Serenity gardens offer a retreat from the rat-race, a place to meditate or pray, or to foster the healing process. Some may be drawn to the minimalist lines of a Japanese-style garden, while others may prefer a water garden, a fragrant herb garden, or an old-fashioned knot garden

 

It helps to see examples of other gardens if you're trying to come up with ideas for creating your own serenity garden. I've always been drawn to gazebos and secret places off the garden path, but those require a fairly large space. Even if you're in an apartment with just a deck or balcony, you can transform that small space into a corner of Shangri-La. Here are five great books to help you get started. 

 

 

 

 

 

New Zen Garden 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shady Retreats 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landscape as Spirit 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sacred Gardens 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Medicine Wheel Garden 

Comments
by Choisya on ‎11-14-2009 12:23 PM

I often wonder how people keep their gravel in neat patterns when they rake a Zen garden Becke and how they keep cats from creating a different sort of picture altogether!:smileysurprised:

 

You may be interested in this Daily Telegraph article (and videos) about their 'serenity' Zen garden at Chelsea last year.

by Moderator becke_davis on ‎11-15-2009 12:15 AM

Good point, Choisya -- I think they'd have to live in a no-cat zone (and good luck with that). The raccoons would create their own sand art if I tried that. There's a very cool Japanese garden at the Chicago Botanic Garden, though, and it's always neatly raked. I love the look, but wouldn't want the maintenance.

 

I've written several features on different types of healing gardens, and I'm amazed how helpful they can be. I was quoted here, but don't think the actual article is online:

 http://blog.lib.umn.edu/efans/ygnews/2009/01/landscapes_with_healing_in_min.html

 

Thanks so much for the article on the Chelsea Flower Show. I can't believe than in all the years I lived there, I never made it to the show. Probably because it happened around the same time as London Fashion Week, which my job was connected to, back in those days. I have a friend who sends me calendars from the show so I can enjoy it vicariously!

About Garden Variety: The BN Gardening Blog
Welcome to Garden Variety, a common ground for gardening enthusiasts in the B&N community. Each day, our resident experts, guest bloggers, and B&N staff produce articles on evergreen topics and growing trends in the realm of landscaping. From seasonal plants and edible gardens to book suggestions and landscape innovations, this is the place where ideas flourish.

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