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Anna_Louise
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎06-17-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

Do any of you have such token representations of your ancestors' lives?  No context. No story. Just an item? Do you ever conjure a story around that item?

 

I am the third generation from Polish-Ukraine immigrants in the early 1900s to the US.  We have a fur coat from my Polish great-great mother but don't know anything more about that.  We used to as children(as little as 3 for me and then no more; it dragged to the floor and I constantly had to hold it up! :smileyhappy: ) dress-up in that coat (when my mother and Babcia would allow us to) and pretend different things.  Sometimes we were from a wealthy family going to Mass or a special holiday, sometimes we were the same family but having sold everything for passage to the US, etc.  The coat unfortunately was ruined by moths one year and both my mother and Babcia had it made into teddy bears for us.  I still have that teddy bear even though I don't have that family anymore in my life. 

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Anna_Louise
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Registered: ‎06-17-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

Shandi:

 

Congrads!  You deserve it and what a truly wonderful work of art you created and shared with us all.  We are eternally grateful for your art as it will stay with us for years to come!

 

Anna

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Anna_Louise
Posts: 238
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

Shandi:

 

Are you planning a book tour for UTUS? 

 

Anna

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Bluemoon147
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎06-20-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

Hi Shandi,

 

Congratulations on a future best seller!!!

 

Was this book based on any personal experiences in your life or ones that were handed down or was research involved? 

I remember my grandfather telling stories about some of the same kind of situations in your book and it just brought back so many of those memories that I thought I had forgotten.   My grandfather's family came from Scotland but settled in Canada.  Though the characters were a little different, the story made me think a lot about his life back when he was young and about the stories he used to tell. 

 

Looking forward to finishing the book. 

Hope you have another book ready. 

I enjoy your style of writing and appreciate your characters.

 

Thank you

Bluemoon147 

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mnbc
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎01-26-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

Dear Shandi,

 

Thank you for the opprtunity of reading your great book. Your writing is amazing and I can't believe this is your first and am anxiuosly awaiting your next. The book was very well written and I love how you used colors in your descriptions of the sky and land. This book as someone noted reminds me of My Antonia. Again I very much enjoyed your book and it was hard to put down.

 

Good luck

Book Lover
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


Shandi-Mitchell wrote:

All I ever hoped was for readers to feel something. It's an unsettling story; you want to love, forgive, condemn and save and all you can do is witness. I'm pleased that the story seems to provoke the heart. 

 

There are a number of you on this thread that didn't ask a question but offered your congratulations. Thank you all for giving your time and entering this world; loving and hating the characters; and living their stories with them.  No matter what happens next or where the book travels, I will not forget this First Look group. You were the first to breathe life into my words. You gave me the greatest gift. 

 

I too am looking forward to the next book, too bad I have to write it first. 

 

sm 


Shandi,

 

For so many days, after I finished reading this story, I've wondered what I would take away from it, and what you've said, here and now, gave me the answer.  I think it is your story which breathe's life into us, not the other way around.  I think I've shed more tears, after I finished the story, than during.  Your words have become memories, like the ones you gave these characters, and those you have given back to us, now.  Every once in a while words stick in my head, until I can't get rid of them until I write them down.  It doesn't matter what I do during the day, they won't leave me, until I sit down and address them.  I did that, just now.  I don't know what they all mean, they're just words of emotions.  Black letters on a white page.  Whatever they are, I give them to you.

 

  

Just One More Day, Just One More Night

 

Just one more moment to hear the song

Just one more memory soft and long

 

The clouds will sing so near the sky

Night will mummer her soft goodbye

 

I hear these voices now floating near

They cry out loud with every tear

 

Through broken hearts, these souls will beat

Until I see soils trodden feet

 

Hard the times we see and know

Hands are warn from cold of snow

 

These hands are cracked from rock hard soil

The blisters bleed from long days toil

 

Again I hear these memories

Soft and long forever these

 

Into the sky the blackbirds swing

Down to the earth where children sing

 

Lifting hearts with careful ease

Carrying goodbyes across the seas

 

Until we meet, once again

Until we speak, as to a friend

 

Kathy S.

