Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

 

 

The Oxford Companion to the Garden 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis

Now available for the first time in paperback, the magnificent Oxford Companion to the Garden illuminates the history and design of gardens all over the world, from the earliest recorded known examples to the present day, encompassing everything from small private gardens, to the secret gardens of Arab princes, to the vast public park at Versailles.


With hundreds of photographs and illustrations, the book's broad sweep make it the perfect reference for garden-lovers everywhere, offering in 1,750 alphabetical entries wide-ranging coverage that sheds light on virtually every aspect of the topic. The writing is authoritative and engaging and there are sumptuous color photographs by some of the world's best garden photographers as well as elegant engravings of historical subjects. Well over half of the entries are devoted to individual gardens, many of them open to the public.

These include every kind of garden from palace gardens to botanic gardens and arboreta, late 20th-century land art, and contemporary gardens everywhere. The volume also provides biographies of garden designers, nurserymen, and others, entries on the worlds of horticulture and plant science, and articles that range from garden elements and styles to scientific issues and social history.

Central to the book are the garden cultures of Italy, Britain, France, China, Japan, and the USA, but the coverage is worldwide, including such far-flung regions as Turkey, Peru, and Bali. The contributors include leading authorities and top garden writers from more than 25 countries. Many of their entries include suggestions for further reading and the work's usefulness is further enhanced by a general bibliography, a thematiclisting of contents, and an index of gardens, individuals, themes, and features. 


"Put plainly, this doorstop of a reference book is worth its weight in gold."
--The Los Angeles Times
"The perfect guide for anyone who wants to learn in an entertaining way about magnificent classical to contemporary gardens of the world.... Can be displayed on your coffee table."
--The Washington Post
"Liberally sprinkled with handsome full color photographs that catch the spirit of the individual landscapes."
--National Gardener
"A word of warning--there's no quick escape from this marvelous book."
--Hugh Johnson

Library Journal

First published in 1986 as The Oxford Companion to Gardens, this revision includes 1750 A-to-Z entries covering all aspects of gardening. The focus here is still on garden design but with a greater emphasis on the gardens themselves. Indeed, over 1000 gardens world wide are featured-a number greatly expanded from the previous edition-including both public and private gardens in locales as varied as the United States, Japan, Turkey, and Peru. Garden experts from all parts of the globe contribute entries that generally run three or four paragraphs. Broader topics, like entries on specific countries, may run up to six pages.

Also included here are biographies of garden designers and related practitioners in the field, garden-related concepts and styles, and general overviews of horticultural practices. A thematic listing of entries at the front of the book gives the user a quick overview of what can be found in specific categories. The 45 historical engravings and 96 color photographs (not seen) are sure to enliven the text. Bottom Line Highly recommended for public and academic libraries that support garden and landscape programs.-Phillip Oliver, Univ. of North Alabama, Florence Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

More Reviews and Recommendations

Biography


Patrick Taylor is a well-known garden writer and lecturer. He has been writing about gardens and gardening for nearly twenty years and is the author of many books and has written for The Daily Telegraph, The Sunday Telegraph, Country Life, Gardens Illustrated, and The Garden.

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

[ Edited ]

Table of Contents

Patrick Taylor was born in 1941 in Bangor County Down, Northern Ireland. After medical and specialist training in Ulster he emigrated to Canada in 1970 to pursue a career in academic medicine. He has held appointments at a number of universities and retired in 2001 to write and sail full-time. He is the author of more than one hundred research papers, editor of a medical journal and continues to contribute to many journals throughout North America. This is his third book of fiction, and the Irish-American Post will be printing excerpts of it. Taylor lives on Bowen Island, B.C., with his wife Kate.
  Introduction and Acknowledgements vii
  Editorial Teamxi
  Thematic Index xix
  List of Colour Plates xxvii
  Note to the Reader xxix
  The Oxford Companion to the Garden 1
  Select Bibliography 531
  Select Index 539
  Picture Acknowledgements


Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

There is some controversy about this updated edition of the Oxford Companion to the Garden. Here is a review I found online: http://horthistoria.com/?p=80

 

 

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Patrick Taylor, editor
Oxford -- New York   Oxford University Press 2006

Writing about gardens and garden history is a funny business. I know because I do it from time to time. The difficulty is that the genre doesn’t know what it wants to be when it grows up. For the time being the art historians are rampant, treating the garden as a tangible piece of art, to be coddled and fussed over literarily with all the apparatus of the discipline. This is very fine but it is not the only way to deal with the question. The paradox of the permanent “hardscape” versus the ephemeral nature of the plantings escapes no one who is serious about the matter.

