

 

My question, again, what would you take away from your memories, into the future?

 

Kathy S.

 

 

Message Edited by KathyS on 08-22-2009 10:11 AM
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melisndav
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Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

What is your impression of the land offices and officers that write the letters discussing Theo and Anna's dispute? What is their interpretation of this story?

 

I enjoyed the letters that showed Theo's and Anna's dispute.  I found that they added an interesting layer to the story.  I believe the land officers understood that there was an agreement of sorts between the two famillies, even though Theo's daughter burned the proof of purchase.  If they did not believe there was some truth to the matter, the land officers would have appeared and made Theo's family leave the area for squatting on someone else's property.


In this heartbreaking chapter, we see, first Mysha, then Anna, then Theo break down and kill. Can you talk about what has driven each of them to do it? How is it possible that they are each capable of it? Are they each aware of what they are doing?

 

Lysha killed her chicken 'Happiness' as maybe as part of killing herself.  She believed herself to be a monster with her crippled foot and she saw Happiness the same way.  I believe that Anna' issues went back to when she first had Lysha.  The baby was not perfect and in that way was a reflection on her.  In turn, she did not love her children as much as she could have.  Theo finally snapped.  He could not face having to go to prison again.  Plus, he was angry over the baby that Anna had killed, this is where you could see that Theo was a family man.


Has your impression or judgment of Theo changed entirely?   A little bit.  I was disappointed that he went to those extremes when he realized what his sister's life had become, and in turn, it had affected his as well.  I would have liked to see a little bit more flashbacks regarding Theo's time in jail so we could see what he went through.

 

Do you feel you have any sense for the possible outcome of any of the surviving characters? Is there anyone you might make a prediction for?

 

We've talked quite a bit about animals--In what ways have the coyotes been characters in the novel?

 

The coyotes kept appearing in the storyline as I believe, as Anna's spirit.  She wanted to be free from her life, no husband, no children, and the coyotes could roam wherever they wanted with no responsiblities.

 

What is this new Spring like for Maria's family?  I believe the new spring is harder for Maria's family, what with the loss of Theo and Anna.  Both of Anna's children were part of Maria's family for so long, that they also lost the children (Lsyha and Petro) because they could not take care of them.

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

 Ladybug74 wrote:

 

After reading your comments, I don't have such a positive outlook for Petro in the future. I think that Lesya will be fine because she is a strong young lady, but Petro is already becoming too much like his father. I had not thought about them being left in the same town with Stefan until I read some of the other posts. I am sure he may try to claim his son in the future, or at least influence him. It would have been so much better if Maria had taken the children with her.

I agree that Theo should not have risked being jailed again by having illegal alcohol in his home. All of the time that he spent in prison away from his family would have made him a changed man, though. I have seen so many people who drink as a means of self-medicating for depression. The social worker in me wants to think this could have been what happened to Theo.
_______________________________________________________________

 

Hi Ladybug74,

 

I just wanted to comment on these two paragraphs.

 

I don't know why but it never entered my mind that Petro and Stephan would still be in the same town.  Hopefully Stephan left.  How does a 7 yr old digest all that has just happened to him?  His mother is dead,  a new sibling is dead, his uncle commits suicide, his aunt and his cousins leave town, he is now living with a neighbor while his own father lives in town?  That's hard to come to terms with at any age.

 

As far as Teodor being imprisoned for having alcohol in his home.  Wouldn't it have been poetic justice for Stephan to be imprisoned for drinking with him in his home and not turning him in?

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Zeal
Posts: 258
Registered: ‎03-18-2009

Re: Saying Good-bye

Kathy,

 

Wonderful ending thoughts for this novel and what a deep question that really made me think and examine my life of memories.  Two items that I would definitely take from my memories into the future would be:

 

     One--my grandmother's ring that she wore every day of her life.  When I was able to select something of hers to keep after she died this is what I chose.  The ring was caked with flour from the many baking sessions that she labored over...homemade noodles, cookies, etc.  I never forget to wear the ring, and I take great strength in just touching it during trying times.  It makes me feel as if my grandmother is with me...helping me through the difficult times and celebrating the happy times.  My daughter is named for my grandmother, and the ring will be past down to her.

