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becke_davis
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

Crape myrtle has been blooming almost everywhere I've visited this year, even here in Cincinnati -- although here it doesn't always make it through the winter.

As far as talking to plants, singing to plants, playing music to plants -- if it works, go for it!
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kiakar
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Re: Introduce Yourselves



becke_davis wrote:
Crape myrtle has been blooming almost everywhere I've visited this year, even here in Cincinnati -- although here it doesn't always make it through the winter.

As far as talking to plants, singing to plants, playing music to plants -- if it works, go for it!




It really works for my violet! My Crepe Myrtle is doing great! The blooms are so pink and beautiful. (between a pink and a purple)
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Nelljean
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Re: Any garden writers out there?

It's time for the Rutabaga to 'turn up' -- pardon the pun. Someone from 'Garden Design Friends' on MSN asked about you, Becke, reminding me that I had not checked in here in a long time.

I saw there's a thread asking What's Blooming? -- I'll link to my Picasa Album of yesterday that shows what's blooming here to attract butterflies.

Butterflies July 23

The following are my blogs; one just wasn't enough:

Secrets of a Seed Scatterer

Antique Plants

There's another but it isn't plant related.
It's been a fun summer. The Grandson spent a week with us before he left for indoctrination at the United States Merchant Marine Academy. We built stone steps while he was here to do lifting for the ol' grandmother.

Oh, and I'm reading a new book from Timber Press, new to me at least: Tropical Flowering Plants by Kirsten Albrecht Llamas. I found lots of my flowers, including Pride of Barbados and Tecoma stans, both of which I started from seeds in the spring.

Nell
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becke_davis
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Re: Any garden writers out there?

Welcome back, Nell! It's so nice to hear from you! I've been traveling a lot this year, and I've seen a lot of tropical plants on my travels. I've picked up a couple of books on that topic but I don't have the one you mentioned. Anything published by Timber Press is going to be top of the line, so I'll have to look for that one.

I'll check out those links -- hope you are having a great summer. Keep us posted on your grandson and his travels, too.
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becke_davis
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Re: Any garden writers out there?



Nelljean wrote:
It's time for the Rutabaga to 'turn up' -- pardon the pun. Someone from 'Garden Design Friends' on MSN asked about you, Becke, reminding me that I had not checked in here in a long time.

I saw there's a thread asking What's Blooming? -- I'll link to my Picasa Album of yesterday that shows what's blooming here to attract butterflies.

Butterflies July 23

The following are my blogs; one just wasn't enough:

Secrets of a Seed Scatterer

Antique Plants

There's another but it isn't plant related.
It's been a fun summer. The Grandson spent a week with us before he left for indoctrination at the United States Merchant Marine Academy. We built stone steps while he was here to do lifting for the ol' grandmother.

Oh, and I'm reading a new book from Timber Press, new to me at least: Tropical Flowering Plants by Kirsten Albrecht Llamas. I found lots of my flowers, including Pride of Barbados and Tecoma stans, both of which I started from seeds in the spring.

Nell




Nell, your blogs are great and as always, you have great pictures. The white datura is what I call jimsonweed, it's one of those weeds that is prettier than a lot of cultivated flowers. I love the look of the whole plant, but it is very poisonous. The seeds are also hallucinogenic, teenagers have been hospitalized after trying to make the most of that -- they are very dangerous. Unlike other daturas, jimsonweed (also called thornapple) is very hardy and the seeds will survive even the coldest winters.
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caroline88
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Re: Cabbage and cutting


KathyS wrote:
Caroline,

Well, we do have a dilemma with the cooking, don't we? Hmm....So, I assume you must eat out a lot....No kitchen...no refrigerator, either? Maybe, if you're going to grow vegetables, we should stick with the ones that need no refrigeration, and no cooking? I guess most vegetables can be eaten raw, although, I've never eaten a raw Brussel Sprout...I'm not even fond of them cooked!

I don't use a shredder when I make coleslaw. I know you can use a mandolin(not the musical kind;-), but I've always just used a knife, sliced it thin, and then chopped it up. If the knives are sharp enough, it doesn't take much strength in you hands.

