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Choisya
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

I love those conifers! Should I buy them small and grow them in pots until they're large? I could move them around in the backyard for a while that way to find the perfect spot for them... How quickly do they grow, and do they stop at a certain height?

 

 

They are slow growing but expensive to buy large.  The ones I have just bought were 1 metre tall and cost $75 each.  You could buy smaller ones at around $15 and plant them in large pots, which would make them look taller!  Use square pots if you can and push them together to form a hedge.  I have put together some photos here of the yellow plants in my garden and on the one called Garden View you will see 2 small Thujas in brown pots on the right hand side.  My card reader has broken so I can't take photos of my bigger new ones yet.

 

I have also put together some photos of what is in flower in my garden this month which you might also like to view.  

 

The password is Choisya, view full screen as a slideshow with 'info' on.  

 

 

 


chokeword wrote:

Choisya wrote:  

The dwarf green stripe Bamboowith evergreen foliage makes an excellent, quick-growing screen. (You do not need to cut it back in the winter.)  Thuja occidentalis Aurea Nana is a golden, hardy, slow growing conifer with a nice aroma, which makes a good subject for boundaries. If planted fairly close together they can be clipped to form a dense aromatic hedge.  (I have just planted 3 of these in large pots outside my front door.)

 


This is so exciting! 

 


 

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chokeword
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


Choisya wrote: 

 

They are slow growing but expensive to buy large.  The ones I have just bought were 1 metre tall and cost $75 each.  You could buy smaller ones at around $15 and plant them in large pots, which would make them look taller!  Use square pots if you can and push them together to form a hedge.  I have put together some photos here of the yellow plants in my garden and on the one called Garden View you will see 2 small Thujas in brown pots on the right hand side.  My card reader has broken so I can't take photos of my bigger new ones yet. 


 
I like the idea of the square pots. Maybe I can buy large hats to put on them to make them look even taller... Maybe not. 
Your garden is gorgeous! I love the mix of container plants and regular (grounded?) plants. It seems like it would be fairly easy to rearrange if the mood strikes. 
And what on earth is that awesome twisty tree you have? I want one. I'm so jealous.  

 

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Choisya
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

Yes, I rearrange th pots a lot and in the winter I make little theatrical scenarios on my patio for winter interest, using ornaments and pots.

 

The tree is a corkscrew hazel Corylus avellana contorta - it bears catkins in the spring and nuts in the autumn!  

 


chokeword wrote:

Choisya wrote: 

 

They are slow growing but expensive to buy large.  The ones I have just bought were 1 metre tall and cost $75 each.  You could buy smaller ones at around $15 and plant them in large pots, which would make them look taller!  Use square pots if you can and push them together to form a hedge.  I have put together some photos here of the yellow plants in my garden and on the one called Garden View you will see 2 small Thujas in brown pots on the right hand side.  My card reader has broken so I can't take photos of my bigger new ones yet. 


I like the idea of the square pots. Maybe I can buy large hats to put on them to make them look even taller... Maybe not. 
Your garden is gorgeous! I love the mix of container plants and regular (grounded?) plants. It seems like it would be fairly easy to rearrange if the mood strikes. 
And what on earth is that awesome twisty tree you have? I want one. I'm so jealous.  

 


 

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becke_davis
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

Sometimes garden centers label the corkscrew hazel with its common name: Harry Lauder's Walking Stick.
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Choisya
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

LOL.  Even in America?  That's very old fashioned nowadays - my grandfather used to do impressions of HL:smileyhappy:.

 


becke_davis wrote:
Sometimes garden centers label the corkscrew hazel with its common name: Harry Lauder's Walking Stick.