 

     Two--a drum key (what a drummer uses to tighten his drums, cymbals, etc. upon setting up).  My husband and I grew up together, walking to kindergarten, etc., and we dated in high school.  We separated in college, but kept in touch.  He is a very talented musician and when he asked me to marry him, he was a very poor college student.  Instead of a ring, he asked me to accept his first drum key that virtually started his whole musical experience.  Needless to say, this meant so much more to me than any diamond.  I treasure it, and it will be passed down to my son. 

 

     I would probably also take each of my child's baby books where I have recorded all of their "firsts" with a picture or two.  My children mean the world to me, just as Maria's did to her.

 


KathyS wrote:

As I went back through some of the ending pages of this book, rereading, and thinking about all that this story contained, I couldn't help but notice how Maria stands in the doorway "of the empty house"....what she thinks about...."the house would have stood a lifetime."  I felt as though she was looking at this house as she would have looked at Teodor...."how well-built the fame is, how strong the timbers .  ....."sees the clean, sharp lines etched by the hand planer, the sure, deep cuts of the saw and ax."

 

How many good-byes Maria had said, simply brought my throat tight, again, with tears ready to fall.  "She said a lifetime of good-byes."

 

"Maria props open the door with a large rock to let the souls wander in and out."  She says to this house, as if she's speaking to God...."I give it back."  As if she is giving this man she had married, back to God.  Her final good-bye to Teodor.

 

I also wondered about all of these little possessions they carried away with them, what each child carries, possessions containing practical uses, and heart-felt memories.  I wondered what we would carry away, if we were leaving so many memories behind.  What would be the important things to hold on to?

 

They have their stove, for warmth...their beds and blankets for sleeping; clothes, a table, chairs, benches for sitting and eating, or maybe even working on their school homework.  Pots and dishes, "and the last few jars of borschch and sauerkraut." Food.  Even the grain could be made into breads.

 

Tools and other assorted things to help them survive....the .22 is there.

 

Ivan's stash includes something from his father, the pocket knife, along with his odd assortment of things he collected in his sort life.  I'm sure most of these will give him memories of his best friend, Petro.

 

Katya's has more assorted memories, including her father's tobacco pouch, "which holds a partially smoked, hand-rolled cigarette and a burned wooden match.  These are her memories of her father.

 

Sofia's memories are more of the present...."two front-page newspaper clipping".  They describe what they are leaving, what most will try to forget....the two deaths that can't be denied, written down for all history.  I think Sofia may be the writer of this story.

 

Dania has captured her father in his own hand, the recipe for the Wheat Wine, which was the downfall for this family in this story.  She had earned money from working, and carries a pair of her father's socks...even though warn out.....a handkerchief, carrying "a small handful of rich black earth."  She see the future in these possessions.

 

Myron wears his father's legacy, I think proudly.  His father, who had neatly preserved them for his son....the jacket, and boots.  The tools, well cared for...and each one marked with his father's initials carved into the handle...T.M.  His father is close to him now.

 

Maria will carry the picture of the Blessed Virgin, showing her faith in the future...along with her packets of seeds....hers and Teodors wedding bands....a lock of his hair, the the cross that he carved for her.  Her mother's Bible...all containing the past, through the present, as they enter the future.

 

My question, again, what would you take away from your memories, into the future?

 

Kathy S.

