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Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert! Yes, the Spoiler Alert is still in effect for this message!

I'm sorry I made you cry.  I had also reread that last scene....it touched me, as well.  You put it all together, perfectly.  The morning sun was what I saw, but I had them heading West...with the warmth on their backs.....in Southern California! There is nothing like a California sunset....The End.  :smileyhappy:

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Well, Kathy, you made me cry. I just listend to Cat Stevens and "Morning has Broken" on YouTube, then I reread the last couple of pages of "Under this Unbroken Sky."

 

I think it would make fabulous background music for the last scene. I would copy the lyrics here but don't know if that is allowed. Don't know much about copyright laws when it comes to these boards.

 

Anyway, I sat at my computer, envisioning the "exodus." Saw it with my very own eyes! Nature reclaiming the wounded land with a carpet of new growth. Wildflowers. A rock wall that will soon crumble. A shack with its door propped open.  A horse and cart. A woman walking behind the cart. Children in the cart. Cat Stevens singing. Clear. Crisp. Full of Hope. The horse shakes his mane and picks up speed. They are going east toward the morning sun. The end!

 


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Re Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

I'll make Maria and the kids lots of jars and crocks, and a set of dishes,  all with a cobalt blue banding, and a yellow ochre wheat design on them!  House warming!

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

It is done. "Morning has Broken" dedicated to Maria and her children. We also have to give her a going away present. I will embroider a white tablecloth with wildflowers. You might want to design a jar for the wheat kernels?
KathyS wrote:

G - You're sweet!  Thank you.

Your perspective is wonderful!  I can picture you flying!  Looking down above the clouds.  Night and day, life and death....shades of light and shadows....it does say it, doesn't it?

 

I just found the song, Morning Has Broken:  It's sung with lovely pictures.

 

Let's dedicated it to Maria and her children. :smileyhappy:

 

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Kathy,

 

I am always awed by the way your heart (your mind? your body? your what?) translates the world of everyday events into music. Even though you are an artist who works with her hands (feels the world), when the insights appear they seem to morph into melody. And lyrics. I love it.

 

I think for me reality is stripped down to patterns. Light and shadow. Color hues. As I was sorting out the meaning of Unbroken Sky, though I was using words to get to the result, I saw myself flying above the clouds, in the blue endless sky. Free from patterns. Below me were the changing patterns of the seasons that project themselves onto the earth. Light and shadow. Life and death.

 

BTW, for the longest time I chased "silver linings." That was during my cloud picture days. Hence sunltcloud. Then I became a tree person. I have a journal filled with photographs of tree bark. Tree roots. Leaves. Right now I am in the middle of a vegetable period; I play with my food.

 

And when I am done with this post I have to find Morning has Broken. The melody comes but I can't quite put together the lyrics.

G.


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!


 

 


 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Re Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

Perfect! I love cobalt blue. Maybe we can get a few more posters to contribute to the house warming once they are finished with reading the novel.
KathyS wrote:

I'll make Maria and the kids lots of jars and crocks, and a set of dishes,  all with a cobalt blue banding, and a yellow ochre wheat design on them!  House warming!

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

It is done. "Morning has Broken" dedicated to Maria and her children. We also have to give her a going away present. I will embroider a white tablecloth with wildflowers. You might want to design a jar for the wheat kernels?
KathyS wrote:

G - You're sweet!  Thank you.

Your perspective is wonderful!  I can picture you flying!  Looking down above the clouds.  Night and day, life and death....shades of light and shadows....it does say it, doesn't it?

 

I just found the song, Morning Has Broken:  It's sung with lovely pictures.

 

Let's dedicated it to Maria and her children. :smileyhappy:

 

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Kathy,

 

I am always awed by the way your heart (your mind? your body? your what?) translates the world of everyday events into music. Even though you are an artist who works with her hands (feels the world), when the insights appear they seem to morph into melody. And lyrics. I love it.

 

I think for me reality is stripped down to patterns. Light and shadow. Color hues. As I was sorting out the meaning of Unbroken Sky, though I was using words to get to the result, I saw myself flying above the clouds, in the blue endless sky. Free from patterns. Below me were the changing patterns of the seasons that project themselves onto the earth. Light and shadow. Life and death.