 

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Choisya
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

Another worthwhile tree with yellow foliage is the deciduous Catalpa bignoniodes Aurea which can be pruned to a lovely umbrella shape.  Every two years it bears the most spectacular flowers, rather like lupins.  It is slow growing and very suitable for a small garden.  (Shelter from wind.) The large leaves fall in early autumn but are easy to gather up.  Mine was 'bonsaid' by planting it in a very large pot and is now ten years old.  I keep it well watered in the summer and feed it in the Spring and Autumn. 
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becke_davis
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


Choisya wrote:

LOL.  Even in America?  That's very old fashioned nowadays - my grandfather used to do impressions of HL:smileyhappy:.

 


becke_davis wrote:
Sometimes garden centers label the corkscrew hazel with its common name: Harry Lauder's Walking Stick.

 


I only know who he was because I lived in England.  His name is better known in the US for the plant than for the person.

 

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becke_davis
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


Choisya wrote:
Another worthwhile tree with yellow foliage is the deciduous Catalpa bignoniodes Aurea which can be pruned to a lovely umbrella shape.  Every two years it bears the most spectacular flowers, rather like lupins.  It is slow growing and very suitable for a small garden.  (Shelter from wind.) The large leaves fall in early autumn but are easy to gather up.  Mine was 'bonsaid' by planting it in a very large pot and is now ten years old.  I keep it well watered in the summer and feed it in the Spring and Autumn. 
We get a lot of catalpas in my area, but I don't think I've ever seen this form -- thanks for telling us about it!

 

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Par4course
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

To KathyS  THANK YOU!  I was just checking out the thread about "New Garden Blog", hoping for help with my garden, and saw that you had tried to send me a post but got timed out.  Even though it disappeared, I appreciate your effort. I thought I'd been forgotten, or had entered my problem on the wrong thread.  I will now wait patiently.  Thanks again.
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becke_davis
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

The new blog was supposed to be up Thursday, but evidently there are some technical difficulties.  I thought it was going to be under the Unabashedly Bookish link, but apparently this will be under a whole new section.  I won't be the only one blogging, and the others will be writing on a lot of home and garden-type topics.  I'll tell you more about it when I know more!
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KathyS
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


becke_davis wrote:
The new blog was supposed to be up Thursday, but evidently there are some technical difficulties.  I thought it was going to be under the Unabashedly Bookish link, but apparently this will be under a whole new section.  I won't be the only one blogging, and the others will be writing on a lot of home and garden-type topics.  I'll tell you more about it when I know more!

 

Thanks for the update, Becke!
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KathyS
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


Par4course wrote:
To KathyS  THANK YOU!  I was just checking out the thread about "New Garden Blog", hoping for help with my garden, and saw that you had tried to send me a post but got timed out.  Even though it disappeared, I appreciate your effort. I thought I'd been forgotten, or had entered my problem on the wrong thread.  I will now wait patiently.  Thanks again.

 

Good morning!  No, I haven't forgotten you!  After that run of time-outs I'd had, I tried to think of saying something to you that wouldn't become a "novel" size post! LOL  I'll go back to where you had posted your concerns, and talk to you there!  Hang in there. :smileyhappy:

 

Kathy

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KathyS
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


Par4course wrote:

Is this a good thread to ask for help?  I, too, have moved from small space to a house in the last 2 years.  I've spent my time re-doing the front yard, changing it from grass and overgrown bushes to xeroscape with kangaroo paws, mexican sage, society garlic, creeping rosemary and lots of succulents.  (By the way, I live in Southern California).

In the backyard,I've found my happy space for vegetables.... BUT I have this area ....

 

It's along a fence that runs mostly east to west.  Half of it is shared with a neighbor who grows oleander bushes near it (so I keep running into their roots) and half of it has a neighbor with a dog (and so, my dogs feel the need to be over there a lot, too.)

 

The biggest problem, though, is that in the winter and early spring it is in shadow almost continuously.  Now, and through the summer, it will get full sun almost all the day.  Everything I've tried to plant for winter shade, dies in the summer; everything I've tried to plant for summer sun dies in the winter.  Any ideas?