This dichotomy forms the basis of the “great garden divide”. For those lucky enough to attend the recent Horticulture program of that name at the San Francisco Botanical Garden, the matter was debated vigorously by several renowned experts.

Before we reach go any further, there is a very fundamental issue to be discussed. One volume, even as large as both the first and second editions of the companion, can in no way do justice to the size of the topic. Providing even a superficial view of the best gardens in the British Isles alone would need many volumes. Writing about France, Italy, Spain, Turkey and all the other countries with a long and distinguished history of garden-making would lead to the same problem.

Note the use of the title “companion”. The publisher knows perfectly well that its single volumes cannot possibly stand in for a true world-level encyclopaedia and yet an encyclopaedia is what comes to mind when faced with almost 600 pages of closely spaced text.

Almost exactly 20 years ago, the Oxford University Press (affectionately known as OUP) issued The Oxford Companion to Gardens, edited by Sir Geoffrey and Lady Susan Jellicoe. They are known for masterly works on garden design and history. The Landscape of Man recounts human endeavour in creating gardens since pre-history.

In their introduction to the 1986 edition, the Jellicoes laid down their markers. The book would cover the ” art of garden design on a world-wide scale from the earliest records of civilization to the present day”. Garden design was an “art form.” The most far-reaching decision was to exclude gardens which might be very handsome but which did not indicate movement in a trend or have sufficient quality to stand on their design alone.

These criteria led to certain compromises, bundling some topics into general articles and giving special attention to individual places only if that were warranted. The list of contributors was stellar, with almost every well-known garden writer of the time included.

Patrick Taylor has edited the second edition of the companion, now entitled The Oxford Companion to the Garden. How was he to proceed after the auspicious beginning made by the Jellicoes? He has written more than 15 books about gardens, some of which have been singled out for considerable praise. Taylor knows his stuff. He added five associate editors of impeccable reputation and assembled a who’s who of every type of garden writer from numerous countries.

They divided the topics into biography, gardens both public and private and several smaller categories of more technical import such as garden styles and garden issues (aesthetic, theoretical, social and archaeological).

It is always marvellously interesting to read a biography. I pick familiar names at random: Luis Barragan, the ascetic Mexican stylist, Lancelot ( “Capability”) Brown, genius of great parks, Jens Jensen, apostle of the prairie, as well as Continental, South American and Antipodean men and women who have contributed to the great movement of garden design in civilization. These and many others appear here in splendid sketches.

There are some omissions and one could quibble about whether this one or that one should have been included. Here is an example. John Hooper Harvey was a maverick student of garden history with very pronounced tastes and little talent for compromise, something of a gadfly. He operated outside the official circles, having been essentially self-taught and without formal credentials. In spite of that Harvey wrote more serious books and published more scholarly articles than many tenured professors. Harvey was instrumental in founding the Garden History Society.

Only one French nursery is noted, Vilmorin’s in Paris. Given the statement about the world-wide scope of the work it is a pity that the editor did not include anything about two great Continental nurseries, Louis van Houtte of Ghent and the Lemoine dynasty in Nancy, France.

Van Houtte was a pioneer of plant hybridizing at a time when it was theologically suspect in the first decades of the nineteenth century and was the first European to get an Amazon water lily to bloom outside the tropics. He taught Victor Lemoine who gave us practically every modern version of ornamental plant, most particularly, lilac. Lemoine produced so many hybrids year after year that the secretary of the local horticultural society in Nancy complained. When he grew old his son and later his grandson took up the task.

When it comes to specific gardens there are few objective standards. Inevitably including one rather than another comes down to taste. Lionel de Rothschild’s collection of prize rhododendrons at Exbury is not listed. Alnwick in Northumberland, a pioneer in modern garden design and planting, is also absent. Happily one of my favourites does appear, the Gulbenkian Garden in Lisbon. Mexico, gigantic source of plants and garden philosophy in North America, is represented by a measly three places. That is an insult.

