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Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Food and Traditions

With heritage heavyweight Thanksgiving coming up, what traditions involving food do you cultivate?

For me, we’re hosting Thanksgiving this year, and one thing I always make sure to have on the table is polenta. It’s my brother’s favorite and it’s one of the various side dishes I offer with corn. And, by the way, I love, love, love Thanksgiving side dishes and usually offer anywhere between 10-16. Kind of like Korean banchan, but in far larger portions.

Another tradition we have is celebrating our anniversary with omakase every year. Honestly, I’d celebrate everyday with omakase, if I could.

Tell us about your traditions!


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Frequent Contributor
Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: Food and Traditions


Maria_H wrote: With heritage heavyweight Thanksgiving coming up, what traditions involving food do you cultivate? For me, we’re hosting Thanksgiving this year, and one thing I always make sure to have on the table is polenta. It’s my brother’s favorite and it’s one of the various side dishes I offer with corn. And, by the way, I love, love, love Thanksgiving side dishes and usually offer anywhere between 10-16. Kind of like Korean banchan, but in far larger portions. Another tradition we have is celebrating our anniversary with omakase every year. Honestly, I’d celebrate everyday with omakase, if I could. Tell us about your traditions!


Maria,

Do you make your own polenta? Recipe, please!

And does everyone else love Thanksgiving as much as I do?

Some close friends of ours always host a huge dinner for all the friends who stay in town for the holiday. It's an *insane* feast and the wine flows like a river. I'm always required to bring my now-famous smashed sweet potatoes and my great grandmother's stuffing (from a 100 year old recipe).

We usually end up playing cards or games until the wee hours of the night. It's big fun, and since we've been doing it for the past 5 years, it's definitely a tradition.

What does everyone else do for the day?
Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Re: Food and Traditions -- Thanksgiving


Jessica wrote:

Do you make your own polenta? Recipe, please!


I do!

Not much of a recipe, I mostly just follow these steps and do it according to taste. My ratio is usually 3 to 4 parts liquid to 1 part polenta/cornmeal, depending on whether I want it creamy or cake-y.

Heat pan, add olive oil and butter, plus a little vegetable oil (so the olive oil and butter doesn't burn), add a lot of onions. Caramelize. Add in garlic, (sometimes mushrooms -- morels, chanterelles, oysters), add water (or stock), bring to boil. Then whisk in cornmeal, and stir. And stir. If I'm lazy, I'll let it cook 20 minutes. At the end of cooking, add grated parmesan. Though if I'm out of the expensive stuff, I'll stir pretty much any kind of cheese in there. Cheese makes life better.


Jessica wrote:

And does everyone else love Thanksgiving as much as I do?


I do!


Jessica wrote:

I'm always required to bring my now-famous smashed sweet potatoes and my great grandmother's stuffing (from a 100 year old recipe).


Interesting! Without knowing the recipe (me, that is), do you prepare it exactly as she did?


Jessica wrote:

What does everyone else do for the day?


As someone from the office noted earlier this week: It's almost Thanksgiving already?!

We're hosting! But I better get the full count, so I can reserve our bird. Tons to do, since it *is* less than two week away.


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Inspired Contributor
Jo6353
Posts: 683
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Food and Traditions



Maria_H wrote:
With heritage heavyweight Thanksgiving coming up, what traditions involving food do you cultivate?

For me, we’re hosting Thanksgiving this year, and one thing I always make sure to have on the table is polenta. It’s my brother’s favorite and it’s one of the various side dishes I offer with corn. And, by the way, I love, love, love Thanksgiving side dishes and usually offer anywhere between 10-16. Kind of like Korean banchan, but in far larger portions.

Another tradition we have is celebrating our anniversary with omakase every year. Honestly, I’d celebrate everyday with omakase, if I could.

Tell us about your traditions!


When my 5 children were small I would always let them each pick a side dish to have for Thanksgiving. I was the one time that we suspended the try a bite of everything rule. As long as the had at least 3 different things on their plate it was fine. Now that they're grown I still have Thanksgiving at my house and I provide the basics plus I always try one new dish every year. Everyone brings something so it's different every year. Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday.
Frequent Contributor
Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: Food and Traditions -- Thanksgiving Stuffing

The stuffing is so simple, so I do make it the same way my great grandmother did.

Basically -- you rip up two big loaves of (some kind of white) bread into approx. 2" chunks and let them sit out overnight and dry out. The next day, throw it all in the biggest bowl you can find. Add salt and pepper to taste, a heaping handful of dried sage, and enough melted butter and eggs to make it all stick together. Stuff it up a turkey.

But I always make it as a side dish. Just press it into a covered glass dish and bake for about 30 minutes.

It is Duh-Licious!
Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Re: Food and Traditions


Jo6353 wrote:
When my 5 children were small I would always let them each pick a side dish to have for Thanksgiving. I was the one time that we suspended the try a bite of everything rule. As long as the had at least 3 different things on their plate it was fine. Now that they're grown I still have Thanksgiving at my house and I provide the basics plus I always try one new dish every year. Everyone brings something so it's different every year. Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday.



That's a terrific way to suspend house/table rules for the day. What new dish are you planning for this year?


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Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Re: Food and Traditions -- Thanksgiving Stuffing



Jessica wrote:
The stuffing is so simple, so I do make it the same way my great grandmother did.

Basically -- you rip up two big loaves of (some kind of white) bread into approx. 2" chunks and let them sit out overnight and dry out. The next day, throw it all in the biggest bowl you can find. Add salt and pepper to taste, a heaping handful of dried sage, and enough melted butter and eggs to make it all stick together. Stuff it up a turkey.

But I always make it as a side dish. Just press it into a covered glass dish and bake for about 30 minutes.

It is Duh-Licious!




Bread. Butter. Eggs. Salt. Heat.

That just might be the perfect combination of ingredients.


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