I'm back!  I'm not sure what I'd do about the 'oleander/dog' situation.  Fencing is about the only thing you can do for that.  Dig deep enough, pour cement borders, to block those darn roots.  I don't like oleander for several reasons, although not a bad tall hedge, away from the house.  They are poisonous, for one thing, you don't want your dogs, or people, to ingest them...!  And a big problem for allergy prone people.

 

I live in Homeland, Ca., near the Hemet area.  Very extreme high and low weather conditions at times.  Sunset Garden Magazine puts me in the zone of 18.  I think these zones are all different from the national weather zones' classifications.

 

I don't know what you planted in your winter shaded area, I'd like to know, but there should be a number of plants that will tollerate both combinations of shade and sun. I see Bird of Paradise on the south/east sides of peoples' homes, and Hibiscus.  (Calif. is such an odd shaped state, it's hard to tell what direction you're facing!) lol

 

Here are two of my favorite books:  The Sunset Western Garden Book is the Californian's bible.  I also love landscaping, and this other book on landscaping is a good one, too.

I hope this helps.  Keep us updated!

Kathy

 

Sunset Western Garden Book  

Western Landscaping  

 

 

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Par4course
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

Thanks - you've really given me a couple of good ideas. 

The digging and putting in concrete might not only help with the oleander roots, but I think it will help with the neighbor dog trying to dig under the fence.  Will have to do that in phases, though, I think.  (both neighbors are down-hill from me, so I worry about hillside sliding in spring rains.)

 

I'm in LaMesa, just east of San Diego...weird location as we're not considered coast, but not inland valley either.  

 

I do like bird of paradise, although the one I planted there has yet to bloom.  So far, the only things I've planted that have bloomed there are geraniums and day lilies. 
There's a calla lily that was there when I moved in, but any new ones rot in the winter.

I' m thinking of throwing in some sunflower seeds for this summer - but that might be too much shade for the day lilies?

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KathyS
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Re: New Garden - HELP!


Par4course wrote:

Thanks - you've really given me a couple of good ideas. 

The digging and putting in concrete might not only help with the oleander roots, but I think it will help with the neighbor dog trying to dig under the fence.  Will have to do that in phases, though, I think.  (both neighbors are down-hill from me, so I worry about hillside sliding in spring rains.)

 

I'm in LaMesa, just east of San Diego...weird location as we're not considered coast, but not inland valley either.  

 

I do like bird of paradise, although the one I planted there has yet to bloom.  So far, the only things I've planted that have bloomed there are geraniums and day lilies. 
There's a calla lily that was there when I moved in, but any new ones rot in the winter.

I' m thinking of throwing in some sunflower seeds for this summer - but that might be too much shade for the day lilies?


 

Okay, I know where you are.  You're in zone 23:  Known as the "Thermal Belt".   "One of the most favored areas in North America for growing subtropical plants.  Best zones for avocados!   85 percent ocean weather dominates.  Interior air is 15 percent, just the opposite of where I live.  (15 percent, for you, is when Santa Anna winds blow).  You can grow gardenias, too!  Proteas are grown commercially in this zone.

 

Does this shaded area get a lot of water?  Have you ever grown sunflowers? Save the seeds, and roast them!  I can't picture what growing them would do, as far as shade, to the daylilies. Here is some info on the Bird of Paradise

 

My computer is going through it's scan right now, and it's driving me nuts...slow!  Talk soon!

Kathy

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Par4course
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

Thanks again.  My daughter has been bugging me to try gardenias - her grandma has a lovely one in her back yard.  Guess I'll try one...

 

No, that area does not get water - I've put a soaker hose there this summer, but we don't have inground irrigation.  The dirt is very odd texture - I put some compost on it, but it obviously needs more.  Whenever I dig there, the dirt is rock hard.  I add stuff, dig, plant, water, and next time it's rock hard again.  I'm hoping the compost and extra water will eventually help.

