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Further reading

Hi Ilana, could BN provide a reading list (as it used to be) books that are somehow connected to this theme, time etc.

thanks
ziki
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Re: Further reading

[ Edited ]
No help's forthcoming from BN :-(

Search ideas from Norton:

# Literary Impressionism
# Julia van Gunsteren, [The Aesthetics of Literary Impressionism]
# Ian Watt, [Impressionism and Symbolism in Ford, Conrad, and Crane]
# John A. Meixner, [Ford’s Literary Technique]
# Joseph Conrad, Preface to The **bleep** of the "Narcissus" (1897)
# Henry James, [The House of Fiction]
# Ford Madox Hueffer [Ford], On Impressionism
- First Article
- Second Article
# Ford Madox Ford, [Developing the Theory of Impressionism with Conrad]
- Techniques

matz

Message Edited by ziki on 02-13-200705:45 PM

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LitEditor
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Re: Further reading

Ziki -- I didn't realize this hadn't been posted: see here.

See the latest news about book clubs in the Book Clubs Blog.
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Re: Further reading

Thanks.
z.
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cosmotrotter
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Re: Further reading

Ziki

Completely different literary era, but you may want to check out the Alexandria Quartet by Lawrence Durrell, who uses similar techniques of restarting narrative from the vantage point of secondary characters (calling it, I believe, veritiginious

Also, Anthony Powell's Dance to the Music of Time, while very long, a) deploys a similar ironically detached narrator-observer reporting on his own life, b) contains much dark and light humor on class, continentals, etc., and c) after much description with little insight, ultimately offers very little into the psychology of men wanting women. In short, Powell's narrator (Jenkins?) seems to take up FMF's Dowell's torch in some ways. Being British, however, he never falls prey to Dowell's American self-delusions of sentiment. Comments, Choisya? :smileywink:
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Re: Further reading

[ Edited ]
Hi Cosmo,
very sweet of you, thanks. This goes into my modernist file. He called England the Pudding Island...now, I like that.

He looks sexy here:
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780571172481&itm=2

ziki :-)

Message Edited by ziki on 02-21-200709:44 PM

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Choisya
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Re: Further reading

LOL Cosmotrotter. I think there is also a bit of England-my-England about Durrell, the expatriate on Corfu. Anthony Powell is perhaps a better example. Perhaps most expatriates eventually idolise their native lands?




cosmotrotter wrote:
Ziki

Completely different literary era, but you may want to check out the Alexandria Quartet by Lawrence Durrell, who uses similar techniques of restarting narrative from the vantage point of secondary characters (calling it, I believe, veritiginious

Also, Anthony Powell's Dance to the Music of Time, while very long, a) deploys a similar ironically detached narrator-observer reporting on his own life, b) contains much dark and light humor on class, continentals, etc., and c) after much description with little insight, ultimately offers very little into the psychology of men wanting women. In short, Powell's narrator (Jenkins?) seems to take up FMF's Dowell's torch in some ways. Being British, however, he never falls prey to Dowell's American self-delusions of sentiment. Comments, Choisya? :smileywink:


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cosmotrotter
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Re: Further reading

You may be right - or should I say 'quite right' :smileywink: , Choisya.
As a frequent and current expat who feigns to detest the dominant culture current in his native land, I also find that I am usually well-placed within my ingrained culture - even where I would have thought myself more cosmopolitan. Reading what seem to be fatuous textbooks on Intercultural Communication in the Business World sometimes teaches more than initially meets the eye. The more I experience, the more ignorant I learn myself to be! Or something of the sort. But you were speaking of artists, and I have reduced the discussion to nostalgia.



Choisya wrote:
LOL Cosmotrotter. I think there is also a bit of England-my-England about Durrell, the expatriate on Corfu. Anthony Powell is perhaps a better example. Perhaps most expatriates eventually idolise their native lands?




cosmotrotter wrote:
Ziki

Completely different literary era, but you may want to check out the Alexandria Quartet by Lawrence Durrell, who uses similar techniques of restarting narrative from the vantage point of secondary characters (calling it, I believe, veritiginious

Also, Anthony Powell's Dance to the Music of Time, while very long, a) deploys a similar ironically detached narrator-observer reporting on his own life, b) contains much dark and light humor on class, continentals, etc., and c) after much description with little insight, ultimately offers very little into the psychology of men wanting women. In short, Powell's narrator (Jenkins?) seems to take up FMF's Dowell's torch in some ways. Being British, however, he never falls prey to Dowell's American self-delusions of sentiment. Comments, Choisya? :smileywink:





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Choisya
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Re: Further reading

'Quaite raite' Cosmotrotter:smileyhappy: Maybe you are still too young to idolise your native land:smileyhappy:




cosmotrotter wrote:
You may be right - or should I say 'quite right' :smileywink: , Choisya.
As a frequent and current expat who feigns to detest the dominant culture current in his native land, I also find that I am usually well-placed within my ingrained culture - even where I would have thought myself more cosmopolitan. Reading what seem to be fatuous textbooks on Intercultural Communication in the Business World sometimes teaches more than initially meets the eye. The more I experience, the more ignorant I learn myself to be! Or something of the sort. But you were speaking of artists, and I have reduced the discussion to nostalgia.



Choisya wrote:
LOL Cosmotrotter. I think there is also a bit of England-my-England about Durrell, the expatriate on Corfu. Anthony Powell is perhaps a better example. Perhaps most expatriates eventually idolise their native lands?




cosmotrotter wrote:
Ziki

Completely different literary era, but you may want to check out the Alexandria Quartet by Lawrence Durrell, who uses similar techniques of restarting narrative from the vantage point of secondary characters (calling it, I believe, veritiginious

Also, Anthony Powell's Dance to the Music of Time, while very long, a) deploys a similar ironically detached narrator-observer reporting on his own life, b) contains much dark and light humor on class, continentals, etc., and c) after much description with little insight, ultimately offers very little into the psychology of men wanting women. In short, Powell's narrator (Jenkins?) seems to take up FMF's Dowell's torch in some ways. Being British, however, he never falls prey to Dowell's American self-delusions of sentiment. Comments, Choisya? :smileywink:








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expats



Choisya wrote: Perhaps most expatriates eventually idolise their native lands?





I think there might be stages...you leave a country and think you end up some place better (make an idol of it). Then according to the law 'grass is green everywhere' you discover the new caontry has it faults, too, and so you idolize the old one....and perhaps eeven go back just to discover it is not so pink, which you knew anyhow....

...to sum it up: one can't run away (unless there are political reasons and torture and stuff like that so the person comes to better conditions in that respect).

ziki
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