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

[ Edited ]

Anna_Louise wrote:

Do any of you have such token representations of your ancestors' lives?  No context. No story. Just an item? Do you ever conjure a story around that item?

 

I am the third generation from Polish-Ukraine immigrants in the early 1900s to the US.  We have a fur coat from my Polish great-great mother but don't know anything more about that.  We used to as children(as little as 3 for me and then no more; it dragged to the floor and I constantly had to hold it up! :smileyhappy: ) dress-up in that coat (when my mother and Babcia would allow us to) and pretend different things.  Sometimes we were from a wealthy family going to Mass or a special holiday, sometimes we were the same family but having sold everything for passage to the US, etc.  The coat unfortunately was ruined by moths one year and both my mother and Babcia had it made into teddy bears for us.  I still have that teddy bear even though I don't have that family anymore in my life. 


 

Interesting question.  I do have things that were family pieces...either jewelry, pictures, or crocheted, or knitted items.  But I've never particularly conjured up stories around them.  One piece I had (I gave it to my brother) was a carding wheel that belonged to my great-great grandmother.  It was given to me by an uncle.  Some one had painted it white.  At that time, I was refinishing a lot of different pieces of furniture, and I decided to strip this piece, and turn it back to it's natural wood finish.  (when my uncle saw it, he wanted it back...I said NO) I found the wheel had tiny copper nails holding it together, and underneath the bottom stand, were carved the initials of her name.  She was from Mass., and her last name was Holmes.  I was once told we were distant relatives of Oliver Wendell Holmes....so I suppose I conjured up some sort of romantic notion that I could write as well as he.  LOL

If you see me on the book shelves, I'll be Kathleen Holmes... Which will never happen....I hate the thought of being famous!  :smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by KathyS on 08-26-2009 01:57 PM
Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009

Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


Anna_Louise wrote:

Do any of you have such token representations of your ancestors' lives?  No context. No story. Just an item? Do you ever conjure a story around that item?

 

I am the third generation from Polish-Ukraine immigrants in the early 1900s to the US.  We have a fur coat from my Polish great-great mother but don't know anything more about that.  We used to as children(as little as 3 for me and then no more; it dragged to the floor and I constantly had to hold it up! :smileyhappy: ) dress-up in that coat (when my mother and Babcia would allow us to) and pretend different things.  Sometimes we were from a wealthy family going to Mass or a special holiday, sometimes we were the same family but having sold everything for passage to the US, etc.  The coat unfortunately was ruined by moths one year and both my mother and Babcia had it made into teddy bears for us.  I still have that teddy bear even though I don't have that family anymore in my life. 


Oh Anna Lousie
That is a wonderful story. To think your little bear was once an animal roaming the land a century ago and met a trapper or hunter; its hide traded, treated, and sewn by whom? into a coat; was it on display in a shop?; utilitarian and fashionable; so many hands must have strokend its fur; then bought; how long did it take to pay it off?; where was it worn?; passed through generations; taking the shapes of a great-great grandmother, great grandmother, grandmother, mother, and finally childrens' bodies; now a coat, now a blanket, now a cape;feasted on by moths; and then loving hands carefully saving the remains, reshaping them into your bears. Beautiful.
 
 

 

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Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


Anna_Louise wrote:

Shandi:

 

Are you planning a book tour for UTUS? 

 

Anna


There's one shaping up in Canada for October. I'll be going coast to coast. Halifax, Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and I hear there will be stops in between. I'm sure it will be exhausting, but exhilarating. Perhaps I should be worried, but I am blissfully naive. 
I don't know what will happen in the US, I hope I will have the chance to visit. I embarrassed to admit I haven't made it to many parts of your amazing country. Really just the two coasts. I've always wanted to see more. Perhaps I'll get my chance. Boston in September.
sm 

 

Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


Bluemoon147 wrote:

Hi Shandi,

 

Congratulations on a future best seller!!!