Both the Jellicoes and Patrick Taylor must have known they were condemned to leap from peak to peak in this volume and leave 90 % of the material down in the hidden valleys. They chose to do it in slightly different ways. The second edition is suitably glossy for current taste, compared to the slightly austere and more usual type of university publication of the first. As the reader can tell I like what I see but lament the editorial and business decisions which led to so many omissions.

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

Another site describes this book:

 

Edited by Patrick Taylor

Over 1,800 entries

‘... a word of warning – there's no quick escape from this marvellous book’ — Hugh Johnson 

This Companion is devoted to gardens of every kind and the people and ideas involved in their making. It combines a survey of the world's gardens with articles on a range of topics, such as garden visiting, horticulture, scientific issues, and the social history of gardens, as well as biographies of garden designers, nurserymen, and others. Over half the entries are devoted to individual gardens, ranging from palace gardens such as Versailles to private gardens of outstanding design or plant interest, botanic gardens and arboreta, and late 20th-century land art. The geographical coverage is worldwide, with contributions from leading authorities and top garden writers from more than 25 countries. 

Edited by Patrick Taylor, independent garden writer and lecturer

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

Here is an excerpt I found here:  http://www.mywire.com/a/Oxford-Companion-Garden/Hampton-Court-Palace/9583872/

 

Oxford Companion to The Garden

Hampton Court Palace

 

 

Richmond upon Thames, Surrey, England, was started by Thomas Wolsey in 1514 and built on a grandiose scale in the Gothic style with about 810 hectares/2,000 acres of land surrounding it. In1525 Wolsey gave the estate to Henry VIII who enlarged the palace and greatly added to thegardens. The Privy Orchard was ornamented with several sundials made by the royal horologist Nicholas Kratzer and by the most distinctive ornaments of early Tudor gardens—carvings of heraldic beasts mounted on poles. In the 1530s three new gardens were made running down to the river Thames south of the palace—the Mount Garden, Pond Garden, and Privy Garden. These are seen in a remarkable, very detailed drawing by Anthonis van Wyngaerde of c.1555 and show rectilinear layouts, many upright ornaments (presumably the beasts), a banqueting house, and a terrace walk running down to the banks of the river. 

The Mount Garden was planted with apple trees and themount itself was surmounted by a glazed arbour crowned with a leaden cupola. The Privy Garden, which lay below the windows of the King's apartments, was described by a German visitor, Thomas Platter, in 1599. He described knots whose patterns were marked by red brick dust or sand and topiary in ‘all manner of shapes, men and women, half men and half horse, sirens, serving-maids with baskets, French lilies and delicate crenellations all round made from dry twigs bound together’. Roy Strong believes it likely that these features dated from Henry VIII's time. In Henry's time it is plain that the garden was regarded as a magnificent royal status symbol, even grander than any garden made by Henry's great French rival François I.

 

In the 17th century there were many changes in the garden. Charles II, having acquired a taste for French gardens in exile, had made a great patte d'oie east of the palace, possibly designed byAndréMollet and in place by 1662The central avenue of the patte d'oie encloses a canal, the Long Water. After 1688, in the reign of William III, even greater changes were made. In 1689JohnEvelyn described a ‘spacious garden with fountaines was beginning in the parke at the head ofthe canal’. This was the Great Fountain Garden, a semicircular garden below the east façade of Wren's new building with parterres de broderie and fountains, probably laid out by DanielMarot, seen in Leonard Knyff's painting of 1702 which still hangs at the palace. At about the same timeGeorgeLondon and HenryWise designed a formal wilderness to the north of the palace and a great avenue linking it to Bushy Park which then formed part of the Hampton Court estate.

Only a small part of the wilderness survives, a fragment of a yew maze, the earliest known hedge maze tosurvive in England. Another development associated with Wren's extension to the palace was thePrivy Garden running from the south façade to the banks of the river. The Privy Garden was probably designed by Daniel Marot and is seen in an engraving by Sutton Nicholls of c.1696. It was originally in the form of gazon coupé, sweeping shapes cut out of turf. An early 18th-century plan shows much more elaborate parterres here, the work of Henry Wise who had already completed one of the parterres by 1701. At about this time magnificent screens of wrought iron by Jean Tijou, originally made for the Great Fountain Garden and costing £2,160 (about £172,000 in today's money), were erected at the river end of the Privy Garden.