 

BTW, for the longest time I chased "silver linings." That was during my cloud picture days. Hence sunltcloud. Then I became a tree person. I have a journal filled with photographs of tree bark. Tree roots. Leaves. Right now I am in the middle of a vegetable period; I play with my food.

 

And when I am done with this post I have to find Morning has Broken. The melody comes but I can't quite put together the lyrics.

G.


KathyS wrote:

G - Trying to figure out this title, felt like I couldn't see the trees for the forest!  And you hit the nail on the head.  Freedom.

 

All though this story, there were so many metaphorical sequences that overlapped, making it difficult for me to realize the meaning of this title.

 

Life and death = FREEDOM! The whole story takes turns giving us examples of both life, and death.  Even in death there was a freedom.  I won't go into the details at this point.

 

Just a minute ago a song poped into my head.  "Morning Has Broken".  I thought, why did this happen?  Usually songs don't come into my head unless there's a reason.  My head is full of music all the time, and all it takes is a word to set me off. :smileyhappy:

The only time the sky breaks is at dawn.  Not at night, not mid-day, and not in the evening.  Once the sun comes up, there is always blue sky someplace on earth.  Above the clouds, if it's raining or snowing....the sun is always shinning.  Even in the end, through heartbreak and sorrow, there was that small little piece of silver-lining called hope and freedom, in the form of a sack of grain.  For them it was their mustard seed.

 

K.S.


Sunltcloud wrote:

Spoiler Alert!

 

I think the question about the Unbroken Sky is asked a little early in the reading. I had to read almost to the end of the novel before I found definitive (to me at least) references to the Unbroken Sky. As has been mentioned above by skiibunny1213 the sky reveals its importance on page 303.

 

What shaped Teodor's future is laid out in front of us in one very short sentence when he recalls his prison sentence.

"They took away the sky." 

 

What gives him hope and energy follows in the passage after that. "He feels he can expand as far and wide as he can see."

 

The unbroken sky takes on different meanings for different observers. The literal is the expanse. the metaphorical is the wholeness. To Teodor the sky pulses freedom.

 "He exhales to the sky. Above him, northern lights flicker. Ivan says it's star people. Katya says it's God. Teodor doesn't know what it is. A reason to look up. He breathes in deep and the answer comes. It is freedom."

 

IT IS FREEDOM!


 

 

 

Inspired Contributor
skiibunny1213
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎03-16-2009

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

 

Sunltcloud I think you have it spot on. Freedom is exactly what they are all looking for. Anna is looking for freedom from pain, responsibility and her marriage. She wants to be free like the coyotes. Stefan wants to be free of the "lowliness" of his position in life as a farmer. Maria wants to be free of worrying about feeding her kids and the fear of losing her husband. Teodor wants to be free from prison, and then he wants the freedom to make a living of his own (the land dispute) and have some fun (the liquor). The same issues apply for the children as well. The problem is, after Teodor feels betrayed by his sister and believes he has no hope for ever owning his own land, and is then caught by the police and faces time in jail again, he realizes how broken his life is and he loses hope. The heaviness of all his burdens and his anger and frustration therefrom cause him to commit the unspeakable acts he does because he realizes that only in death can he truly be free.

 

On page 303 Mitchell writes:

 

"Free. Of everything they did to him [Teodor], it was the walls that nearly drove him mad.  Not being able to see the sky.  They tried to break him by breaking his body.  Animals can be broken that way... But some beaten animals become fiercer... They die before they submit.  But still, they die." 

 

I think it is here that Teodor accepts that he will die rather than go back to prison.  When he realizes this he is at peace with his decision.  Then he comes upon the wolves and while his decision remains the same, what he sees drives him to do one last thing before he dies.  In a way I think he set her free too.