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Choisya
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

 

Par4course wrote: 

The biggest problem, though, is that in the winter and early spring it is in shadow almost continuously.  Now, and through the summer, it will get full sun almost all the day.  Everything I've tried to plant for winter shade, dies in the summer; everything I've tried to plant for summer sun dies in the winter.  Any ideas?

 

One of the very best shrubs to plant in a difficult situation is Aucuba japonica Crotonifolia. It will grow well in any situation except the seaside, and in any soil unless very wet. The colour is best if it gets some sun but it will grow in full shade.   It makes a good hedge or a good specimen shrub.  The new growth in Spring is a beautiful bright yellow.

 

Other 'go anywhere' plants are Vinca major and major variegata (periwinkle)  and geranium, (cranesbill, not the bedding geranium).  Both tolerate shade and part shade and poor soil but they are invasive and need to be kept in check.  All do well under trees and are less invasive because there is less nourishment. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Par4course wrote:

Is this a good thread to ask for help?  I, too, have moved from small space to a house in the last 2 years.  I've spent my time re-doing the front yard, changing it from grass and overgrown bushes to xeroscape with kangaroo paws, mexican sage, society garlic, creeping rosemary and lots of succulents.  (By the way, I live in Southern California).

In the backyard,I've found my happy space for vegetables.... BUT I have this area ....

 

It's along a fence that runs mostly east to west.  Half of it is shared with a neighbor who grows oleander bushes near it (so I keep running into their roots) and half of it has a neighbor with a dog (and so, my dogs feel the need to be over there a lot, too.)

 

The biggest problem, though, is that in the winter and early spring it is in shadow almost continuously.  Now, and through the summer, it will get full sun almost all the day.  Everything I've tried to plant for winter shade, dies in the summer; everything I've tried to plant for summer sun dies in the winter.  Any ideas?


I'm back!  I'm not sure what I'd do about the 'oleander/dog' situation.  Fencing is about the only thing you can do for that.  Dig deep enough, pour cement borders, to block those darn roots.  I don't like oleander for several reasons, although not a bad tall hedge, away from the house.  They are poisonous, for one thing, you don't want your dogs, or people, to ingest them...!  And a big problem for allergy prone people.

 

I live in Homeland, Ca., near the Hemet area.  Very extreme high and low weather conditions at times.  Sunset Garden Magazine puts me in the zone of 18.  I think these zones are all different from the national weather zones' classifications.

 

I don't know what you planted in your winter shaded area, I'd like to know, but there should be a number of plants that will tollerate both combinations of shade and sun. I see Bird of Paradise on the south/east sides of peoples' homes, and Hibiscus.  (Calif. is such an odd shaped state, it's hard to tell what direction you're facing!) lol

 

Here are two of my favorite books:  The Sunset Western Garden Book is the Californian's bible.  I also love landscaping, and this other book on landscaping is a good one, too.

I hope this helps.  Keep us updated!

Kathy

 

Sunset Western Garden Book  

Western Landscaping  

 

 


 

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Par4course
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

Thank you, I'll look for that shrub, and I already have some geraniums growing there, but will try some of the ones you mentioned.
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KathyS
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

[ Edited ]

Par4course wrote:

Thanks again.  My daughter has been bugging me to try gardenias - her grandma has a lovely one in her back yard.  Guess I'll try one...

 

No, that area does not get water - I've put a soaker hose there this summer, but we don't have inground irrigation.  The dirt is very odd texture - I put some compost on it, but it obviously needs more.  Whenever I dig there, the dirt is rock hard.  I add stuff, dig, plant, water, and next time it's rock hard again.  I'm hoping the compost and extra water will eventually help.


Gads!  I'm glad you mentioned Soaker Hose!   Thanks!  I just now ran outside to turn mine off!  I've had it on ALL day!  I have a mound out in my front yard, with plants, and it's always needing water, and stupid me forgets to turn the timer on, so I don't leave it running, to the point it runs down the street!  A big NO-NO!  I could get fined!

