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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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kristy

Hey Kristy, that's a really good scheme with the kids. I bet they like it and you are teaching them for life.

ziki
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KristyR
Posts: 379
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: kristy

Thanks Ziki! I recently read a study concerning the number of college age kids who had no idea how to make themselves a meal. It also stated that very few ever went to a grocery store, made a shopping list, or could follow a recipe easily. They ate almost every meal out (fast food) or on campus. Fruits and vegetables (except deep fried) were almost nonexistent in their diets.
I know I didn't always eat well in college, but at least I knew how to cook for myself when I got sick of the grease and junk! I want my kids to be able to take care of themselves. I also want them to know the difference between a good meal they've prepared and the junk they eat once in a while when they're in a hurry!
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Re: kristy

That really makes the difference-if the junk is a base or if it happens now and then.
May you inspire other mothers to do the same! It is so important, the brain doesn't work well if it has not all the nutrients so I would think they'll study better, too.
It's like putting soap water in your car, you won't drive far on that.
Anyone understands that but when it comes to the body-it just gets 'forgotten'.

ziki
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jmcnaughton
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Cookbooks



KristyR wrote:
Hi, I'm new here but I thought I'd chime in. I love anything by Tyler Florence, Ina Garten and Anthony Bourdain. Anthony's cookbook is a scream, you have to sit there and read it like a book. He throws in all these little comments in the recipes - warning, don't dare admit to him you own a garlic press! I also love coffee, ice tea, and vegetarian cookbooks. I have about 4 or 5 shelves of cookbooks and I'm currently collecting kids cookbooks and teaching my kids to cook. I have kids that are 10, 7, 4, 2, and one more on the way. Weekly I'm letting each of the 3 oldest pick their own menus, make shopping lists, and then I'll help them prepare and serve their creations.




It's great how you're working with your kids to learn to cook. I grew up with Betty Crocker's Kids Cookbook. I remember Mom helping me make meatloaf with mashed potatoes and pears that looked like mice on the plate for desert for their friends. I was so proud of myself. (That was at least 40 years ago - and I still remember it like yesterday.) I'm sure your kids will have great memories of growing up and with cooking with Mom!
dg
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dg
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎10-13-2007
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Re: Cookbooks

I love Giada DiLaurentis' cookbooks, Williams Sonoma's cookbooks and Donna Hay's cookbooks. Actually I love cookbooks in general but I think those are the most straightforward books I own (and I have TONS of cookbooks). Martha Stewarts baking book is another great one, as is Dorie Greenspan's book and, although it's a small book, the Tate Bakery cookbook (not sure if that's the exact name) is terrific - everything I've made from that book gets rave reviews. The blueberry muffins are SO simple and I've been told by quite a few people that they were the best blueberry muffins they've every eaten.