 

Was this book based on any personal experiences in your life or ones that were handed down or was research involved? 

I remember my grandfather telling stories about some of the same kind of situations in your book and it just brought back so many of those memories that I thought I had forgotten.   My grandfather's family came from Scotland but settled in Canada.  Though the characters were a little different, the story made me think a lot about his life back when he was young and about the stories he used to tell. 

 

Looking forward to finishing the book. 

Hope you have another book ready. 

I enjoy your style of writing and appreciate your characters.

 

Thank you

Bluemoon147 


Thanks Blue Moon,
I'd have to say the comes from  "personal experiences in my life and ones that were handed down and research" and most importantly what the characters dictated. I pulled from memories, archives, listening to elders, reading first person accounts of the time...I just tried to walk in their shoes.
I'm so happy that reading the book sparked memories of your own grandfather's stories. It is amazing what we have stored within us.  My husband is Scottish and also a fascinating history and culture. We always joke that he would have been in a castle and I would have been working the fields two hundred years ago. 
sm 

 

Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


mnbc wrote:

Dear Shandi,

 

Thank you for the opprtunity of reading your great book. Your writing is amazing and I can't believe this is your first and am anxiuosly awaiting your next. The book was very well written and I love how you used colors in your descriptions of the sky and land. This book as someone noted reminds me of My Antonia. Again I very much enjoyed your book and it was hard to put down.

 

Good luck


Thank you mnbc
I've seen some of the posts referencing great, great writers and I am truly honoured the book is evoking such associations.  But I must admit, I truly disassociate when I see such names mentioned near mine. I can't even place my book on my bookcase yet, because how can it possibly sit next to all those "real" authors. :smileyhappy:
Perhaps with time, I will be able to just say--thank you. 

 

Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


KathyS wrote:


Shandi,

 

...  Black letters on a white page.  Whatever they are, I give them to you.

 

  

Just One More Day, Just One More Night

 

Just one more moment to hear the song

Just one more memory soft and long

 

The clouds will sing so near the sky

Night will mummer her soft goodbye

 

I hear these voices now floating near

They cry out loud with every tear

 

Through broken hearts, these souls will beat

Until I see soils trodden feet

 

Hard the times we see and know

Hands are warn from cold of snow

 

These hands are cracked from rock hard soil

The blisters bleed from long days toil

 

Again I hear these memories

Soft and long forever these

 

Into the sky the blackbirds swing

Down to the earth where children sing

 

Lifting hearts with careful ease

Carrying goodbyes across the seas

 

Until we meet, once again

Until we speak, as to a friend

 

Kathy S.


Holy moly Kathy S.
You have given me the Sky.

 

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

Shandi wrote:

I don't know what will happen in the US, I hope I will have the chance to visit. I embarrassed to admit I haven't made it to many parts of your amazing country. Really just the two coasts. I've always wanted to see more. Perhaps I'll get my chance. Boston in September.

_____________________________________________________________________

 

I'm only a 5 hour drive to Boston and I was trying to think how I could work this out until I checked my calendar and realized it was a Wednesday.  I just figured it would be a Saturday.  Midtown Manhattan (NYC) has a hugh Barnes & Nobles and that I could easily do.  I'll track your touring  and hopefully I can meet you some day.  Enjoy every minute of your glory.  You deserve it.

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

 

Kathy, resident poet, I salute you. Your spontaneous impressions always fascinate me. And I am amazed how this book group stimulates us individually to explore our thoughts, follow our dreams. Before I began reading "Under This Unbroken Sky"I read historic accounts of the Ukraine, of Stalin, of the Prairies etc for two weeks. Then the book made all of the warmup exercises disappear. This was the real thing. Ms. Mitchell made sure of it. The Unbroken Sky absorbed every question I had; it pulled me out of my present home and sat me down among the homesteaders; I was one of them.

 

After the wind breezed me back to my own universe I was lost for a while, but then my creative self began to stirr and when I read your poem my curiosity drove me back to Germany to take another look at my own heritage.