 

I know what you mean about rock hard soil...I add tons of amendments, but if it's not kept soaked, the top layer gets baked hard from the heat, the water never goes deep enough to keep the soil loose.  And our rain doesn't amount to more than a spit in the ocean! Cheap bags of horse manure, weed free, is not strong, and it's a pretty good amendment.  You can buy the expensive stuff, and it doesn't work any better.

 

I did buy the moisture control potting mix that has Perlite in it, plus a couple of extra bags of Perlite, to amend my large pots.  I bought a flat of Vinca's that I want to put in pots this year.   And, I'm still going to get that gardenia, too! We'll both get one!

 

I usually sow a lot of different flower seeds around, but not last year, it just got too hot.  My Statis is growing beautifully right now, along with carnations and snapdragons, and a few odds and ends that keep coming back. 

 

I'm still trying to figure out where I want my new hibiscus.  A few months ago, the Edison company put a pole at the end of my driveway.  I asked them if I could make a sculpture out/around it.....They said I could do whatever I wanted!  I'm thinking of turning  it into a palm tree!  Spray paint it green, and add a bunch of fake palm frons! Ha!  And maybe plant my hibiscus close by it.  I heard from the edison guy that my neighbor wasn't happy that they were putting in this pole, it blocked her view from her front living room windows (not that she had a real view, just the street and the house across from us).  It doesn't bother me, of course, since I don't live in the front part of my house.  But she loves plants, fruit trees and flowers, so I'm thinking of making it pretty for her to look at. LOL  I'm just wishing it'd cool down a little.  It doesn't interest me to go outside when it gets this hot. I'm already sick of summer!

Message Edited by KathyS on 05-17-2009 07:30 PM
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Choisya
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Re: New Garden - HELP!

How about carving a Native American totem pole, or painting the pole to resemble one?   

 


KathyS wrote:
Gads!  I'm glad you mentioned Soaker Hose!   Thanks!  I just now ran outside to turn mine off!  I've had it on ALL day!  I have a mound out in my front yard, with plants, and it's always needing water, and stupid me forgets to turn the timer on, so I don't leave it running, to the point it runs down the street!  A big NO-NO!  I could get fined!

 

I know what you mean about rock hard soil...I add tons of amendments, but if it's not kept soaked, the top layer gets baked hard from the heat, the water never goes deep enough to keep the soil loose.  And our rain doesn't amount to more than a spit in the ocean! Cheap bags of horse manure, weed free, is not strong, and it's a pretty good amendment.  You can buy the expensive stuff, and it doesn't work any better.

 

I did buy the moisture control potting mix that has Perlite in it, plus a couple of extra bags of Perlite, to amend my large pots.  I bought a flat of Vinca's that I want to put in pots this year.   And, I'm still going to get that gardenia, too! We'll both get one!

 

I usually sow a lot of different flower seeds around, but not last year, it just got too hot.  My Statis is growing beautifully right now, along with carnations and snapdragons, and a few odds and ends that keep coming back. 

 

I'm still trying to figure out where I want my new hibiscus.  A few months ago, the Edison company put a pole at the end of my driveway.  I asked them if I could make a sculpture out/around it.....They said I could do whatever I wanted!  I'm thinking of turning  it into a palm tree!  Spray paint it green, and add a bunch of fake palm frons! Ha!  And maybe plant my hibiscus close by it.  I heard from the edison guy that my neighbor wasn't happy that they were putting in this pole, it blocked her view from her front living room windows (not that she had a real view, just the street and the house across from us).  It doesn't bother me, of course, since I don't live in the front part of my house.  But she loves plants, fruit trees and flowers, so I'm thinking of making it pretty for her to look at. LOL  I'm just wishing it'd cool down a little.  It doesn't interest me to go outside when it gets this hot. I'm already sick of summer!

Message Edited by KathyS on 05-17-2009 07:30 PM