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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Portraits of women

The women are contrasted.

Florence is talking-talking-talking and vulgar, she had a shameful indecent affair (she's American) and Leonora is 'mute' and composed, desires decorum and establishment (she's English), suffers stoically with no sex

In one scene Leonora is blond in a dark dress facing Nancy with dark hair and white kimono.

Mrs. Basil is solid while Maisie Maidan is presented as rather insubstantial.

FMF was married several times and I wonder if these portraits are colored by his own attitudes toward women (I'd think so). None of the women is presented with much sympathy. They are there like statists fluttering around the two forlorn men making their lives into hell.

I am not sure if I can let FMF get away with this :-p

ziki
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Portraits of women

And Lenora is Catholic, whereas I 'm not sure we ever learn much about Florence's religious beliefs, do we?
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Portraits of women

Good observation ziki:smileyhappy:




ziki wrote:
The women are contrasted.

Florence is talking-talking-talking and vulgar, she had a shameful indecent affair (she's American) and Leonora is 'mute' and composed, desires decorum and establishment (she's English), suffers stoically with no sex

In one scene Leonora is blond in a dark dress facing Nancy with dark hair and white kimono.

Mrs. Basil is solid while Maisie Maidan is presented as rather insubstantial.

FMF was married several times and I wonder if these portraits are colored by his own attitudes toward women (I'd think so). None of the women is presented with much sympathy. They are there like statists fluttering around the two forlorn men making their lives into hell.

I am not sure if I can let FMF get away with this :-p

ziki


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