 

"Again I hear these memories

Soft and long forever these"

 

The second house I lived in (the first one was in the Black Forest) was built in 1588 by the Huguenots in Schoenau bei Heidelberg. They used the foundation of a building dating back to the Zisterzienser monks in the 12th century. My great-grandfather was the last nailsmith in Baden Wuerttemberg. I just brought out the only artifact I have that relates to him - a nail he made. It is a square nail, almost three inches long. I remember as child looking through the window of his workshop; I think it was classified as historical monument and we were not allowed to go inside. We were also not allowed to make changes to the house, but when I visited a few years back (showing my granddaughter where I grew up) I saw that restrictions must have been partially lifted. There was a dormer window in the attic where I used to have my tiny room. 

I can see my great-grandfather sitting on the porch staring into the sky. He was in his late 80s when my mother and I moved in with him.

 

"These hands are cracked from rock hard soil

the blisters bleed from long days toil."

 

Thank you, Kathy, for the inspiration you gave me with your poem. I go back in increments; always aware of the "traps" that come with remembering details. I keep away from the "negatives" of my childhood. Pun intended - my step-father was a photographer - and of the thousands and thousands of photographs he took I own very few; a lot of the negatives are boxed up in the basement of the town's city hall; during my visit one of the council members asked if I wanted to sort through them; I said no. Too many negative memories.

 

But I love to remember houses, meadows, forests, stone walls, wooden fences, geraniums in planter boxes, the hop-scotch design on the cobblestoned street. The smell of lilac, the taste of a gooseberry or wild blueberry, the song of a lark, a cool gulp of buttermilk, a bacon grease sandwich.

 

And thank you, Ms. Mitchell, again, for the Sky's morning sun in the children's faces. Thank you for the "graying house and the prairies unfolding."


KathyS wrote:


Shandi-Mitchell wrote:

All I ever hoped was for readers to feel something. It's an unsettling story; you want to love, forgive, condemn and save and all you can do is witness. I'm pleased that the story seems to provoke the heart. 

 

There are a number of you on this thread that didn't ask a question but offered your congratulations. Thank you all for giving your time and entering this world; loving and hating the characters; and living their stories with them.  No matter what happens next or where the book travels, I will not forget this First Look group. You were the first to breathe life into my words. You gave me the greatest gift. 

 

I too am looking forward to the next book, too bad I have to write it first. 

 

sm 


Shandi,

 

For so many days, after I finished reading this story, I've wondered what I would take away from it, and what you've said, here and now, gave me the answer.  I think it is your story which breathe's life into us, not the other way around.  I think I've shed more tears, after I finished the story, than during.  Your words have become memories, like the ones you gave these characters, and those you have given back to us, now.  Every once in a while words stick in my head, until I can't get rid of them until I write them down.  It doesn't matter what I do during the day, they won't leave me, until I sit down and address them.  I did that, just now.  I don't know what they all mean, they're just words of emotions.  Black letters on a white page.  Whatever they are, I give them to you.

 

  

Just One More Day, Just One More Night

 

Just one more moment to hear the song

Just one more memory soft and long

 

The clouds will sing so near the sky

Night will mummer her soft goodbye

 

I hear these voices now floating near

They cry out loud with every tear

 

Through broken hearts, these souls will beat

Until I see soils trodden feet

 

Hard the times we see and know

Hands are warn from cold of snow

 

These hands are cracked from rock hard soil

The blisters bleed from long days toil

 

Again I hear these memories

Soft and long forever these

 

Into the sky the blackbirds swing

Down to the earth where children sing

 

Lifting hearts with careful ease

Carrying goodbyes across the seas

 

Until we meet, once again

Until we speak, as to a friend

 

Kathy S.


 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

sm,

 

KathyS said it already, and I agree totally, with absolute certainty - your words breathed life into us. Big time.

 

By using present tense, changing point of view, vivid colors, exact numbers,  short sentences, you made me run alongside your story, afraid I might be left behind and miss something. I am still in awe over your style. Now that I have gained some distance from the book I feel as if I had listened to the chatter of family members the whole time I was reading, when, in reality, it is your sentence structure that implies dialogue.

