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BN Editor
BookClubEditor
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Introduce Yourself

Welcome to the Cooking, Food, & Drinks Book Club!

Reply to this message to introduce yourself to other readers. Let us know what types of books you like the most in this subject, and don't forget to recommend your all-time favorites!

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gwillis01
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

This is Gwin Willis and a couple of my favorite cookbooks are The Chocolate Cake Doctor (which my aunt has) and the Joy of Cooking (which my mother has). My mother is a BIG fan of the late Julia Child and has her "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" book and all of her "French Chef" cooking videos on DVD and VHS. I especially like J. Child's chocolate mousse recipe (from one of her French Chef episodes that aired long ago on PBS). I guess that's my all-time favorite dessert, which is best served with these "ladyfinger" cakes.
Gwin Willis
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gwillis01
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello, my daughter placed me here. I am an 80 year old retired physician and mother of Gwin Willis. Forty years ago when Gwin appeared it seemed necessary to cook for a family of four. Julia Child had her TV series going by then and I thought it was very informative. She was not just a source of recipes; she was a source of how and why the foods reacted to the way they were handled, a technique I found most informative and useful. She had an attractive zest for cooking, which fit the TV format.
Gwin Willis
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Bulova
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello, This is Caroline and in our community we have a woman delivering her organic vegetables to the ones interested. Her commitment goes that far that she provides us with a sort of "grandmother's nature recipes" in case of illness giving exact indications of how to prepare the corresponding vegetable - and even including it as a try to our order. I like cooking for its health and taste aspects and look forward joining this book club. Caroline
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ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Welcome, Caroline, Gwin and Gwin's mom! We're delighted to have you in the club. There have been a number of people participating in other forums who probably won't reintroduce themselves. If you complete your profile with some biographical information it's a helpful reminder.

Caroline, can you give us an example of one of the recipes your friend provided? I'm interested to know how people get their food--supermarket, local farms, gardens, community supported agriculture, farmer's market, warehouse store, coop? Including recipes with ingredients that may be unfamiliar is great--that's another way you can use this club.
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Bulova
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recipe against cold, cough

Hi Jonathan, I'm happy to give you the recipe against cold, cough:
Ingredients: black radish, raw cane sugar
Preparation: a black radish is hollowed out and filled with raw cane sugar. Put the radish onto a warm place (radiator or in slightly temperate oven for approx. one day in order to brew. Take daily one tablespoon of the so formed syrup.
It's a very simple, but effective recipe (but the taste is not overwhelmingly good).
Kind regards, Caroline

Welcome, Caroline, Gwin and Gwin's mom! We're delighted to have you in the club. There have been a number of people participating in other forums who probably won't reintroduce themselves. If you complete your profile with some biographical information it's a helpful reminder.Caroline, can you give us an example of one of the recipes your friend provided? I'm interested to know how people get their food--supermarket, local farms, gardens, community supported agriculture, farmer's market, warehouse store, coop? Including recipes with ingredients that may be unfamiliar is great--that's another way you can use this club
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ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: Recipe against cold, cough

Hi Caroline, thanks for this recipe--I've not seen much black radish around in the US. Do others have medicinal recipes to share?
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Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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hi from ziki

Hello to all!
I'll hope we'll have some stewing pot of fun here.

I had no intention whatsoever to have anything to do with any more cookbooks. I had tons of them already and I didn't use them very often after all. But when I read the conversation about the Joy of Cooking on BNBC I became curious. I bought the book and i don't regret it. It's inspiring and both basic and very informative. It succesfully covers a very wide field.

Moreover, it also caused a whole avalanche of new cookbooks streaming into my house....

As I said to Bob, the moderator on the American Classics section here on BNBC, who I hope will join us, I got rid of eight older cookbooks in the past few days but the new books are bigger so it left me in the red when it comes to free book shelf space.

Thanks to the B&N thread on the Joy of Cooking I also realized that I was always interested in cooking, I just never fully or consciously acknowledged that. I think the sense of home is connected to kitchen and I have many memories of my grand mother that are connected to kitchen and her cooking. Food was important to our family. A kind of bridge over all dysfunctions, LOL.

However, when I moved from home I hardly knew how to boil an egg. I took a course in a local college and I learned the basics there. When I became vegetarian I ventured into that realm with an interest of a zealot and now after many years when I started to eat meat again I didn't quite know how to cook that properly. I still experiment even if veggies remain my favorites.

I also like baking. Unfortunately that was recently restricted a lot because I learned that I do not tolerate gluten. I have to tweak many recipes and even if moderately susccessful it is never quite the same. I find it boring, I must say.

I am in need of eager eaters, LOL. Actually at times I bake for the nearest homeless shelter. Once the idea of cooking for others was a sheer nightmare to me. I thought I wouldn't be able to please them but the disasters over the years were comparatively few.

I am looking forward to meeting you, all glorious cooks!

ziki :-)
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'gwillises' .-)



gwillis01 wrote:
Julia Child had her TV series going by then and I thought it was very informative. She was not just a source of recipes; she was a source of how and why the foods reacted to the way they were handled, a technique I found most informative and useful.




Hi and welcome both of you.

I just got a book called 'Baking' and there it is explaned what a difference the WAY you make something can make. In this particular case the lemon cream as opposed to lemon curd.

Cooking is an universe!
Tell us more stories from your long cooking life, please!