Contributor
christinezeg
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎07-19-2009

Re: Unbroken Sky

 The sky is the only constant in this family's lives. Clouds may appear, storms may rage, heat may burn but the sky is still there, in spite of everything.  Maria and Teodore's love for and devotion to each other and their children will always be unbroken.  Nothing will change it.  Events may drop upon them unannounced and with catastrophic outcomes but the family will always be unbroken. 
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

Wow, how did I miss the thing with the wolves? I have to go back and find it. Now it all makes sense. Somewhere I saw that the original title was "The Skins of Wolves and Men" (or Skins of Men and Wolves; I can't remember) And Teodor (page 333) "takes off his leather jacket, his numb hands paw at the zipper, and he sheds the unfamiliar skin stinking of swet and fear." Brilliant!
skiibunny1213 wrote:

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

 

Sunltcloud I think you have it spot on. Freedom is exactly what they are all looking for. Anna is looking for freedom from pain, responsibility and her marriage. She wants to be free like the coyotes. Stefan wants to be free of the "lowliness" of his position in life as a farmer. Maria wants to be free of worrying about feeding her kids and the fear of losing her husband. Teodor wants to be free from prison, and then he wants the freedom to make a living of his own (the land dispute) and have some fun (the liquor). The same issues apply for the children as well. The problem is, after Teodor feels betrayed by his sister and believes he has no hope for ever owning his own land, and is then caught by the police and faces time in jail again, he realizes how broken his life is and he loses hope. The heaviness of all his burdens and his anger and frustration therefrom cause him to commit the unspeakable acts he does because he realizes that only in death can he truly be free.

 

On page 303 Mitchell writes:

 

"Free. Of everything they did to him [Teodor], it was the walls that nearly drove him mad.  Not being able to see the sky.  They tried to break him by breaking his body.  Animals can be broken that way... But some beaten animals become fiercer... They die before they submit.  But still, they die." 

 

I think it is here that Teodor accepts that he will die rather than go back to prison.  When he realizes this he is at peace with his decision.  Then he comes upon the wolves and while his decision remains the same, what he sees drives him to do one last thing before he dies.  In a way I think he set her free too.


 

Distinguished Correspondent
lmpmn
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

SPOILER ALERT!
I think you're right about how Teodor set Anna free.  The book mentions several times about how one of the reasons Anna puts up with Stefan being around is because he can do for her what she can't--she's been trying to hurt herself and kill the baby and I think kill herself as well.  Instead of Stefan killing her, Teodor does and in a way frees her.

skiibunny1213 wrote:

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

 

 

On page 303 Mitchell writes:

 

"Free. Of everything they did to him [Teodor], it was the walls that nearly drove him mad.  Not being able to see the sky.  They tried to break him by breaking his body.  Animals can be broken that way... But some beaten animals become fiercer... They die before they submit.  But still, they die." 

 

I think it is here that Teodor accepts that he will die rather than go back to prison.  When he realizes this he is at peace with his decision.  Then he comes upon the wolves and while his decision remains the same, what he sees drives him to do one last thing before he dies.  In a way I think he set her free too.


 

Happiness is a warm blanket!
Frequent Contributor
mgorbatjuk
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎04-12-2008
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Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

At first I think the "Unbroken Sky" was equal to the familie's unbroken spirit. But it could also mean the the sky will never really be broken and there will always be trials and tribulations in everyone's life.
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,893
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

This discussion should probably be at the end of the book discussion, not here in this thread of "Unbroken Sky", but we've come to this point, so I'll make one more comment.....as far as I saw in the book, there was never any mention of wolves, only coyotes, whether 'wolves' was the working title, or not.  The coyotes was the only connection I saw to link Anna with Teodor in the end, as the author writes it out as physical animal traits/actions by Teodor. When I went back and reread it last night, that's what I saw.  I'll reserve further comments until we get to the ending threads of Winter.  If anyone has seen "Wolves" mentioned in this book, let me know.  I could be wrong.

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Wow, how did I miss the thing with the wolves? I have to go back and find it. Now it all makes sense. Somewhere I saw that the original title was "The Skins of Wolves and Men" (or Skins of Men and Wolves; I can't remember) And Teodor (page 333) "takes off his leather jacket, his numb hands paw at the zipper, and he sheds the unfamiliar skin stinking of swet and fear." Brilliant!
skiibunny1213 wrote:

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

 

Sunltcloud I think you have it spot on. Freedom is exactly what they are all looking for. Anna is looking for freedom from pain, responsibility and her marriage. She wants to be free like the coyotes. Stefan wants to be free of the "lowliness" of his position in life as a farmer. Maria wants to be free of worrying about feeding her kids and the fear of losing her husband. Teodor wants to be free from prison, and then he wants the freedom to make a living of his own (the land dispute) and have some fun (the liquor). The same issues apply for the children as well. The problem is, after Teodor feels betrayed by his sister and believes he has no hope for ever owning his own land, and is then caught by the police and faces time in jail again, he realizes how broken his life is and he loses hope. The heaviness of all his burdens and his anger and frustration therefrom cause him to commit the unspeakable acts he does because he realizes that only in death can he truly be free.