 

In the 18th century there were no great additions to the gardenCapabilityBrown was appointed royal gardener in 1764 and came to live at Wilderness House in the grounds of Hampton Court Palace. He did not introduce any informal landscaping scheme here but could not bring himself tohave the topiary clipped. When ThomasJefferson visited Hampton Court in 1786 his journal noted laconically, ‘Old fashioned. Clipt yews grown wild.’ Brown is credited with planting in 1768 thesurviving and still productive black Hamburgh dessert grape (now correctly Vitis vinifera ‘Schiava Grossa’) in the glasshouse south of the palace. George II (d. 1760) was the last monarch to live at Hampton Court Palace. In 1838 Queen Victoria opened the grounds as a public park which they have remained ever since.

Later, in the 20th century, Ernest Law studied the history of the gardens and inspired the replanting of the gardens south of the old palace, dating from Henry VIII's time, with cheerful but unhistorical bedding schemes. In the 20th century the Privy Garden, most of whose statuary had been removed by George IV, became a lugubrious and labyrinthine shrubbery in whichthe original yew topiary grew unchecked. Bedding schemes of municipal splendour were laid out inthe Great Fountain Garden where the old yews, under the influence of Ernest Law, were clipped into their present dumpy conical shapes. In recent times incomparably the most important development has been the thoroughly researched restoration of the Privy Garden inspired by thepioneer restoration of Het Loo.

In 1993 the site was cleared and excavations laid bare the original pattern of the garden. Ring counting of the old yews showed them to be the original trees. Yews and holly were propagated, so that the ancient clones could be preserved. No list survived of theoriginal ornamental planting but contemporary lists (including two lists of 1701 showing plants ordered for the garden) gave a clear idea of the historical repertory. These plants were disposed in accord with what is known about planting systems of the first years of the 18th century.

Much research was done into precisely the right clone for dwarf box (Buxus sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’) of which 30,000 plants were propagated to edge the parterres. Statues were copied from surviving originals and Tijou's wrought-iron screens were superbly restored. Queen Mary's Bower, a tunnel of wych elm (Ulmus glabra) running along the western side of the Privy Garden of which original plants survived to the 1970s when they were killed by elm disease, has been reinstated using hornbeam (Carpinus betulus). The result is a restoration faithful to both the history and character of the place. It is to be hoped that other parts of this great garden will be brought back to life with similarly inspired restoration.

 

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

Garden Reading

Plants & Gardens News Volume 21, Number 2 | Summer 2006

by Patricia Jonas

http://www.bbg.org/gar2/topics/reviews/2006su_book.html

 

 

A classic reinvented, The Oxford Companion to the Garden, is edited by Patrick Taylor. It supersedes one of my favorite reference books, The Oxford Companion to Gardens, edited by Geoffrey and Susan Jellicoe, Patrick Goode, and Michael Lancaster. As Taylor writes in the introduction to the newCompanion, its predecessor "was a book that all with a serious interest in gardens and their history needed to have on their shelves." When an advance copy of Taylor's new volume came to me, I immediately started looking for what had changed—other than the subtle difference in the title. The expanded coverage is obvious: 1,750 total entries versus 1,500, and 1,000 individual gardens profiled versus 700. Color has been added, but while 100 color photographs trapped in 25 signatures may be prettier, they are not as edifying as the earlier volume's 250 black-and-white photographs scattered throughout and sensibly attached to the text.

I turned to one of the subjects that I thought was inadequately covered in the original Companion: Japanese gardens. Happily, Marc Peter Keane, author ofJapanese Garden Design (and a contributor to BBG's Japanese-Inspired Gardens) has been enlisted to correct this. He does so with thoroughness and balance and nearly triples the number of entries that were in the original. There are many other wonderful additions to the list of contributors, such as David Streatfield, who has added depth to the coverage of California gardens, and Charles Beveridge, whose entry on Olmsted replaces Patrick Goode's rather perfunctory one in the earlier volume. There is a fourfold increase in the number of United States gardens described, and indeed, geographical coverage is considerably expanded to include many more non-European garden cultures.