 

 

Message Edited by KathyS on 08-22-2009 10:11 AM

 

"I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing, and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer."
Sharon Draper
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KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Saying Good-bye


Zeal wrote:

Kathy,

 

Wonderful ending thoughts for this novel and what a deep question that really made me think and examine my life of memories.  Two items that I would definitely take from my memories into the future would be:

 

     One--my grandmother's ring that she wore every day of her life.  When I was able to select something of hers to keep after she died this is what I chose.  The ring was caked with flour from the many baking sessions that she labored over...homemade noodles, cookies, etc.  I never forget to wear the ring, and I take great strength in just touching it during trying times.  It makes me feel as if my grandmother is with me...helping me through the difficult times and celebrating the happy times.  My daughter is named for my grandmother, and the ring will be past down to her.

 

     Two--a drum key (what a drummer uses to tighten his drums, cymbals, etc. upon setting up).  My husband and I grew up together, walking to kindergarten, etc., and we dated in high school.  We separated in college, but kept in touch.  He is a very talented musician and when he asked me to marry him, he was a very poor college student.  Instead of a ring, he asked me to accept his first drum key that virtually started his whole musical experience.  Needless to say, this meant so much more to me than any diamond.  I treasure it, and it will be passed down to my son. 

 

     I would probably also take each of my child's baby books where I have recorded all of their "firsts" with a picture or two.  My children mean the world to me, just as Maria's did to her.

 


Thank you for your wonderful and thoughtful response.  These things hold precious memories, I can feel it in the words you speak.  If I were you, I'd make a copy of your post, and tuck it away somewhere for your family, or read it to them when you get a chance.  I know they would appreciate your thoughts; how much these things mean to you, which incorporates your love for your husband and children.

 

Be well, 

Kathy S.

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misslynn
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎07-18-2009
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

Unfortunately, I would have to agree with the land offices that the land belongs to Anna. Really, the agreement was between the two. There was a trust between them that sadly was broken. It would seem at the time, immigrant would just help each other other- especially more so since Theo and Anna were siblings. 

Anna's killing of her child was quite disturbing. But, it seemed that at the time she was totally out of her mind. She was having visions that her child was a rabbit. She didn't view her child as an actual human being.her daughter killed the chick that was her sidekick. But, she took out her frustration on "happiness" because she was doing what she was supposed to do-lay eggs and even broke the eggs that belonged to the other chicks. I think that reminded her of herself. She was doing her best, but her handicap and her status as a child made her helpless. Finally.Theo kills his sister. He wrongly assumes that Anna has turned him in and he knows that he will be sent to prison. After all the trouble with Anna and Stefan, this was just the last straw.

I didn't think Theo was capable of suicide. He was a hardworking and devoted family man. I guess it goes to show that in certain circumstances anyone can break.

I think that Theos family will be fine. Myron has already learned to be a man and he will take care of his family. Some of the girls will marry soon. Anna's kids will stuck stuck in a cycle of abuse.

 

 

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Ronrose
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I took a break from reading the posts so I could finish the novel and not spoil the ending. Well, wow! That was some ending. I had to go back to the opening scene of the description of the photograph. I had forgotten that it told of the deaths of three  family members, two of whom would be murdered.

  I think Theodor was a man caught in the grip of fate, which relentlessly squeezed him like a vise, turn by turn.  A man of the soil, such as  Theo, learns to accept the good and the bad that life brings, it is ironic and sad that he is being sent back to jail for having the whiskey, literally the fruits of his labor, rather than for murdering his sister, Anna.  Does he kill himself merely because he is being arrested or is it that he can not face being alone in his cell with the guilty memories of what he and Anna have done?

  I like the fact that each of Theodor's children carry away with them, something of their father's as they leave to go in search of a new life. Through these possessions they hold on to the love they shared, not wanting to bury the past, but to remember the love and the feelings they had as a family. 

