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becke_davis
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Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

From the author of the highly acclaimed TULIP, our feature for January is Anna Pavord's new book, BULB:

 

 

 

Bulb 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis

A personal selection and authoritative guide to the most beautiful bulbs on the earth. 

The publication of Anna Pavord's guide to her favorite bulbs, corms, and tubers is an event to be celebrated. Here, the world famous author of The Tulip, selects 540 favorite bulbs, more bulbs than and gardener could grow in a lifetime.

Easy-to-grow, generally inexpensive and highly accessible, bulbs are readily available from many outlets. From acis, anemones and arums to zantedeschia, zephyranthes, and zigadenus, this alphabetical collection provides inspiration, insight, anecdote, and helpful advice. Special photography reveals the glory of each bulb, explaining flowering size, height, planting depth and requires soil and climatic conditions.

This gorgeous book, a complete deluxe package, will appeal to gardeners as the world's most authoritative and affordable reference work on bulbs.

The New York Times - Dominique Browning

This is the most beautiful garden book of the season. Quite apart from its liveliness and wit, Bulb is handsomely produced, full of ravishing photographs by Andrew Lawson and Torie Chugg, and, appropriately enough, positively biblical in its binding. (There's even a ribbon to mark your place—when was the last time you saw that in a garden book?)…A few moments with Pavord is worth a few hours with a psychiatrist.

More Reviews and Recommendations

Biography

Anna Pavord writes for several magazines in the UK and she has authored eight books, including the internationally acclaimed bestseller, The Tulip

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becke_davis
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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

NPR says: Weighing in at a fat four pounds, Bulb is the ultimate eye candy, just as the author intended. "Wherever the pages fell open," writes Anna Pavord, "I wanted the bulbs to sing out: 'You've got to have me. You can't live without me.'"

 

Click here to see excerpts (pages) of the book: http://www.npr.org/assets/artslife/books/2009/12/bulb/

(If you click on the images, you can see additional pages)

 

Here are links to some blogs, interviews and reviews about this book:

 

http://www.gardenrant.com/my_weblog/2009/11/anna-pavord-loves-bulbs-more-than-i-do.html

 

http://whatweretheskieslike.blogspot.com/2009/11/anna-pavordbulb.html

 

http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2009/10/review_bulb.html

 

Here is an excerpt of BULB from the Royal Horticultural Society website: 

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/News/New-book-on-bulbs

 

"Tulips are Old World rather than New World flowers. Their heartland is in central Asia, close to the great mountain ranges of the Tien Shan and the Pamir Alai. In this remote, wild area, far from the cities of men, you will find more wild tulips than anywhere else on earth. Though the flower has now been introduced very successfully into parts of the world where Nature never intended it to grow, central Asia is still the cradle of this enormous genus. It is the queen of all bulbs, producing the sexiest, the most capricious, the most various, subtle, powerful and intriguing flowers that any gardener will ever set eyes on.

Tulip bulbs are solid things, covered with a brown or black skin, called the tunic. We are used to seeing quite big, chunky tulip bulbs for sale in late summer. The bulbs of wild tulips are much smaller, and the colours of the tunics are more various, some almost red, others gorgeous rich chestnut. Some wild tulips produce bulbs with a hairy coat just under the tunic, with tufts of hair sticking out at the top.

Tulips can reproduce themselves in two ways. The mother bulbs produce offsets – baby bulbs that grow alongside the parent bulb and take a few years to grow on to flowering size. The flower also sets seed in a distinctive, three-sided seedpod, but, if you want to grow a tulip from seed, you will have to wait five to seven years for a flowering-size bulb. Offsets always show the same characteristics as the parent. Tulips raised from seed may not. So, by crossing certain wild tulips and sowing their seed, breeders could produce new tulips quite easily. But you need to be patient.

Some tulips have only two leaves, but usually there are more, and they vary widely in width, length and colour: some are bright, shining green, some almost grey, some striped and speckled in patterns like snakeskin, or trimmed with neat edges of cream or silvery white. Some tulips, especially the small, wild ones have leaves with waved and crinkled edges which lie on the ground like drunken starfish.

But the point of a tulip, of course, is its flower, more gorgeous, more capable of variation, than any other flower on earth. They display themselves on sturdy, upright stems, most often just one flower on each, though some wild tulips such as T. turkestanica and T. biflora carry several flowers at once. So do garden tulips such as ‘Georgette’. The shape of the flower and its petals varies widely. Some make rounded bowl shapes, others splay open into stars. Some have long, narrow petals, others have broad, generous ones. Lily-flowered tulips such as ‘Sapporo’ flip out from the waist and, in terms of form, are wildly elegant."

 

I love Anna Pavord's book THE NAMING OF NAMES, too -- here's an article about that one:

 

http://www.remarc.com/craig/?p=55

 

 

Naming of Names

 

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

 

Anna Pavord - click to view high-res (300dpi) image

 

© George Wright

 

 

Anna Pavord is the gardening correspondent for the Independent and the author of eight previous books, including the bestselling The Tulip. She contributes to a number of magazines, both in the US and the UK and regularly fronts programmes for BBC Radio 3 and 4. She chairs the Gardens Panel of the National Trust and sits on the Parks and Gardens Panel of English Heritage.

She lives in Dorset, England, where she spent thirty years restoring the garden of an old rectory. She has recently moved to a new house and started another garden. She is married and has three daughters

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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

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Choisya
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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

I like Anna Pavord's books and I share her fascination with bulbs, especially tulips.  However, Becke, you are not going to tempt me to buy any more gardening books at the moment:smileyhappy:.  

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becke_davis
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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

I know what you mean, Choisya. I have absolutely zero will power when it comes to resisting books. Which is why my bookshelves are always overflowing.

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Re: Feature for January: BULB by Anna Pavord

 

I was browsing through my copy of Anna Pavord's The Tulip, and I want to recommend this book, also. There are some books featuring the tulip, in both fact and fiction:

 

 

 

 

Hana In The Time of The Tulips

 

The Black Tulip (Penguin Classics Series)

 

The Golden Tulip

 

Tulips

 

Tulips

 

Tulipmania

 

Tulip Fever

 

Tulip

 

Tulipomania

 

 

 

 

The Infinite Tulip