French cooking scares me. They are so very particular about it therefore I didn't yet ventured into that corner. Did you notice that any time you see a French movie not long time passes before they are all gathered around some 'food situation'.

ziki
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Bulova
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Just wanted to mention that I also buy food at the supermarket according to the occasion and to me, all of them have their advantages may it be time, money saving, range of choice and budget available. Regards, Caroline
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ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: 'gwillises' .-)

Gwin and Ziki, I think you'll both be really interested in the Julie/Julia bookclub that is scheduled to open on January 8th. Julie Powell, the author who will be joining us, cooked every recipe (524) in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking over the course of a year and tells great stories about that year. And Ziki, it may make French food more approachable for you. A lot of people think it's fancy, and it can be, but a lot of French food is all about a simple showcasing of great ingredients. Until you get to a duck en croute anyway...
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Julia



ChefJon wrote:... Until you get to a duck en croute anyway...



ROFL, there you go... that's what I mean...voila...

I think I might go "ziki cooks with joy no matter what" just modelling after Julie and Julia... J&J definitely sounds like a fun book to read.I also liked what you said about it in the intro there.I would probably have the same initial suspicious reaction to it.

ziki
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ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: Julia

While B&N pays the bill, I've been encouraged to speak freely. I think you'll REALLY like the Julie/Julia book. I'm glad to see you logged in and posted over there.
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Bulova
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: 'gwillises' .-) / French Cooking

As to French Cooking, I personally don't think there should be anything to be scared of. I've been to France this year though and my teenage son was outraged by French cooking and other rather free habits (music). As to me, French cooking simply means that one has to eat and that the French one day simply decided that giving names to menus could be something as nice as writing a poem (about the ingredients). The name of a French menu can therefore be extremely long - and the food fine in taste. Hope I didn't offend any French person with this personal experience.
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ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: 'gwillises' .-) / French Cooking

Thanks, Gwin, I agree--I think it's important to distinguish from French home cooking and even neighborhood restaurant (bistro) cooking, which can be as simple as a vegetable soup, steak and fries, or roast chicken with roast vegetables, and French haute cuisine, fine (high) cooking, that may involve many pots, many pureed and strained items, truffles, and possibly a duck press. There are also many foods that most people in France eat casually but simply don't make at home. I've done both types of cooking and gravitate towards the simple, but the problem comes from conflating the two. No one's getting home from work in the evening and making a pate en croute, but they may be picking up a slice from the shop near the train station. But out of context it gets confusing. Because a lot of these recipes show up together in French cookbooks, especially those written for markets outside of France, a lot of people are unnecessarily intimidated.
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French Cooking



ChefJon wrote:
Thanks, Gwin, I agree--I think it's important to distinguish from French home cooking and even neighborhood restaurant (bistro) cooking, which can be as simple as a vegetable soup, steak and fries, or roast chicken with roast vegetables, and French haute cuisine, fine (high) cooking, that may involve many pots, many pureed and strained items, truffles, and possibly a duck press. There are also many foods that most people in France eat casually but simply don't make at home. I've done both types of cooking and gravitate towards the simple, but the problem comes from conflating the two. No one's getting home from work in the evening and making a pate en croute, but they may be picking up a slice from the shop near the train station. But out of context it gets confusing. Because a lot of these recipes show up together in French cookbooks, especially those written for markets outside of France, a lot of people are unnecessarily intimidated.




Wise post, thanks. I also wonder how it is in today's France. I haven't been there lately. I wonder how the cooking works in families. I wouldn't think they are totally immune to the speeding pace of life in general and even if big Mac is transformed into a 'sub'it is the fast food French way anyhow. Julia's French cookbook was written a while ago and a lot changed since then.

There's alsothe French Haute Couture and that doesn't mean that everyone on the street wears thee latest Dior creation. But it provides inspiration to Pret-a-Porte etc...all the way down to H&M.

I guess the French have a reputation to be sofisticated about their taste and maybe also the reputation to be snobs at times. Both when it comes to clothing and food and culture. perhaps they are just refined, or it is the culture as such they imbibe.

I think (=guess as it is right now not having read it yet) books like Julie &Julia help me to shatter my preconceived ideas.

ziki
La
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La
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi, everyone!

I'm La. I'm an aspiring chef at the age of 24. : ] I can't wait for the day when I can cook like my grandmother or great aunt (both amazing!). I'm trying new recipes and techniques as often as possible.

I'm looking forward to posting with you guys!

much love,
la
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Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi, Glen's mom. I couldn't help but post you a message. I'm currently reading Julia Child My Life In France. If you haven't picked it up yet, you must. It is autobiographical. Julia does a wonderful job as usual with descripions of food, places and people. It facinating to learn about her life with Paul and the incrediable work she put into her first book. She had a great sense of humor as well. Let me know if you give it a read.
Let's Eat,
FoodieBrooke
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ChefJon
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Welcome La and Brooke--I'm glad you're joining the club. Feel free to visit the other threads and post questions or start your own!
Reader 2
RochRN
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello- I am a 37 yo ICU nurse who usually doesn't read a lot of books abiout cooking, food or drinks. I decided to read the Hershey book mostly because Hershey is about 45 miles away from where I live. I have only read about 35 pages so far but I am fascinated by all the history that has taken place practically in my back yard. I am hoping to keep up with all of you! My motto is: Just because I have a collection of cookbooks, doesn't mean I use them!!
Rochelle