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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Unbroken Sky

 

This is a thread that may evolve as we progress through the novel, but can you talk about how the title "Under this Unbroken Sky" reflects the novel so far?

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,832
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Re: Unbroken Sky

Right now I take the title to mean that the expanse of land and unchartered wilderness still waiting to be settled is as big as "Under This Unbroken Sky".

My feelings may change as the novel continues. 

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booksJT
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎11-24-2008
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Re: Unbroken Sky

I think the title means that this land is still in its wilderness state. Once I read some more of the novel it might change.
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skiibunny1213
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎03-16-2009

Re: Unbroken Sky

I think the sky is the only thing that isn't broken in this novel. The land is broken when it is tilled and when the fire comes. Teodor has been broken by prison, and then again by his sister's betrayal. Anna was broken by her husband and her bad experiences during childbirth. Maria is broken by her lost connection with Teodor - she is lonely even when he returns because she knows he is not the same man she fell in love with long ago. Lesya's disability has not broken her, but the loveless family atmosphere that Stefan and Anna have created is slowly breaking both her and Petro. Teodor and Maria's children seem better adjusted than Lesya and Petro, but each in their own way are coping with the hardships of their lives and the loss of their childhood. Finally, both families are broken by the dispute between Stefan and Teodor and the events that come after. On page 303 Teodor looks up to see he is "under this unbroken sky" and realizes how broken their lives really are.
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nfam
Posts: 231
Registered: ‎01-08-2007

Re: Unbroken Sky

To me, the "unbroken sky" is a metaphor for the relationship between nature and man. The sky is always there, stretching out across the prairies during good time and bad. It's a constant. Under the sky, men and women struggle. Some are broken. All are changed by the struggle.
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kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky

For me (still reading Fall section, so only about half way through the book), this title makes me think of looking out across land that goes forever with little in the way to block your view.  Land and sky meet and reach out.  Being from S Dak. there are areas where this happens.  It can be beautiful and desolate at the same time.  I would think looking out at that vast expanse it could also look full of possibilities as well as looking untamable.

 

I love this title.

 

Kathy

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debbook
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Re: Unbroken Sky

I think it refers to the wildness of where they are living. Maria is frequently looking at the stars that seem to go on forever
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MsReaderCP
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎07-10-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

I keep looking for this to be spelled out in the book and I underline it and say "there it is!".  I agree with the majority so far that it the unbroken sky which goes on and on is like the land which is open and Teo can travel with his family from country to country as he has when he is a free man now.  However while he was in jail for a year it was five steps by five steps; he was confined with no sky.  And I am very worried with the way this section ended.  Why would he risk his family and put the moonshine back in the SAME hiding space?  I realize that he wants freedom under this sky but to me he seems to be saying that the moonshine is more important than his family.  Maria has even stated how important it is to her, "I won't wait for you." and after all he has put her through, he puts the moonshine back.  Was is something that was taken from him when he was imprisoned that he feels he deserves?????   
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Wisteria-L
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎07-06-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

The title has puzzled me from the beginning. I have asked Shandi to explain her thought on the title as well.

 

I believe it is a metaphor as well that the sky is vast and infinate. The earth is finite and has boundaries. The earth (including people) can be broken, their spirits broken, their lives broken, their will broken, their bodies broken, however Under This Unbroken Sky you can always see hope and freedom because it is infinate, they sky is unbreakable, therefore, you are given hope. You will survive, you will go one, you will heal under this unbroken sky their is hope for all.  It is something you can count on being their no matter what.

Wisteria,

"Few things leave a deeper mark on a reader than the first book that finds a way into his heart."

The Shadow of the Wind,
by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!

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valorietucker
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎02-03-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky


rkubie wrote:

 

This is a thread that may evolve as we progress through the novel, but can you talk about how the title "Under this Unbroken Sky" reflects the novel so far?


I think that it means that no matter what happens, the sky is a constant.  The earth changes, life changes, but the sky is always there up above.

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emmagrace
Posts: 162
Registered: ‎12-04-2008
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Re: Unbroken Sky

Under this unbroken sky can mean many things. As of right now, I think that it could mean that this family has been through so many terrible things and yet they are unbroken by those tragedies. They continue to love one another and work hard to survive and I have not seen them get all worked up over anything as of yet.
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pagese
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎05-01-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

I think the title refers both to the vast wilderness they live in and to their constant stuggle to survive in it.

 

 

Page

 

 

 

 

My Book Blog: www.pagese.wordpress.com

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CathyB
Posts: 271
Registered: ‎12-30-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky

I too think it is a metaphor - the unbroken spirit of a human being to survive against all odds - to love, laugh and live life to its fullest.
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Zeal
Posts: 258
Registered: ‎03-18-2009

Re: Unbroken Sky


rkubie wrote:

 

This is a thread that may evolve as we progress through the novel, but can you talk about how the title "Under this Unbroken Sky" reflects the novel so far?


