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BookClubEditor
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The Joy of Cooking

  1. Do you own a copy of The Joy of Cooking? How long have you had it?

  2. Do you have any special stories associated with this classic cookbook?

Reply to this message to discuss any of these topics. Or start your own new topic by clicking "New Message."

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Muguets2001
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Hi! Some years ago (I won't say how many) I bought the Fanny Farmer and it was my bible. Later on, I splurged and also got The Joy of Cooking. It's become my bible. Two years ago, I purchased brand new 5 copies of "The Joy of Cooking" and delighted my 3 nieces and 2 nephews for Christmas with them. They loved it! Going off to University and on their own, they really appreciated something that they can use over and over.

I love it for its simplicity, completeness, variety. Being a Maritimer, my father was the "lobster" chef and we never really paid attention to what he did with the little critters. We just regaled in the finished product. The book has detailed descriptions of all ingredients and what one can expect to do with them. Very nice indeed.



Doris
Doris

Life is good ... la vie est belle ...
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Thanks, Doris, what a great aunt you are! I agree that if you're going to give one cookbook as a gift, then Joy is a good one!
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Muguets2001
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Thanks, Chef Jon. I have to admit, it was a different gift for them. We're several sisters and it took me some time to figure out what to get them. I was browsing through the bookstore and realized how much I love my cook books and thought, they're becoming young adults going away from home and all ... and how much these cost. So I got these not knowing how they would go over as a "Christmas gift". They were absolutely delighted! What was all the more fun is that my nephews are the ones who reported trying recipes more than the nieces. :smileyhappy:
Doris

Life is good ... la vie est belle ...
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Great story, Doris, three cheers for men in the kitchen!

Do they have any signature recipes or favorites from the book?

And more importantly, have they cooked for you?!?!
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Everyman
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Re: The Joy of Cooking



BookClubEditor wrote:

  1. Do you own a copy of The Joy of Cooking? How long have you had it?


  2. Do you have any special stories associated with this classic cookbook?



Reply to this message to discuss any of these topics. Or start your own new topic by clicking "New Message."





My parents gave me the two-volume paperback Joy of Cooking when I moved into my first apartment. Dare I say that that was more thna forty years ago? I still have the books, and I still consult them regularly. They are plain old basic America cooking, which, with all respect to our French trained chefs or nouvelle cuisine, is still my preferred eating.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Thanks, Everyman, welcome to the forum! What are your favorite recipes from the book?
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Today's (11/1) New York Times has an article on the front page of the food section by Kim Severson called "Does the World Need Another Joy? Do You?" http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/01/dining/01joy.html?_r=1&ref=dining&oref=slogin

Well Do You?

The new Joy was officially released yesterday! What do you think of it? Will you buy it? If you have it, please give us your review!
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JoanMargaret
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

I just read the NY Times review of the 75th anniversary Joy of Cooking. That review inspired me to locate a copy of the 1975 JOC (my copy is from 1963), which sounds as though it might be the best compromise.

Although it was once my cooking bible, I don't refer to the Joy of Cooking that often anymore; but when I need the answer to some basic cooking questions, there is nothing like it.

Joan
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BookJunkie
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

I received Joy as a present when I graduated from high school. At the time, the running joke was that I was capable of burning water.

Since then, I've learned to cook ... mostly by experimenting ... but I still go back to Joy, much the same way I would an encyclopedia. I tend to use it the most for basics -- dough, tomato sauce, etc -- and then I throw in my own finishing touches on top of that.

Now that I think about it though, I should pick it up and make something!
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Thanks for sharing and welcome to the forum. I use Joy (old and now new) in much the same way. Usually I have a vision for what I want to cook and don't use recipes but when given an ingredient and short of ideas, Joy, along with Silver Spoon, is one of my go-to cookbooks. I used to belong to a CSA (community supported agriculture) and was getting weekly deliveries of veggies I don't love or use that often: radishes, kohlrabi, rutabaga. So Joy became a good friend in helping me through my hundredth braised radish of the season!
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Rosebear
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

I was lucky enough to marry a guy who had copies of Joy and Julia Child's "The French Chef Cookbook." He was lucky enough to marry someone interested in reading and testing cookbooks. I love my very worn copy of Joy, I gave my mother one... It answers odd questions reliably and has helped me dozens of times. I still rely on it for reference material when I venture into the culinary "frontier." Whether hunting for a substitute for an ingredient, or how to clean game, Joy has it all!
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Skyler97
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

[ Edited ]
I actually have two copies. One from the late 70's and one from the mid 90's. I keep both copies as I like the first's Emeril like "Pork Fat-centric" recipies, and Old fashioned culinary advice and the others ethnic cooking menu's. I frequently use both when seeking to do something like baking bread or cooking an Omelet.