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Readingrat
Posts: 72
Registered: ‎09-26-2007

Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I found this book thoroughly compelling from start to finish.  I felt the characters were so expertly crafted that they could have been culled from real people.  As a matter of fact, it wasn't until I read the author's acknowledgements at the back of the book that I knew for certain whether these characters actually lived or not.  In the last discussion section I stated that I had a feeling that Stefan was going to be the downfall of his family.  I was so happy when he left.  However even afer he was gone, the events he set in motion when he was around appear to have been enough to still drive both families under, even after he is gone.  The ending was sad and disturbing, but I felt it fit the story just perfectly.  Of course I did find myself wanting to know what ultimately happened to Maria and all of the children.
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ladybug74
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Registered: ‎03-18-2009
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring


jbnie wrote:

I disagree with your comment about the implication that Theo wo be drinking to self medicate. I know that people drink for all reasons, joy, weddings, sadness, funerals or just to be social, wine at diner, few beers with friends. None of this is self medicating. Theo was relaxing in his own home and enjoying a drink. He should be able to do this

 

in his own home, anyone should.

 

Whagt his tiome in prison probably taught him was how unfair and cruel both people and life can be.


If this is the case, then he was very selfish to risk going back to prison just to have a drink. If he was drinking to ease his depression, then it would be  more understandable at least. If he is willing to risk his family losing him again just to "relax in his home," he is a very selfish man. I would like to think it would be the other way around.

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ladybug74
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring


literature wrote:

 Ladybug74 wrote:

 

After reading your comments, I don't have such a positive outlook for Petro in the future. I think that Lesya will be fine because she is a strong young lady, but Petro is already becoming too much like his father. I had not thought about them being left in the same town with Stefan until I read some of the other posts. I am sure he may try to claim his son in the future, or at least influence him. It would have been so much better if Maria had taken the children with her.

I agree that Theo should not have risked being jailed again by having illegal alcohol in his home. All of the time that he spent in prison away from his family would have made him a changed man, though. I have seen so many people who drink as a means of self-medicating for depression. The social worker in me wants to think this could have been what happened to Theo.
_______________________________________________________________

 

Hi Ladybug74,

 

I just wanted to comment on these two paragraphs.

 

I don't know why but it never entered my mind that Petro and Stephan would still be in the same town.  Hopefully Stephan left.  How does a 7 yr old digest all that has just happened to him?  His mother is dead,  a new sibling is dead, his uncle commits suicide, his aunt and his cousins leave town, he is now living with a neighbor while his own father lives in town?  That's hard to come to terms with at any age.

 

As far as Teodor being imprisoned for having alcohol in his home.  Wouldn't it have been poetic justice for Stephan to be imprisoned for drinking with him in his home and not turning him in?


Yes, I would have thought Stephan was getting what he deserved if this would have happened. It would have also taught his son a hard lesson about being a "snitch."

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Read-n-Rider
Posts: 157
Registered: ‎01-29-2007
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring


kpatton wrote:

Require wrote:

 

We've talked quite a bit about animals-In what ways have the coyotes been characters in the novel?

 


 

The female coyote seemed to be a survivor just like Maria was going to be a survivor.  The coyote was missing one leg and Maria was missing her husband, but both continued on.

 

Kathy


Good point, Kathy; interesting comparison.

 

Joan

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pjpick
Posts: 1,042
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I'm embarrassed to admit I forgot to participate in the discussion. I started to read the book the day I got it and couldn't put it down (which bodes well for the author). Nevertheless, by the time the discussion rolled around I forgot to participate. So...here's my brief response.

 

Shandi, thank you. This is the first First Look book I've actually enjoyed (I've read 5). I was beginning to get a little bit discouraged with the book choices. The odd thing is, this is not a type of book I would normally like. I give you credit for hooking me in. Your story telling is superb. Though reading this story in the summer, I had to put my socks on because I just felt chilly by the frigid atmosphere you painted. My stomach often grumbled with hunger, and I wanted to jump right into the pages and shake Anna with frustration.

 

Kudos, Shandi for a great story.

 

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cocospals
Posts: 115
Registered: ‎12-25-2007

Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

Lyesa killing happiness was a reaction to her own handicap. Although she initially bonded with the chick, seeing the chick struggle everyday was a constant reminder to her of her own handicap.

