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BillP
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Dinner!

I thought this might be fun... what did you make for dinner last night?

Wednesdays there's a big farmer's market so I bought some fresh eggs and the only bounty of Spring we have in Northeast... ramps. (AKA wild leeks -- very pungent.) So I made a mushroom and ramp omelet. Leftover rice from Thai takeout and leftover butterbeans rounded out the meal. I opted for adding the ramps in raw, as cooking them would make my kitchen smell like them for weeks. Now only I still smell like ramps.

-BillP, bachelor cook
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Jessica
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Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: Dinner!


BillP wrote: I thought this might be fun... what did you make for dinner last night? Wednesdays there's a big farmer's market so I bought some fresh eggs and the only bounty of Spring we have in Northeast... ramps. (AKA wild leeks -- very pungent.) So I made a mushroom and ramp omelet. Leftover rice from Thai takeout and leftover butterbeans rounded out the meal. I opted for adding the ramps in raw, as cooking them would make my kitchen smell like them for weeks. Now only I still smell like ramps. -BillP, bachelor cook


Fun!

But I totally cheated last night -- I had vegetarian bratwursts, green beans (steamed, in the bag, in the microwave), and canned biscuits.

It was good, but it reminded me that it's time for me to make some actual homemade buttermilk biscuits...

I love leeks -- I bet ramps would make an awesome leek soup!

Jessica
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caroline88
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Dinner!

Great idea, Bill!

I also totally cheated because I had a few sandwiches at work. Though not really sandwiches, might as well ask the question now that I am thinking about it.
sandwich - slice of bread with a soft crust
rolls? buns? - this is where I get confused. Some of them are soft on the outside and some of them are hard on the outside. I had nice and crunchy "buns" with raw ham and a bit of greens. It also had grains on the outside of the crust. Yummy. But there are so many kinds of bread, at least over here, and I have no idea what their english names are.

Since I was not hungry, I had a bowl of cornflakes with soy milk for "dinner".

Caroline
Belief in your mission, greet life with a cheer
There's big work to do, and that's why you are here
~ Caroline
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KristyR
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Re: Dinner!

I partially cheated last night. We had chicken cordon bleu (frozen - not homemade!), sauteed baby carrots, and raspberries. I actually made a dessert for once - fresh strawberry pie - yummy! This was a stretch for me, I knew my husband wasn't coming home for dinner, and on those days we usually just have cereal or oatmeal and toast for supper. The fruit in the refrigerator was not going to make it much longer so we had a real dinner!
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

I didn't cook last night, but went out to my favorite neighborhood restaurant -- a place that emphasizes local and seasonal ingredients. We ate... more ramps! You can't swing a cat right now without hitting some ramps. They were in a ramp custard, which sounds a little weird but was really, really good; as well as the ricotta gnocchi.

I think I might make enchiladas tomorrow for Cinco de Mayo.
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

I call anything that has two pieces of bread with stuff in between a sandwich, except hamburgers. There may be specific names -- hero, sub, grinder, torta, banh mi, reuben, etc -- but it's still a sandwich. Sandwiches may be my favorite food.



caroline88 wrote:
Great idea, Bill!

I also totally cheated because I had a few sandwiches at work. Though not really sandwiches, might as well ask the question now that I am thinking about it.
sandwich - slice of bread with a soft crust
rolls? buns? - this is where I get confused. Some of them are soft on the outside and some of them are hard on the outside. I had nice and crunchy "buns" with raw ham and a bit of greens. It also had grains on the outside of the crust. Yummy. But there are so many kinds of bread, at least over here, and I have no idea what their english names are.

Since I was not hungry, I had a bowl of cornflakes with soy milk for "dinner".

Caroline


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xAnime_Freak_Awardx
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Re: Dinner!

Pancakes and eggs....what? Can't have breakfast for dinner?? Haha.
I am what I am, I am who I am, and I will be what I will be.
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Wildflower
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Re: Dinner!

Last night my husband and I made two recipies from a recent Rachel Ray 30 minute meals episode. We made thai chicken pizza and bacon wrapped shrimp and pineapple. Both were excellent although I will probably use a different cheese next time. And the marinade used on the chicken pieces could be used for other thai recipies. It was delicious.

On Monday night we made another Food Network recipie. Guy Fieri's Mojito Chicken was and mai tais were delicious.
"It's never to late to be what you might have been" -George Eliot
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Bill_T
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Registered: ‎03-20-2007
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Re: Dinner!

I made a pasta dish last night that's become something of a weeknight favorite. We always go through a lot of broccoli florets because its one of the few green vegetables our daughter will eat. One day, trying to figure out how best to use the stems, I decided to try them in pasta, and it worked really well.