I'm thinking about getting a copy as a College Graduation gift for my nephew. As I've discovered, women appreciate a man who helps with the cooking or better yet does it all himself.

Favorite Recipe: Country Captain.

Message Edited by Skyler97 on 11-03-200603:41 PM

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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Country Captain! I have to confess I've heard of the dish but didn't really know what it was beyond some chickeny thing. Fortunately today I received the new JOY! And there it is (p. 434).

I'm wondering what people think of the new edition. I haven't had much time to spend with it yet, but really like Anne Mendelson's introductory chapter on the history of the book, some of the old recipes preserved with the opening anecdotes and I also really like the "Know Your Ingredients" section. After all, these days it's easy to find a good recipe for just about anything online so it's a good move that in this edition some of the things that make JOY interesting reading and a go-to reference such as the line illustrations, how-to asides, and explanations of what to look for in certain ingredients are preserved.

Tonight I'll try to cook from it: codfish cakes?

But after all this, my prediction? The next JOY will be a facsimile of the first or second edition--the most interesting recipes to me are the old classics like shrimp wiggle and the Rombauer Special chocolate cake.
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Laura Shapiro offers a witty and thoughtful critique of the new JOY while providing some history. What do you think?

http://www.slate.com/id/2152620/?nav=tap3

While I agree with her about the canned soups I do love the shrimp wiggle!
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Re: The Joy of Cooking



ChefJon wrote:
Laura Shapiro offers a witty and thoughtful critique of the new JOY while providing some history. What do you think?

http://www.slate.com/id/2152620/?nav=tap3

While I agree with her about the canned soups I do love the shrimp wiggle!




Hmmm.... interesting read...

Any page on canned soup is bound to be odious. I am not going out to shoot bear either and I am not sure I need any education on all shapes of pasta....help. Joy is ordered and didn't arived yet..now I sure wonder what's cooking.

ziki
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MaggieGreen
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Did anyone read the front page article in Saturday's Wall Street Journal about chefs using canned ingredients? It was very interesting, and you might be surprised who is using Heinz ketchup, instant potato flakes and gravy master in their food.

You made the right choice about buying a copy of JOY, and you'll be glad you bought the book. Out of 4500 recipes, 25 contain canned soup, and 5 of those give an alternative choice for a homemade sauce. Laura Shaperio's critique in my opinion was not fair. She cooked one recipe. Why didn't she make the "authentic" chicken curry, also in JOY? JOY gives readers choices - many, many choices - depending on how much time you have, and your skill level in cooking.
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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ChefJon
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

Thanks, Maggie, it's great to have your perspective on this. I've let Laura Shapiro know about this forum--maybe she'll log on! When I was working in the restaurant business we always used to say, "There's no such thing as bad press." Even after bad reviews, people go to restaurants they read about. But the Shapiro's Slate review is one of many, so Maggie, share some others with us!
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MaggieGreen
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Re: The Joy of Cooking

We completely agree - any press written about the anniversary edition, especially when it includes a picture of the cover of the book, is a really good thing. When the New York Times published an article on November 1st, 2/3 of the front page of the Dining section was a photograph of a very large stack of Joy of Cooking books. That amount of free press and photos is priceless.

The JOY continues to sell very well. We are #3 on the New York Times bestseller list for December 10th, and 99.5 % of the print article reviews have been very positive. In general, most are happy JOY has returned with the classic reference material updated and revised. If you do a Google News search for "joy of cooking" you will find a link to most articles written in print. Blogs can also be searched with Google. Those are fun to read as well, and the blogging community of talking about JOY too.
Maggie Green
Editor
75th Anniversary Edition
Joy of Cooking
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Re: The Joy of Cooking=good choice

Thank you for your comment, Maggie. Lovely and so accurate. My book's taking its time, probably due to the pre Christmas snail mail traffic (I ordered on line).

Fact is that food is such a primal thing and it can have a lot with habits to do. People get used to certain foods and innovations can be both welcomed and resented.
I think people are bound to make very different comments that are often emotionally colored both about the cook books and the food cooked.

I agree with you that it is good to experiment and try different approaches and recipes. It will always be so with any cook books, there will be favorites and there will be recipes that one will not repeat. I use small golden stars that I paste by the recipe's name when I liked it and want to use it again.

I have an old cook book after my GGmother and there are plenty of weird things. One of them is cooked cow's brains. I guess we wouldn't risk eating it today with the prospect of mad cows disease in sight but it definitely makes for an interesting reading.
The way I hear you speaking about the book Joy has both, the practicalities and the 'entertainment'.

ziki