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krenea1
Posts: 356
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for The Wine Diva

Once you open a bottle of wine how long does it typically keep?
Karen Renea

Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back
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The_Wine_Diva
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎02-21-2007
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Re: Questions for The Wine Diva

While a carafe is "usable" it doesn't provide much room to swirl around the wine and get lots of bubbles to form, which is the whole purpose -- i.e., to aerate the wine....which softens it so it will feel soft and silky in your mouth.

Better to spend a few dollars more and get a decanter. The best shape is called a "captain's" decanter. It got that name when sea captains in the 1800's needed a container to aerate their wine that wouldn't tip over as the ship swayed to and 'fro. A carafe shape, or a bottle of wine could easily topple right over. But the captain's decanter is VERY broad at the bottom, probably a good 6 inches in diameter. So as the ship tossed it would just slide across the table, hopefully, never reaching the edge!
A meal without wine is called breakfast!

The Wine Diva
Author & Wine Educator

www.thewinediva.com
Author
The_Wine_Diva
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎02-21-2007
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Re: Questions for The Wine Diva

Leftover wines are like houseguests....they start to fade in a day or two.

Reds keep longer then whites when opened and you just stick the cork back in. Figure an opened bottle of white wine will last at most one to two days (in the fridge) and two to three days for a red (which does not need to go in the fridge). But remember, you've just made a hole in the cork with a corkscrew, and when just stick the cork back in, it's not airtight....so air is going to get into the wine which starts it on a downward spiral of deterioration (oxidation).

There are other devices that you can use to save your wine that will allow you to keep it for several more days. Turn to pages 135-136 in my book for the detailed explanation, but here's the short form:

1--Use empty screw cap Perrier or metal stoppered beer bottles to keep your leftover wine absolutely airtight and drinkable for up to a week.

2--Private Preserve Wine Preserver injects a gas over the wine and acts like a blanket tucking the wine into bed!

3--Vacu-Vin pump and rubber stopper. Pumps the air out of the bottle.
A meal without wine is called breakfast!

The Wine Diva
Author & Wine Educator

www.thewinediva.com