When I'm on my computer, I use an ergoBeads wrist support in back of my mouse. It's made by IMAK. I pick it up once in a while, when I'm reading or not using my mouse, and squeeze it with my hands. Kind of like those balls you sqeeze to releave stress and strengthen your hands. I've worked in produce for so many years, knives are just what I use every day.

You don't have a place to cut anything? A bed? A table? I'd give you my recipe for coleslaw, but it uses mayonaise...that needs refrigeration. But you can always toss the cabbage with a light vinegar and olive oil with salt and pepper. Providing you like raw cabbage.

Where I live, in the southern region of California, I'm relatively close to the Mexican border, and eating Mexican food was common when I was growing up. The Mexican culture uses a lot of cabbage, in place of lettuce. Raw onion, the Spanish (brown) onion, is thinly sliced and soaked in lemon juice(or vinegar)/water. The onion becomes mild and can be used in salads. You can even toss this in with cabbage, if it sounds good to you. How did we get off onto the cabbage subject? LOL

Now, I think any gift, whether by a horse, cow, chicken, fish, or a bat, sounds good enough, as long as you aren't worried about the weed problem. But if it's "fresh" it will be "strong"....I'd probably dig a hole or area, and allow it to sit and "mellow out". I'm thinking it contains a lot of acid, or residual alkaline source, and you don't want to burn your plants with this fresh stuff! Becke could advise you on this. And I don't have a clue as to how often you should spread your wealth! LOL....I'm lucky if my garden gets it once a year, but Spring always sounds good to me. And it's a good source of mulching material while turning the soil over. Some plants have different, and specific fertilizing needs and regimes, other than the generic horse stuff....So, Good luck! (You might want to have a fly swatter handy)LOL


LOL, Kathy, my apologies for being away for so long.

Yes I do have a refrigerator and a family size freezer for a one person household. I just do not have a worktop, a sink or kitchen cabinets so I can do all things. As long as I am a Master Juggler. I could do the cutting on top of the washing machine, in the bathroom upstairs. At least it won't wobble.
I'd love to have your recipe but you may leave out the onions. I cannot cut those because it is hard to see what you are doing with tears streaming down your face and I am kinda partial to keeping my hands intact. The only ones that I can buy pre-cut are the sharp white onions.

As far as fertilizer goes, I let my garden fend for itself, which it does admirably. The only thing, I make my own compost which I put on some of the roots before the frosts starts or around plants that I think need a bit extra. When I weed the garden or clip things, I sort it in two piles. The wooden things that would take too long, the seeded stuff or dangerous roots, go into the container. Which will be composted by the city composter. The fresh, green stuff. Or the leaves from the birch tree. They all go into my own small compost heap and it is 100% pure organic matter. A small pile but the rotting is just one of those things that you don't need to do much about. Just like the growing of plants. All you need to do is add a little something every now and then and let time do the rest.
Belief in your mission, greet life with a cheer
There's big work to do, and that's why you are here
~ Caroline
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RED_40
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

Hi! I started gardening about 5 seasons ago. I mostly grow vegetables and herbs, but I've added some flowers. I've fallen in love with lisianthus (Texas rose); it's so lovely and it's easy to grow. I have full sun

I garden in containers on my porch. Added to that is a 15 X 20 foott plot I rent in a community grden. I love it.
http://jen-gardenblog.blogspot.com/
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becke_davis
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Re: Introduce Yourselves



RED_40 wrote:
Hi! I started gardening about 5 seasons ago. I mostly grow vegetables and herbs, but I've added some flowers. I've fallen in love with lisianthus (Texas rose); it's so lovely and it's easy to grow. I have full sun

I garden in containers on my porch. Added to that is a 15 X 20 foott plot I rent in a community grden. I love it.




Lisianthus is beautiful, I've seen it in real pretty arrangements in window boxes and containers, too.
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RED_40
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

yes, it's beautiful! I grew both the "regular" and a dwarf lisianthus this year; the latter would be great for containers. It was not as good for cutting as the full-size ones. When I cut the flowers, the stems are very short (on dwarf) or have many undeveloped buds that I really don't want to loose. So, in the ground I'll stick to full size from now on.