To use the broccoli stems this way, trim off the irregular ends at the bottom of the florets, and any woody part of the base. With a vegetable peeler you can pretty quickly remove the tough outer skin, leaving you with the white-green core. I cut these into quarters lengthwise and then chop into fairly small, thin pieces, about a quarter-inch thick.

So, while I'm boiling water for pasta, I take a few slices of bacon (I tend to use the Applegate Farms kind) and put them in a big, high-sided saute pan. I cook these just as I would for breakfast, then pull out before they get too crisp and set aside. I add some olive oil to the bacon fat, and then throw in a small chopped onion. When that's had a few minutes to saute, I add the broccoli pieces and then cover for a bit. Usually by now add the pasta to the water.

Once the broccoli is near-done (about 7-10 minutes) I add three cloves of minced garlic, plus the bacon, which I've chopped into small pieces. A little black pepper and salt, and that's pretty much it. Since reading Bill Buford's book Heat I've been adding a small amount of the pasta water back to the sauce, with good effects, and after I mix the pasta in with the sauce, I add a lot of grated parmesan.

It's good, and relatively quick and cheap to make.
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

Bacon and grated parmigiano reggiano... who needs broccoli? It's almost carbonara, but no egg. That sounds good, Bill.

I have to admit I haven't been cooking a lot lately, but I just got a bunch of really nice dried beans from RanchoGordo.com that I'm going to have to do something with soon. We are entering salad season.

-BP



Since reading Bill Buford's book Heat I've been adding a small amount of the pasta water back to the sauce, with good effects, and after I mix the pasta in with the sauce, I add a lot of grated parmesan.

It's good, and relatively quick and cheap to make.


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KristyR
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Re: Dinner!



Bill_T wrote:
I made a pasta dish last night that's become something of a weeknight favorite. We always go through a lot of broccoli florets because its one of the few green vegetables our daughter will eat. One day, trying to figure out how best to use the stems, I decided to try them in pasta, and it worked really well.

To use the broccoli stems this way, trim off the irregular ends at the bottom of the florets, and any woody part of the base. With a vegetable peeler you can pretty quickly remove the tough outer skin, leaving you with the white-green core. I cut these into quarters lengthwise and then chop into fairly small, thin pieces, about a quarter-inch thick.

So, while I'm boiling water for pasta, I take a few slices of bacon (I tend to use the Applegate Farms kind) and put them in a big, high-sided saute pan. I cook these just as I would for breakfast, then pull out before they get too crisp and set aside. I add some olive oil to the bacon fat, and then throw in a small chopped onion. When that's had a few minutes to saute, I add the broccoli pieces and then cover for a bit. Usually by now add the pasta to the water.

Once the broccoli is near-done (about 7-10 minutes) I add three cloves of minced garlic, plus the bacon, which I've chopped into small pieces. A little black pepper and salt, and that's pretty much it. Since reading Bill Buford's book Heat I've been adding a small amount of the pasta water back to the sauce, with good effects, and after I mix the pasta in with the sauce, I add a lot of grated parmesan.

It's good, and relatively quick and cheap to make.


Sounds good! My kids like broccoli too, but I usually end up tossing the stems. Rachael Ray has one that's similar with peas, which my kids aren't crazy about, but they will eat it because of the parmesan cheese and bowtie pasta!
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Bill_T
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Re: Dinner!

[ Edited ]
Thanks, Kristy -- I'll have to try that one on my three-year-old. She actually likes the bacon-broccoli pasta as well, and yesterday chose it over the mac-and-cheese she often demands.

As for carbonara, BillP; absolutely. But we feel pangs of cholesterol-guilt when we make that more than once in a blue moon.


KristyR wrote:


Bill_T wrote:
I made a pasta dish last night that's become something of a weeknight favorite. We always go through a lot of broccoli florets because its one of the few green vegetables our daughter will eat. One day, trying to figure out how best to use the stems, I decided to try them in pasta, and it worked really well.

To use the broccoli stems this way, trim off the irregular ends at the bottom of the florets, and any woody part of the base. With a vegetable peeler you can pretty quickly remove the tough outer skin, leaving you with the white-green core. I cut these into quarters lengthwise and then chop into fairly small, thin pieces, about a quarter-inch thick.

So, while I'm boiling water for pasta, I take a few slices of bacon (I tend to use the Applegate Farms kind) and put them in a big, high-sided saute pan. I cook these just as I would for breakfast, then pull out before they get too crisp and set aside. I add some olive oil to the bacon fat, and then throw in a small chopped onion. When that's had a few minutes to saute, I add the broccoli pieces and then cover for a bit. Usually by now add the pasta to the water.