 

The sky is a constantIt helps to deliver the weather and harsh conditions that may or may not "break" a person, animal, home, etcAnna's spirit is brokenTheodor's spirit is also broken in prison (but he fights back).  Sophia's dreams are brokenMyron's taste for hunting is broken when he discovers how much the rabbits sufferIvan's heart is broken time and time again by his father's failure to love himThe weather destroys crops, and fire breaks apart family homes and landThe sky is one thing that is always there...dependableIt may offer harshness or kindness, but there is no question that it will be there with each new dayEveryone and everything lives under this skyIt is forever "unbroken."
"I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing, and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer."
Sharon Draper
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!


 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

Kathy,

 

I am always awed by the way your heart (your mind? your body? your what?) translates the world of everyday events into music. Even though you are an artist who works with her hands (feels the world), when the insights appear they seem to morph into melody. And lyrics. I love it.

 

I think for me reality is stripped down to patterns. Light and shadow. Color hues. As I was sorting out the meaning of Unbroken Sky, though I was using words to get to the result, I saw myself flying above the clouds, in the blue endless sky. Free from patterns. Below me were the changing patterns of the seasons that project themselves onto the earth. Light and shadow. Life and death.

 

BTW, for the longest time I chased "silver linings." That was during my cloud picture days. Hence sunltcloud. Then I became a tree person. I have a journal filled with photographs of tree bark. Tree roots. Leaves. Right now I am in the middle of a vegetable period; I play with my food.

 

And when I am done with this post I have to find Morning has Broken. The melody comes but I can't quite put together the lyrics.

G.


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!


 


 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert! Yes, the Spoiler Alert is still in effect for this message!

Well, Kathy, you made me cry. I just listend to Cat Stevens and "Morning has Broken" on YouTube, then I reread the last couple of pages of "Under this Unbroken Sky."

 

I think it would make fabulous background music for the last scene. I would copy the lyrics here but don't know if that is allowed. Don't know much about copyright laws when it comes to these boards.

 

Anyway, I sat at my computer, envisioning the "exodus." Saw it with my very own eyes! Nature reclaiming the wounded land with a carpet of new growth. Wildflowers. A rock wall that will soon crumble. A shack with its door propped open.  A horse and cart. A woman walking behind the cart. Children in the cart. Cat Stevens singing. Clear. Crisp. Full of Hope. The horse shakes his mane and picks up speed. They are going east toward the morning sun. The end!

 


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!


 


 

 
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

G - You're sweet!  Thank you.

Your perspective is wonderful!  I can picture you flying!  Looking down above the clouds.  Night and day, life and death....shades of light and shadows....it does say it, doesn't it?

 

I just found the song, Morning Has Broken:  It's sung with lovely pictures.

 

Let's dedicated it to Maria and her children. :smileyhappy:

 

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Kathy,

 

I am always awed by the way your heart (your mind? your body? your what?) translates the world of everyday events into music. Even though you are an artist who works with her hands (feels the world), when the insights appear they seem to morph into melody. And lyrics. I love it.

 

I think for me reality is stripped down to patterns. Light and shadow. Color hues. As I was sorting out the meaning of Unbroken Sky, though I was using words to get to the result, I saw myself flying above the clouds, in the blue endless sky. Free from patterns. Below me were the changing patterns of the seasons that project themselves onto the earth. Light and shadow. Life and death.

 

BTW, for the longest time I chased "silver linings." That was during my cloud picture days. Hence sunltcloud. Then I became a tree person. I have a journal filled with photographs of tree bark. Tree roots. Leaves. Right now I am in the middle of a vegetable period; I play with my food.

 

And when I am done with this post I have to find Morning has Broken. The melody comes but I can't quite put together the lyrics.

G.


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!


 


 


 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Re Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

It is done. "Morning has Broken" dedicated to Maria and her children. We also have to give her a going away present. I will embroider a white tablecloth with wildflowers. You might want to design a jar for the wheat kernels?
KathyS wrote:

G - You're sweet!  Thank you.

Your perspective is wonderful!  I can picture you flying!  Looking down above the clouds.  Night and day, life and death....shades of light and shadows....it does say it, doesn't it?

 

I just found the song, Morning Has Broken:  It's sung with lovely pictures.

 

Let's dedicated it to Maria and her children. :smileyhappy:

 

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Kathy,

 

I am always awed by the way your heart (your mind? your body? your what?) translates the world of everyday events into music. Even though you are an artist who works with her hands (feels the world), when the insights appear they seem to morph into melody. And lyrics. I love it.

 

I think for me reality is stripped down to patterns. Light and shadow. Color hues. As I was sorting out the meaning of Unbroken Sky, though I was using words to get to the result, I saw myself flying above the clouds, in the blue endless sky. Free from patterns. Below me were the changing patterns of the seasons that project themselves onto the earth. Light and shadow. Life and death.

 

BTW, for the longest time I chased "silver linings." That was during my cloud picture days. Hence sunltcloud. Then I became a tree person. I have a journal filled with photographs of tree bark. Tree roots. Leaves. Right now I am in the middle of a vegetable period; I play with my food.

 

And when I am done with this post I have to find Morning has Broken. The melody comes but I can't quite put together the lyrics.

G.


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!