 

At times I had to laugh; I come from a culture of half page sentences. I love long sentences. Long philosophical sentences. One of my favorite books is "Death in Venice" by Thomas  Mann. I'll give you a sentence in English (though I like the original more):

 

"But the rain and oppressive air, the provincial, exclusively Austrian clientele at the hotel, and the lack of the peaceful, intimate relation with the sea that only a soft sandy beach can offer - these things irritated him, denied him a sense of having found the place he was lookig for; he was troubled by a pressure within him pushing in a direction he could not quite grasp; he studied ship schedules, he sought about for something; and suddenly the surprising but obvious destination came to him."

 

This is just an ordinary sentence and Mann's story is filled with many longer ones. But while I read "Under This Unbroken Sky" I was totally under the spell of the immediacy of your sentences.

 

"Anna swings her bloated belly off the bed and gingerly puts weight on her leg. It was her fault he threw the log. He didn't mean to hit her. He just wanted her to stop rattling the dishes so loudly. When he gets his headaches, he can't take the noise. She knows that. She knows the pounding in his head only goes away with a shot of whiskey. He felt terrible afterward. She calmed him with a warm towel on his forehead and promised to be quieter from now on. She pads across the icy floor in bare feet."

 

I lived with an alcoholic (toward the end of his life) and though I am not Anna, I breathe with her. I breathe her pain. I don't know what Stefan is drinking, but it must be similar to the "Winner's Cup" Vodka (what a name for such a destructive drink) that found its way into every aspect of my life.

 

See......... your words breathe. They leap like living organisms from the pages of your novel.

 

gf


Shandi-Mitchell wrote:

All I ever hoped was for readers to feel something. It's an unsettling story; you want to love, forgive, condemn and save and all you can do is witness. I'm pleased that the story seems to provoke the heart. 

 

There are a number of you on this thread that didn't ask a question but offered your congratulations. Thank you all for giving your time and entering this world; loving and hating the characters; and living their stories with them.  No matter what happens next or where the book travels, I will not forget this First Look group. You were the first to breathe life into my words. You gave me the greatest gift. 

 

I too am looking forward to the next book, too bad I have to write it first. 

 

sm 


KathyS wrote:

 

Shandi,

 

For so many days, after I finished reading this story, I've wondered what I would take away from it, and what you've said, here and now, gave me the answer.  I think it is your story which breathe's life into us, not the other way around.  I think I've shed more tears, after I finished the story, than during.  Your words have become memories, like the ones you gave these characters, and those you have given back to us, now.  Every once in a while words stick in my head, until I can't get rid of them until I write them down.  It doesn't matter what I do during the day, they won't leave me, until I sit down and address them.  I did that, just now.  I don't know what they all mean, they're just words of emotions.  Black letters on a white page.  Whatever they are, I give them to you.

 

  

Just One More Day, Just One More Night

 

Just one more moment to hear the song

Just one more memory soft and long

 

The clouds will sing so near the sky

Night will mummer her soft goodbye

 

I hear these voices now floating near

They cry out loud with every tear

 

Through broken hearts, these souls will beat

Until I see soils trodden feet

 

Hard the times we see and know

Hands are warn from cold of snow

 

These hands are cracked from rock hard soil

The blisters bleed from long days toil

 

Again I hear these memories

Soft and long forever these

 

Into the sky the blackbirds swing

Down to the earth where children sing

 

Lifting hearts with careful ease

Carrying goodbyes across the seas

 

Until we meet, once again

Until we speak, as to a friend

 

Kathy S.


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


Sunltcloud wrote:

 

Kathy, resident poet, I salute you. Your spontaneous impressions always fascinate me. And I am amazed how this book group stimulates us individually to explore our thoughts, follow our dreams. Before I began reading "Under This Unbroken Sky"I read historic accounts of the Ukraine, of Stalin, of the Prairies etc for two weeks. Then the book made all of the warmup exercises disappear. This was the real thing. Ms. Mitchell made sure of it. The Unbroken Sky absorbed every question I had; it pulled me out of my present home and sat me down among the homesteaders; I was one of them.