 

On page 303 Mitchell writes:

 

"Free. Of everything they did to him [Teodor], it was the walls that nearly drove him mad.  Not being able to see the sky.  They tried to break him by breaking his body.  Animals can be broken that way... But some beaten animals become fiercer... They die before they submit.  But still, they die." 

 

I think it is here that Teodor accepts that he will die rather than go back to prison.  When he realizes this he is at peace with his decision.  Then he comes upon the wolves and while his decision remains the same, what he sees drives him to do one last thing before he dies.  In a way I think he set her free too.


 


 

Inspired Contributor
melisndav
Posts: 37
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

This is a thread that may evolve as we progress through the novel, but can you talk about how the title "Under this Unbroken Sky" reflects the novel so far?

 

The title fits the novel very well at this point in time.  The family has moved to this new area in Canada, so the sky would be different to them due to the star alignment.  The family prays that this new area will be the beginning for a brand new life for them and they will no longer have to fight for survival. 

New User
myabbasjoy317
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-28-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

Like many others have already said, I agree that the sky is the one thing that is not broken in this novel. From time to time the book will comment on people looking up to the sky at the stars, clouds, what have you...and I think the feeling they get from that changes. Sometimes it's comforting to have a constant, and other times I think the expanse of the sky is discouraging--another reminder of how small they are, and how many obstacles they are facing, I especially feel that sentiment from Teodor and Anna.
New User
bebookworm
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎07-16-2009
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Re: Re Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

I love this book!!! I agree with your thoughts on freedom and the unbroken sky!! sigh!
Wordsmith
Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Unbroken Sky


CathyB wrote:
I too think it is a metaphor - the unbroken spirit of a human being to survive against all odds - to love, laugh and live life to its fullest
I love that!
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Unbroken Sky

The unbroken sky speaks to me of many things. It is untamed, untouched by human hands. This is similar to the land these families come to, but man can change the land. Man can break or bend the wildness of the land to grow crops, hold a house, or provide pasture for animals. But, the sky! Who can tame or break the sky? It is there to provide hope for each new day, and holds the mysteries of weather.

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Inspired Correspondent
libralady
Posts: 159
Registered: ‎09-23-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Unbroken Sky

I am keeping to the reading schedule and have therefore avoided the "spoiler alerts" posts.  To me, at least at this time, the "unbroken sky" is a metaphor for Teodor's spirit, pride and especially his dreams for a better life for his family.  Despite everything he and his family have gone through, they have endured and his spirit has not been broken, his pride has not been broken and his dreams have not been broken. 
"Sow today what you want to reap tomorrow"
MYK
Frequent Contributor
MYK
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎03-24-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

Freedom. There are no lines drawn in the sky, no boundaries. The sky is unbroken.The sky is Heaven. Where your heart cannot be broken anymore. Teodor wanted nothing more than for everyone to take care of each other. Teo was almost broken in prison. What breaks him is pages 303 to the end. As so not to spoil it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

I might have found an explanation. When I looked up coyote (canis latrans - barking dog) I found that at one time coyotes were called "prairie wolves."
KathyS wrote:

This discussion should probably be at the end of the book discussion, not here in this thread of "Unbroken Sky", but we've come to this point, so I'll make one more comment.....as far as I saw in the book, there was never any mention of wolves, only coyotes, whether 'wolves' was the working title, or not.  The coyotes was the only connection I saw to link Anna with Teodor in the end, as the author writes it out as physical animal traits/actions by Teodor. When I went back and reread it last night, that's what I saw.  I'll reserve further comments until we get to the ending threads of Winter.  If anyone has seen "Wolves" mentioned in this book, let me know.  I could be wrong.

