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Author
Paula-Wolfert
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
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Re: Paula Wolfert to visit: October 28 & 29.

 

Hi Valerie,

 

I do remember spending some incredible time with you during our Oldways Moroccan trip.

 

You ask about your Rif tagine. Sounds as if you have a problem of mold which can develop on clay pots. Your Riffian tagine is completely porous so when wet it needs to be  allowed to dry out thoroughly before storing or covering the bottom section. To clean it and to prevent it from happening again, simply wash the pot with vinegar and scrub with a paste of coarse salt or baking soda and water. If you’re concerned about bacterial growth, use the French country cook’s method: rub your earthenware pot with garlic before each use; many claim this confers natural antimicrobial protection.

 

Thanks everyone for visiting and sharing your thoughts about clay pot cooking with me.

Paula

 

New User
Coyotepots
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Paula Wolfert to visit: October 28 & 29.

I'd like to add to the comments about possible mold on clay pots, that this would happen only on unglazed pots.  The glass/glaze surface of glazed pots doesn't support growth of molds. 

Clay Coyote Pottery
Clay Pots for Cooking
http://claycoyote.com
New User
FrancescainWoodinville
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-02-2009
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Re: Paula Wolfert to visit: October 28 & 29

Just to let Seattle residents know, Italian Country Home and Kitchen in Woodinville, WA has a huge selection of Vulcania terracotta cookware from Tuscany.  Their Website is www.italiancountryantiques.com

 

Francesca

New User
ToqueBlanche
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-30-2009
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Re: Paula Wolfert to visit: October 28 & 29.

Re: Lead in clay cookware.  Our sister company imports the Chamba cookware from Colombia that Paula mentions.  Chamba is a handmade, all-natural product with no glazes at all.  The FDA checks the products upon entry to the U.S. to make sure the clay itself is lead-free. --Charles from Toque Blanche, www/MyToque.com