 

After the wind breezed me back to my own universe I was lost for a while, but then my creative self began to stirr and when I read your poem my curiosity drove me back to Germany to take another look at my own heritage.

 

"Again I hear these memories

Soft and long forever these"

 

The second house I lived in (the first one was in the Black Forest) was built in 1588 by the Huguenots in Schoenau bei Heidelberg. They used the foundation of a building dating back to the Zisterzienser monks in the 12th century. My great-grandfather was the last nailsmith in Baden Wuerttemberg. I just brought out the only artifact I have that relates to him - a nail he made. It is a square nail, almost three inches long. I remember as child looking through the window of his workshop; I think it was classified as historical monument and we were not allowed to go inside. We were also not allowed to make changes to the house, but when I visited a few years back (showing my granddaughter where I grew up) I saw that restrictions must have been partially lifted. There was a dormer window in the attic where I used to have my tiny room. 

I can see my great-grandfather sitting on the porch staring into the sky. He was in his late 80s when my mother and I moved in with him.

 

"These hands are cracked from rock hard soil

the blisters bleed from long days toil."

 

Thank you, Kathy, for the inspiration you gave me with your poem. I go back in increments; always aware of the "traps" that come with remembering details. I keep away from the "negatives" of my childhood. Pun intended - my step-father was a photographer - and of the thousands and thousands of photographs he took I own very few; a lot of the negatives are boxed up in the basement of the town's city hall; during my visit one of the council members asked if I wanted to sort through them; I said no. Too many negative memories.

 

But I love to remember houses, meadows, forests, stone walls, wooden fences, geraniums in planter boxes, the hop-scotch design on the cobblestoned street. The smell of lilac, the taste of a gooseberry or wild blueberry, the song of a lark, a cool gulp of buttermilk, a bacon grease sandwich.

 

And thank you, Ms. Mitchell, again, for the Sky's morning sun in the children's faces. Thank you for the "graying house and the prairies unfolding."


Gisela,

 

I'm glad you found your good memories to share, from my poem.  I always love to read/hear about your adventures.  They're so interesting, fun and positive....it makes me think of my own memories,at times, but I'm afraid they come to me as a crisp snap shot..some good, but always interspersed with the dark, and faded sepias. I can't rid my mind of those....but they are resolved, now...they can't haunt me anymore.

 

I wish I could say the same thing about this book...not haunting me, that is!  After I wrote and sent the poem into cyber space, I thought...WAIT!  It's not perfect!  It's not edited!  I stumbled over a couple of lines!.......but I left them, just as they came to me.  I don't know what possessed me to post it!  I've never given a poem to an author!  I tell you, Gisela, it's got to be this blasted book of hers!  :smileyhappy:

Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


KathyS wrote:
 One piece I had (I gave it to my brother) was a carding wheel that belonged to my great-great grandmother.  It was given to me by an uncle.  Some one had painted it white.  At that time, I was refinishing a lot of different pieces of furniture, and I decided to strip this piece, and turn it back to it's natural wood finish.  (when my uncle saw it, he wanted it back...I said NO) I found the wheel had tiny copper nails holding it together, and underneath the bottom stand, were carved the initials of her name.  She was from Mass., and her last name was Holmes.  I was once told we were distant relatives of Oliver Wendell Holmes....so I suppose I conjured up some sort of romantic notion that I could write as well as he.  LOL

If you see me on the book shelves, I'll be Kathleen Holmes... Which will never happen....I hate the thought of being famous!  :smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by KathyS on 08-26-2009 01:57 PM
 
Another great story. Amazing what treasures are hidden beneath. Love that you found her initials. I will look for that book Kathleen Holmes, one never knows what will happen.
My response to fame might be to become a cranky recluse. I have a writer friend, a wonderful poet, Sue Goyette (check out The True Name of Birds), we get together and chat during the many cycles of feast and famine, and dream one dream- to have just enough money to feel safe, so we can keep  writing. That's the wish. Fame, seems like an awfully frightening beast.
sm 

 

Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


literature wrote:

 Midtown Manhattan (NYC) has a hugh Barnes & Nobles and that I could easily do.  I'll track your touring  and hopefully I can meet you some day.  Enjoy every minute of your glory.  You deserve it.