 

Anna was one sick lady. She obviously was mentally ill and back in those days there was not the help that there is now. Murdering her own child is a clear indication of mental illness and it still exists in today's society.

 

Theodor just snapped. He was pushed to that point where his world was tumbling out of control and he lashed out. Still happening in today's society. The question that crossed my mind during the shooting scene was was he killing Anna out of anger or out of pity.  Was he really so concerned about his sisters mental illness that it was a mercy killing? Or was he so angry at what she did with the land people that he could not get past it?

 

I think the coyotes were a symbol for Anna's delusional behavior. You have heard on the news about people killing someone and they claim to have heard voices telling them to do it. The coyotes were those voices that Anna heard. Remember, they were out in the middle of nowhere and the coyotes cry and the wind were the only sounds to be heard.

 

The ending was dramatic (I could almost hear an orchestra's crescendo) and so, so sad. I don't know if the middle of the book would play well as a movie but the beginning and end would.  Would make an awesome mini-series.

 

 

Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there - John Wooden
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cocospals
Posts: 115
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring


pjpick wrote:

I'm embarrassed to admit I forgot to participate in the discussion. I started to read the book the day I got it and couldn't put it down (which bodes well for the author). Nevertheless, by the time the discussion rolled around I forgot to participate. So...here's my brief response.

 

Shandi, thank you. This is the first First Look book I've actually enjoyed (I've read 5). I was beginning to get a little bit discouraged with the book choices. The odd thing is, this is not a type of book I would normally like. I give you credit for hooking me in. Your story telling is superb. Though reading this story in the summer, I had to put my socks on because I just felt chilly by the frigid atmosphere you painted. My stomach often grumbled with hunger, and I wanted to jump right into the pages and shake Anna with frustration.

 

Kudos, Shandi for a great story.

 


 

Same thing happened to me. I was so engrossed in the book that the discussions just passed me by. I have also participated in quite a few FLBC and this is the first time I have let the discussions slip right past me.  Excellent, excellent book!!!  And for me too, this is not the type of book I would pick up at the book store and purchase.
Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there - John Wooden
Inspired Contributor
dclement04
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎09-30-2008
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Re: Later Chapters and Whole Novel: Winter and Spring

I LOVED this book.....everything was fantastic....I loved the last chapters and the ending.....it was very well written and I think was well deserved....although i would never do something like that but i think for Teo he just couldnt take it anymore and Anna just really need to be put out of her misery....she wasnt her herself...i dont ever think she was herself in this story since Stefan returned....she just went mad and didnt think logically.

 

to me the book was engaging, detailed...it told a great story and it was just one of the best books i have read this  year! 

 

I am definately going to recommend this book to others. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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What made Teodor drink?


ladybug74 wrote:

jbnie wrote:

I disagree with your comment about the implication that Theo wo be drinking to self medicate. I know that people drink for all reasons, joy, weddings, sadness, funerals or just to be social, wine at diner, few beers with friends. None of this is self medicating. Theo was relaxing in his own home and enjoying a drink. He should be able to do this

 

in his own home, anyone should.

 

Whagt his tiome in prison probably taught him was how unfair and cruel both people and life can be.


If this is the case, then he was very selfish to risk going back to prison just to have a drink. If he was drinking to ease his depression, then it would be  more understandable at least. If he is willing to risk his family losing him again just to "relax in his home," he is a very selfish man. I would like to think it would be the other way around.


 

Teodor was an extremely prideful man.  In this case, his pride would make him selfish.  He thought he should have at least one thing that would help him relax in his own home. 

 

He, of course, knew it was illegal, but he had no thought of being caught with this liquor.  It was his home, in the privacy of his own home...he felt safe in his home.  He never thought beyond that. 

 

When drinking, he was a different man.  A man who was able to break out of his shell.  Which was almost like his prison cell.  That's one of the reasons people drink.  Yes, the other is to try and mask pain.  He may have been trying to do both....When he drank, he felt at ease in a world he felt confined in.