More "garden styles and types" are also covered, including baroque and vernacular gardens—but there's still nothing on modernist gardens (and entries for modernist figures Richard Neutra and James Rose have been eliminated). There are comparatively long new entries under the thematic title "aesthetic and theoretical issues." Roy Strong's contribution ("artist and the garden") is certainly one of the best of them, but several of these articles lack perspective and critical rigor, like "photography and gardens," by Andrew Lawson, who is an important contemporary garden photographer but not, in my opinion, the best choice to write this essay.

At first, I was puzzled by why Taylor decided that this Companion should be "for the most part newly commissioned" and swapped out so many of the earlier volume's contributions by respected academic scholars like John H. Harvey, John Dixon Hunt, Ann Leighton, Monique Mosser, and Kenneth Woodbridge. But it seems his editorial decision was to compile a book that would appeal as much to those who visit gardens as those who study them. That's certainly how the book reads and why it should be welcome in many more garden lovers' libraries than the original. It's also the reason why the new Companion does not replace the first, which remains an essential tool (and is still generally available in the used-book market). Gluttony, perhaps, but I am glad I have both books.

Finally, like chefs who rely on trucs de cuisine, gardeners have trucs du jardinier. Garden experts have offered their tricks and tips to successful cultivation at least since the days of ancient Rome, and gardeners are still trying to sort through their clutter of bewildering, often conflicting advice. Like a horticultural Mr. Wizard, Jeff Gillman enjoys nothing so much as testing that advice, and in The Truth About Garden Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't & Why (Timber Press, 2006), he offers his trenchant explanations of the science behind more than 100 common practices. Among his general subjects are fertilizers, water, biostimulants, and pesticides. Each entry covers "the practice," "the theory," "the real story," and "what it means to you."

I thought I had heard everything from callers to BBG's Gardener's Helpline over the years, but Gillman has encountered many more bizarre recommendations (homemade fertilizers based on household ammonia, eggshells to repel slugs, hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide) and skewers them with great humor. Occasionally, to his surprise, he finds remedies that work better than he anticipated (for instance, a 1-part water, 3-parts mouthwash concoction was "head and shoulders better than other homemade fungicides at controlling both powdery mildew and black spot"). He makes testing seem like fun and encourages gardeners to put aside their own test plot for homemade concoctions. And he has a take-home message for every gardener: "Do not settle for unexplained recommendations."

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

Here is an excerpt from the Oxford Companion:

 

 

 

The orange, a native of China, has been a fruit much coveted for English gardens since the 16th century, and the early efforts to conserve it through harsh winters led to the long English tradition of growing plants under glass. British gardeners began to order citrus trees from France and create winter shelters for them in 1562.

During the reign of Charles I (1625-49), the nobility continued to build orangeries, adding bigger and more handsome edifices to their gardens. Some had long south-facing windows, set into classically-styled masonry but with solid, opaque roofing. Celebrated architects of the time devised orangeries in classical, Gothic, rustic, and baronial styles to match the exteriors of the mansions whose gardens they graced.

The idea was to overwinter the trees in the orangeries and then place them outdoors as a novel and luxurious decoration for the garden during the summer (this led to trees being planted in decorated wooden tubs to facilitate moving them outdoors). [Image from: Garden Mania, by deBay and Bolton]

 

Read the full related article here: 

http://www.shedstyle.com/the-orangery-traditional-garden-architecture/

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: December Feature: THE OXFORD COMPANION TO THE GARDEN by Patrick Taylor

Another review of our featured book:

 

“Even the smallest garden should have room for an acre of rhododendrons” is the apocryphal quote attributed to that doyen of English horticulturists, Sir Harold Hillier. The Oxford Companion to the Garden is redolent with these warm overtones that would give smug satisfaction to a post-modern critic (Patrick Taylor even refers to his wife lurking in the background and describes the Eden Project’s botanical interpretations as hectoring and gung-ho). However, Taylor’s achievement in producing a new Oxford Companion is a fine one.

 

The book is immensely useful as a reference for garden history, style and biography, and as an introduction to the world’s famous parks and gardens for actual and vicarious travel. Indeed, this new edition addresses some of the interesting inconsistencies between authors in the 1986 Oxford Companion to Gardens. For example, John Harvey’s and Nigel Hepper’s divergent views of botanic gardens in to Gardens are reconciled with a scholarly entry by Patrick himself in to the Garden!"