I'm hopeful I will get to New York again soon. I will shout loudly if I am coming.
sm 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?

[ Edited ]

Shandi-Mitchell wrote:

KathyS wrote:
 One piece I had (I gave it to my brother) was a carding wheel that belonged to my great-great grandmother.  It was given to me by an uncle.  Some one had painted it white.  At that time, I was refinishing a lot of different pieces of furniture, and I decided to strip this piece, and turn it back to it's natural wood finish.  (when my uncle saw it, he wanted it back...I said NO) I found the wheel had tiny copper nails holding it together, and underneath the bottom stand, were carved the initials of her name.  She was from Mass., and her last name was Holmes.  I was once told we were distant relatives of Oliver Wendell Holmes....so I suppose I conjured up some sort of romantic notion that I could write as well as he.  LOL

If you see me on the book shelves, I'll be Kathleen Holmes... Which will never happen....I hate the thought of being famous!  :smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by KathyS on 08-26-2009 01:57 PM
Another great story. Amazing what treasures are hidden beneath. Love that you found her initials. I will look for that book Kathleen Holmes, one never knows what will happen.
My response to fame might be to become a cranky recluse. I have a writer friend, a wonderful poet, Sue Goyette (check out The True Name of Birds), we get together and chat during the many cycles of feast and famine, and dream one dream- to have just enough money to feel safe, so we can keep  writing. That's the wish. Fame, seems like an awfully frightening beast.
sm 

No, one never knows....but I think I do.....The fantasy of a pen name.  Does it keep you private?  Some think yes, some think no...I think, no matter what your name is, people are going to identify, and connect it to you, no matter where you are. 

 

I'll check out Sue Goyette's, The True Name of Birds. 

 

I think Virginia Woolf had similar thoughts as you (and I)...."enough money to feel safe, so we can keep writing."  Fame, for many artists is, as you say, "an awfully frightening beast."

 

I do dream of finishing my novel, or a book of poems (I certainly have enough to stuff into one!), but the novel I'm writing incorporates some of my poems....it's a gigantic mental project, all voices.  But, if it ever gets finished, I really doubt that I will have it published (for the public, anyway)....although I've been told to do so...it scares the living crap out of me...I'm too much of a private person....of course, you'd never know it by my actions on these boards.  

 

Writing brings out the extrovert in people, in their anonymity.  You're anonymous, for the most part...but to be published, it can end all of that.  I'm an introvert, I like my privacy, and that privacy affords me to be creative....my imagination has free reign, only then.  But I'm also a brain-stormer of ideas, I love the interaction between artist's minds.  I do try to hold it down to a dull roar on these boards....

 

I wish you nothing but the best with your publication of this novel....it will be a great success, I know it....just smile, nod your head, and say thank you, thank you, thank you....  I told a friend of mine, I picture you as another Harper Lee.  But let's hope you write just one more novel than she did!  :smileyhappy:

 

K. aka, whatever her last name is.....

Message Edited by KathyS on 08-27-2009 11:39 AM
Author
Shandi-Mitchell
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎07-08-2009
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Re: Questions for Shandi Mitchell?


Sunltcloud wrote: 

 

At times I had to laugh; I come from a culture of half page sentences. I love long sentences. Long philosophical sentences. One of my favorite books is "Death in Venice" by Thomas  Mann. 

 


 Hi gf

I haven't read the book. I only know the film, which I presume is a tonal representation. I must admit, I am still struggling through Proust's Remembrance of Things Past and I have had the book "borrowed' from my brother-in-law for three years...oh the shame. I'll put it back on my side table and then Death in Venice.