It's hard to pick a favorite color of lisianthus, but the yellow with pink edges are frontrunners. If there are salmon petals with pink or red edges, I want it! :smileyhappy:
http://jen-gardenblog.blogspot.com/
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RosemaryH
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Re: Introduce Yourselves



BookClubEditor wrote:
Reply to this thread to introduce yourself to the group! Let us know what you love (or hate) about gardening, and share some of your favorite gardening ideas, as well.


Hi,
I'm a master gardener in CT (although that makes me sound smarter than I am.) I have a little over three acres but I leave a lot of it wild and probably only garden in half of it. I have a lot of shade, rocks and acid so I grow the usual suspects azaleas, rhodys, pieris, andromeda, enkianthus, etc. Also have lots of dogwoods and bamboo. I've been gardening here for 14 years and think my garden is finally getting close to the way I want it. Hope to plant more peonies this fall before it gets too late. Anyone else love fall planting?
rosemary


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becke_davis
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Re: Introduce Yourselves



RosemaryH wrote:


BookClubEditor wrote:
Reply to this thread to introduce yourself to the group! Let us know what you love (or hate) about gardening, and share some of your favorite gardening ideas, as well.


Hi,
I'm a master gardener in CT (although that makes me sound smarter than I am.) I have a little over three acres but I leave a lot of it wild and probably only garden in half of it. I have a lot of shade, rocks and acid so I grow the usual suspects azaleas, rhodys, pieris, andromeda, enkianthus, etc. Also have lots of dogwoods and bamboo. I've been gardening here for 14 years and think my garden is finally getting close to the way I want it. Hope to plant more peonies this fall before it gets too late. Anyone else love fall planting?




Ah, Rosemary, you grow all those neat plants that need acidic soil. Nearly every place I've lived has had mostly alkaline soil so I'm jealous!
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RosemaryH
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

Seems we always want what we don't have. When I go to California I lust for the
bouganvillea and agapanthus that they can grow seeming in a patch of dust.
rosemary


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becke_davis
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

Try growing them in containers -- that's the only way we can have them in the midwest.
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RosemaryH
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

..and treat them as annuals or will they come back? I (happily) grow a lot of perennials in containers because I hate having to make 35 containers every year, but never thought of trying b'villea. Have you ever grown wisteria in a container? I started one this year but chickened out and put it in the ground - didn't want to lose it.
rosemary


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becke_davis
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

You could plant them in containers and try overwintering them in a garage or shed. It's a little tricky but it can be done. As to the wisteria, I wouldn't try planting that in a container. It takes a couple of years to flower -- puts in some growth first. It's pretty hardy but just needs to mature before it flowers. After three to five years it goes nuts -- grows really fast, and flowers more and more every year. Once it is really established, the vines get heavy and woody, too strong for any but the strongest support. It needs a lot of room, too. Wisteria does attract bees so don't plant it near the house if anyone in your family is allergic or afraid of bees.
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RosemaryH
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

Thanks, I'll try it next season.
rosemary


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Pipper
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Re: Introduce Yourselves



BookClubEditor wrote:
Reply to this thread to introduce yourself to the group! Let us know what you love (or hate) about gardening, and share some of your favorite gardening ideas, as well.


Hi, I'm Pipper and am excited about discovering this great online book club about gardening. I live in Seattle and garden rain or shine all year long. I used to get the blues when winter rolled around and it was time to put the garden to bed (no pun intended!) for the winter. Now I spend the winter going through all my gardening magazines again, cutting out pages of interest, and then using them to change my gardens or to add more gardens. I just don't think there was ever a flower I met that I didn't like. I want them all!

My passion is flower and herb gardening versus vegetables. I look forward to learning from everyone and enriching my garden knowledge.

Happy Holidays,
Pipper
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RosemaryH
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Re: Introduce Yourselves



Pipper wrote:


BookClubEditor wrote:
Reply to this thread to introduce yourself to the group! Let us know what you love (or hate) about gardening, and share some of your favorite gardening ideas, as well.