Once the broccoli is near-done (about 7-10 minutes) I add three cloves of minced garlic, plus the bacon, which I've chopped into small pieces. A little black pepper and salt, and that's pretty much it. Since reading Bill Buford's book Heat I've been adding a small amount of the pasta water back to the sauce, with good effects, and after I mix the pasta in with the sauce, I add a lot of grated parmesan.

It's good, and relatively quick and cheap to make.


Sounds good! My kids like broccoli too, but I usually end up tossing the stems. Rachael Ray has one that's similar with peas, which my kids aren't crazy about, but they will eat it because of the parmesan cheese and bowtie pasta!

Message Edited by Bill_T on 05-23-2007 10:45 AM

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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

Summer may be three weeks away but Mother Nature has gotten a jump-start where I live and we've hit the '80s already. Last night I wanted something kind of light and whipped-up something I thought turned out really well. I had a jar of nice Spanish tuna in olive oil and used that with spaghetti. I sauteed some garlic while the pasta was cooking, and right before it finished I added the tuna and some capers. I then added the pasta to the pan I was cooking the garlic in, cooked it for a minute more.

I then turned off the heat and added some baby spinach which pretty much wilted instantly once I stirred it in. After that I put in fresh mint leaves, thinly-sliced serrano chiles, and scallions and drizzled some more olive oil in and the juice of half a lemon (or maybe more). If I do say so myself, it was really good. And I'm hoping the leftovers will be just as good cold. I see myself making this a bunch this summer.
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

Yesterday I bought asparagus and scallops from the Union Square greenmarket and then happened to find a recipe on Epicurious for just those two ingredients:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/238094

I have to say this was one of the simplest, most-delicious things I've made in a long time. So good! Part of the reason is having fresh, local asparagus that's in-season and not shipped from California or somewhere.

This may be too much information, but the "asparagus effect" stays with you much longer with super-fresh asparagus than with the typical supermarket variety.
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KristyR
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Re: Dinner!



BillP wrote:
Yesterday I bought asparagus and scallops from the Union Square greenmarket and then happened to find a recipe on Epicurious for just those two ingredients:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/238094

I have to say this was one of the simplest, most-delicious things I've made in a long time. So good! Part of the reason is having fresh, local asparagus that's in-season and not shipped from California or somewhere.

This may be too much information, but the "asparagus effect" stays with you much longer with super-fresh asparagus than with the typical supermarket variety.


That sounds really good. Do you think it would work with frozen scallops? We can't get them fresh here, and I've always been reluctant to pay the high price, not knowing if it would be worth it or not.
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!



KristyR wrote:
That sounds really good. Do you think it would work with frozen scallops? We can't get them fresh here, and I've always been reluctant to pay the high price, not knowing if it would be worth it or not.




It's not ideal, but I'm sure it would work. Just don't overcook them or they turn into hockey pucks. I think it took, including prep time (cutting the asparagus), maybe 20 minutes to prepare.
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KristyR
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Re: Dinner!



BillP wrote:


KristyR wrote:
That sounds really good. Do you think it would work with frozen scallops? We can't get them fresh here, and I've always been reluctant to pay the high price, not knowing if it would be worth it or not.




It's not ideal, but I'm sure it would work. Just don't overcook them or they turn into hockey pucks. I think it took, including prep time (cutting the asparagus), maybe 20 minutes to prepare.


Thanks for the tip!
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

I bought some garlic scapes (the stalk of the flower part of the garlic plant) at the greenmarket because they were in season (very short window) and they were in all the paper's food sections -- I am an easy target for trendy marketing I must admit.

Problem is none of the papers really said what you're supposed to do with them, so I did a little internet research and most things I found seemed to say they were good as pesto, so that's what I did. And it was really tasty. Basically you replace basil with garlic scapes in a pesto recipe, though I used walnuts instead of the traditional pine nuts. (Parmesan cheese, Olive oil, lemon, salt and pepper round it out.) Had it with penne pasta with raw tomatoes -- as the weather is starting to get really hot here, it was light and rather perfect on a humid evening.
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KristyR
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Re: Dinner!

I've never heard of garlic scapes, but the pasta dish sounds great. The article was interesting, the next up and coming food craze maybe?
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BillP
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Re: Dinner!

I hadn't either until two weeks ago when nearly every food section of local papers and magazines were talking about them. They are so seasonal, I'm not sure how much of a craze they will spawn, though.



KristyR wrote:
I've never heard of garlic scapes, but the pasta dish sounds great. The article was interesting, the next up and coming food craze maybe?