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February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

 

 

The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis

The invaluable resource for home food gardeners!

Ed Smith's W-O-R-D system has helped countless gardeners grow an abundance of vegetables and herbs. And those tomatoes and zucchini and basil and cucumbers have nourished countless families, neighbors, and friends with delicious, fresh produce. The Vegetable Gardener's Bible is essential reading for locavores in every corner of North America!

EVERYTHING YOU LOVED about the first edition of The Vegetable Gardener's Bibleis still here: friendly, accessible language; full-color photography; comprehensive vegetable specific information in the A-to-Z section; ahead-of-its-time commitment to organic methods; and much more.

Now, Ed Smith is back with a 10th Anniversary Edition for the next generation of vegetable gardeners. New to this edition is coverage of 15 additional vegetables, including an expanded section on salad greens and more European and Asian vegetables. Readers will also find growing information on more fruits and herbs, new cultivar photographs in many vegetable entries, and a much-requested section on extending the season into the winter months. No matter how cold the climate, growers can bring herbs indoors and keep hardy greens alive in cold frames or hoop houses.

The impulse to grow vegetables is even stronger in 2009 than it was in 2000, when Storey published The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible. The financial and environmental costs of fossil fuels raise urgent questions: How far should we be shipping food? What are the health costs of petroleum-based pesticides and herbicides? Do we have to rely on megafarms that use gasoline-powered machinery to grow and harvest crops?With every difficult question, more people think, "Maybe I should grow a few vegetables of my own." This book will continue to answer all their vegetable gardening questions.

Praise for the First Edition:
"In every small town, there is a vegetable garden that people go out of the way to walk past. Smith is the guy who grew that garden." — Verlyn Klinkenborg, The New York Times Book Review

"An abundance of photographs . . . visually bolster the techniques described, while frequent subheads, sidebars, and information-packed photo captions make the layout user-friendly . . . [Smith's] book is thorough and infused with practical wisdom and a dry Vermont humor that should endear him to readers." —Publisher’s Weekly

"Smith . . . clearly explains everything novice and experienced gardeners need to know to grow vegetables and herbs. . . . " — Library Journal

"this book will answer all your questions as well as put you on the path to an abundant harvest. As a bonus, anecdotes and stories make this informative book fun to read." - New York Newsday

 

Biography

Edward C. Smith is the author of Incredible Vegetables from Self-Watering Containers. He tends a garden of over 1,500 square feet filled with raspberries, blueberries, flowers, herbs, and nearly 100 varieties of vegetables, including some heirlooms, in his home state of Vermont.

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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

Many people are tightening their budgets these days, and one good way to cut your food bills is to grow your own vegetables. Besides the financial benefits, homegrown veggies just plain taste better than the produce in grocery stores.

 

Whether you're an old hand at growing vegetables or someone just starting out, the latest edition of THE VEGETABLE GARDENER'S BIBLE is an excellent reference book and a must for your garden library.

 

Check out these great reviews:

 

http://www.compostguy.com/books/the-vegetable-gardeners-bible/

 

http://organicgardens.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_vegetable_gardeners_bible

 

http://inmykitchengarden.blogspot.com/2006/03/book-review.html

 

http://davesgarden.com/products/gbw/c/108/

 

http://www.bobshowto.com/book-review-the-vegetable-gardeners-bible.htm

 

http://muskogeephoenixonline.com/blogs/MollyDay/2009/01/vegetable-gardeners-bible-2000-book-is.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

Edward C. Smith

Edward C. Smith

 

 

Edward C. Smith tends a garden of over 1,500 square feet filled with raspberries, blueberries, flowers, herbs, and nearly 100 varieties of vegetables, including some heirlooms in his home state of Vermont. 

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becke_davis
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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

From the DAILY HERALD:

 

 

 

"If you give 'The Vegetable Gardener's Bible' to someone, maybe they will share the bounty."

 

 

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

Like our other featured book, THE VEGETABLE GARDENER'S BIBLE is profusely illustrated and divided into three clearly defined sections:

 

1) From Seed to Harvest: Higher Yields with Less Work

 

2) The Healthy Garden: Aboveground, Belowground

 

3) Plant Directory: Index of Vegetables and Herbs

 

The whole book is built around author Edward C. Smith's high yield WORD system, designed for all North American Gardening regions:

 

W - Wide rows

 

O - Organic methods

 

R - Raised beds

 

D - Deep soil

 

This book offers good, practical advice and deserves a place in every garden library. 

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becke_davis
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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

The house I live in now isn't ideal for vegetable gardening because all the sun hits the front of the house. The back is wooded, plus it also has the shade from the house itself. Zoning regulations mean my front yard is boring lawn with bits of garden, although I do have a heavy fruiting peach tree basking in the sun.

 

In back, I have a wooded area that I like to keep a little wild. I love the mats of violets that bloom there in the spring (and don't require mowing), and I can try out new shrubs and trees without worrying about the design. It's a cross between an arboretum and a field test, and woodland natives work well there.

 

I also grow a lot of plants in containers on my multi-level deck, which gets part sun. When my kids were younger I grew strawberries and veggies on one side of the house. Now I try out all different daylilies there, in addition to the conifers, the Zephirine Drouhin rose and the Henryii clematis that are established there. Nowadays, I grow more herbs than veggies and I tend to grow them in containers on the deck. I like herbs where I can handle them -- I want them in easy reach.

 

What about you? What herbs, fruits and vegetables do you grow?

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Melhay
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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

This looks like another handy little book to have around.

 

I tried my first vegetable garden last year.  It started out doing well, then it slowed down rather quickly in growth and then didn't produce much at all.

 

I wanted to get some furtilizer on it at the end of the season last year, well... wanted.  But I think I need to make it bigger to start too.  I have a lot to do and learn to get good results.  I should probably pick up a book, like this one, and study up for next year.

 

I was looking for a book last year right before I started my garden and right when I started.  There are so many books out, that I just didn't know what to get.  So, I got nothing.  This sounds like it will help a lot from down in the ground up.

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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

A lot can depend on the type of fertilizer you're using, the amount of water and sunlight, and even the quality of the seeds. If you're growing tomatoes, there are so many to choose from and they have different growth habits and germination times. It does help to have a reference book to advise you.

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Melhay
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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

I really want to get a guide to help with this years vegetables.

 

My tomatoes last year got hit with that disease that was going around.  I got to the plants and did what I could to save the ones I could.  I sprayed, clipped, and removed the infected ones before they infected the others.  Out of 16 plants I think I was able to save 4.  I thought that was pretty good, for me, with as bad as the disease was flying around.  And my neighbor still never removed his tomatoe stocks from last year that died most ugly deaths from it.  I am hoping we will be okay this year coming.

 

I think having a guide before hand will help me from beginning to end.

 

Thanks!

_______________________
"There are no honorable causes. There is no good or evil. Evil is only what we call those who oppose us." From Nyphron Rising, By Michael J. Sullivan

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Re: February Feature: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible

Mel, I'm not pushing this book just to sell it for B&N. I have a lot of reference books, and this is one of the best.