Hi, I'm Pipper and am excited about discovering this great online book club about gardening. I live in Seattle and garden rain or shine all year long. I used to get the blues when winter rolled around and it was time to put the garden to bed (no pun intended!) for the winter. Now I spend the winter going through all my gardening magazines again, cutting out pages of interest, and then using them to change my gardens or to add more gardens. I just don't think there was ever a flower I met that I didn't like. I want them all!

My passion is flower and herb gardening versus vegetables. I look forward to learning from everyone and enriching my garden knowledge.

Happy Holidays,
Pipper




Hi Pipper,
Welcome! I'm relatively new here too - I think I joined just as people were putting their gardens to bed so not much activity. Every gardener seems to have his own way of dealing with the cabin fever that sets in, and lasts until we can get back out there! My garden is in Connecticut, zone 6, and right now it's under a foot of snow.
Have you ever been to Bloedel (sp?) Reserve on Bainbridge island? I remember visiting there some years ago and thought it was wonderful.

Cheers!
rosemary


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becke_davis
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

It's a quiet time on this board but I'm always around, watching for activity. . .kind of a stalker, yikes! Anyway, welcome and don't hesitate to ask about any gardening questions you may have. Tonight I will be posting discussion topics on P. Allen Smith's great book, so keep an eye out for that. See you later!
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KathyS
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Re: Introduce Yourselves

Welcome to the Garden Club, Rosemary and Pipper! Nice to see your shining faces, ladies, amongst the winter's gloomy beds. But watch out for Becke, she'll sneak up on you, and throw sunshine all over the place! She's the good fairy of the book world, too........waving her magic wand, and BAM!....The flowers start to sprout, along with the mysteries of her Mystery Club! She's all over these boards, as I am.

I'm Kathy S., the resident B&N gnome, mostly hanging out in Lit&Life, and assorted book discussion. I live in Southern California, the Inland Empire to be exact, where it hardly ever rains....except now! Finally, finally, finally, some rain!!...and snow, too!

Right now, because of the rain, things in my garden are starting to sprout! Seeds I had planted this last Spring, are finally coming up! This week, I've put my nose to the ground, and within once burnt, bare spots, from the horrible hot summer we had, I'm now seeing tiny flowers ready to grow! It just took that rain, which we hadn't seen since last year....and now things are coming alive, again.

My tomato plants are full of tomatoes. Now, if we don't have a freeze, we'll be okay. Snapdragons are still blooming, statis, carnations, sweet alyssum, daisies, wild Ca. poppies....I'm finally seeing life, after death, in my garden!

I remember the snow we had in Utah, when I lived there. Everything that bloomed sort of stopped, and plants went dormant....except the pansies that were winter hardy, and I loved seeing them peak out from the snow, whenever it melted away. We all see a different world, wherever we live.

I hope you enjoy asking questions, Becke is most helpful....and read around all of the threads, we've talked about everything *under the sun*....and I hope you feel free to add to it!

Happy Holidays, and happy reading!
Kathy S. :smileyhappy:

RosemaryH wrote:


Pipper wrote:


BookClubEditor wrote:
Reply to this thread to introduce yourself to the group! Let us know what you love (or hate) about gardening, and share some of your favorite gardening ideas, as well.


Hi, I'm Pipper and am excited about discovering this great online book club about gardening. I live in Seattle and garden rain or shine all year long. I used to get the blues when winter rolled around and it was time to put the garden to bed (no pun intended!) for the winter. Now I spend the winter going through all my gardening magazines again, cutting out pages of interest, and then using them to change my gardens or to add more gardens. I just don't think there was ever a flower I met that I didn't like. I want them all!

My passion is flower and herb gardening versus vegetables. I look forward to learning from everyone and enriching my garden knowledge.

Happy Holidays,
Pipper




Hi Pipper,
Welcome! I'm relatively new here too - I think I joined just as people were putting their gardens to bed so not much activity. Every gardener seems to have his own way of dealing with the cabin fever that sets in, and lasts until we can get back out there! My garden is in Connecticut, zone 6, and right now it's under a foot of snow.
Have you ever been to Bloedel (sp?) Reserve on Bainbridge island? I remember visiting there some years ago and thought it was wonderful.

Cheers!