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Wow, how did I miss the thing with the wolves? I have to go back and find it. Now it all makes sense. Somewhere I saw that the original title was "The Skins of Wolves and Men" (or Skins of Men and Wolves; I can't remember) And Teodor (page 333) "takes off his leather jacket, his numb hands paw at the zipper, and he sheds the unfamiliar skin stinking of swet and fear." Brilliant!
skiibunny1213 wrote:

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

 

Sunltcloud I think you have it spot on. Freedom is exactly what they are all looking for. Anna is looking for freedom from pain, responsibility and her marriage. She wants to be free like the coyotes. Stefan wants to be free of the "lowliness" of his position in life as a farmer. Maria wants to be free of worrying about feeding her kids and the fear of losing her husband. Teodor wants to be free from prison, and then he wants the freedom to make a living of his own (the land dispute) and have some fun (the liquor). The same issues apply for the children as well. The problem is, after Teodor feels betrayed by his sister and believes he has no hope for ever owning his own land, and is then caught by the police and faces time in jail again, he realizes how broken his life is and he loses hope. The heaviness of all his burdens and his anger and frustration therefrom cause him to commit the unspeakable acts he does because he realizes that only in death can he truly be free.

 

On page 303 Mitchell writes:

 

"Free. Of everything they did to him [Teodor], it was the walls that nearly drove him mad.  Not being able to see the sky.  They tried to break him by breaking his body.  Animals can be broken that way... But some beaten animals become fiercer... They die before they submit.  But still, they die." 

 

I think it is here that Teodor accepts that he will die rather than go back to prison.  When he realizes this he is at peace with his decision.  Then he comes upon the wolves and while his decision remains the same, what he sees drives him to do one last thing before he dies.  In a way I think he set her free too.


 

 

Scribe
debbook
Posts: 1,823
Registered: ‎05-03-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!


skiibunny1213 wrote:

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

 

Sunltcloud I think you have it spot on. Freedom is exactly what they are all looking for. Anna is looking for freedom from pain, responsibility and her marriage. She wants to be free like the coyotes. Stefan wants to be free of the "lowliness" of his position in life as a farmer. Maria wants to be free of worrying about feeding her kids and the fear of losing her husband. Teodor wants to be free from prison, and then he wants the freedom to make a living of his own (the land dispute) and have some fun (the liquor). The same issues apply for the children as well. The problem is, after Teodor feels betrayed by his sister and believes he has no hope for ever owning his own land, and is then caught by the police and faces time in jail again, he realizes how broken his life is and he loses hope. The heaviness of all his burdens and his anger and frustration therefrom cause him to commit the unspeakable acts he does because he realizes that only in death can he truly be free.

 

On page 303 Mitchell writes:

 

"Free. Of everything they did to him [Teodor], it was the walls that nearly drove him mad.  Not being able to see the sky.  They tried to break him by breaking his body.  Animals can be broken that way... But some beaten animals become fiercer... They die before they submit.  But still, they die." 

 

I think it is here that Teodor accepts that he will die rather than go back to prison.  When he realizes this he is at peace with his decision.  Then he comes upon the wolves and while his decision remains the same, what he sees drives him to do one last thing before he dies.  In a way I think he set her free too.


 

Wow, that sums it up brilliantly!
A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
"bookmagic418.blogspot.com
Inspired Contributor
skiibunny1213
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎03-16-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky - Spoiler Alert!

Regardless, I think you are right on again Sunltcloud with your pg 333 quote.  I'm so glad you mentioned it because I hadn't noticed how animalistic the description is!  Anna has been relating to the coyotes and has been acting animal-like throughout the entire novel.  The quote you mention shows how Teodor acted on animal instinct at well in the final pages of the book.  When one acts on animal instinct they become free of inhibition or worry.  Free to act as they feel without fear of/care for the consequences.  I think the coyotes are an important part of the novel because their struggles reflect the struggles of these two families and these two families sometimes act "like animals." 
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Sheltiemama
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎06-01-2009
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Re: Unbroken Sky

I live in East Tennessee, about 50 miles away from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. I've always lived here, and I can't imagine living in a place that's flat. I can't imagine looking up and seeing unbroken sky as far as you can see. It must make the world feel huge, but at the same time, I think I'd feel like I didn't have an anchor.

 

And in another sense, some of the characters haven't been "broken," but some of them have. Anna is broken mentally, and Lesya is "broken" in her mother's eyes because of her foot.