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BookClubEditor
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Ornamental Vegetables

[ Edited ]

The Reader's Digest book of Vegetable Gardening covers a lot more than the basics -- be sure to check out the back of the book where herbs are the featured plants. Pay special attention to the section on ornamental vegetables (pages 24-25). It used to be that you had vegetable gardeners and you had flower gardeners, and never the twain shall meet. People are recognizing now that some vegetables are not only edible but pretty enough to plant in a perennial bed or border. Swiss chard is a common example, but there are so many more.

Do you ever mix vegetables or herbs in with your flowering plants? Tell us about your favorite ornamental vegetables. Do you have any recommendations for perennial/vegetable combinations?


Reply to this message to discuss any of these topics. Or start your own new topic by clicking "New Message."

Message Edited by BookClubEditor on 03-02-2007 01:36 PM

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becke_davis
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Re: Ornamental Vegetables

In some parts of the country it's already warm enough to start planting vegetable. I'm in Cincinnati so it will be awhile yet before our ground dries up enough for planting. I am intrigued by all the beautiful vegetable cultivars that look pretty in a mixed perennial garden. Do any of you have favorites, either for growing to eat or growing for looks?
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Laura
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Re: Ornamental Vegetables



becke_davis wrote:
In some parts of the country it's already warm enough to start planting vegetable. I'm in Cincinnati so it will be awhile yet before our ground dries up enough for planting. I am intrigued by all the beautiful vegetable cultivars that look pretty in a mixed perennial garden. Do any of you have favorites, either for growing to eat or growing for looks?


So many herbs and vegetables look great mixed together with perennials in the cottage garden tradition. It so hard to list just a few...

Flowering oregano and sage are excellent examples - oregano can be used in containers, it drapes well over the side of a pot, or use as a low groundcover around other plants. Pineapple sage has a pretty green leaf, grows to small shrub size by fall, and blooms intense red flowers that hummingsbirds love. Other sages have a wide range of foliage shades to mix with flowering plants. Hot pepppers are cute, with little multi-colored fruit, and little grape and cherry tomatoes, too.
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KathyS
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Re: Ornamental Vegetables



Laura wrote:


becke_davis wrote:
In some parts of the country it's already warm enough to start planting vegetable. I'm in Cincinnati so it will be awhile yet before our ground dries up enough for planting. I am intrigued by all the beautiful vegetable cultivars that look pretty in a mixed perennial garden. Do any of you have favorites, either for growing to eat or growing for looks?


So many herbs and vegetables look great mixed together with perennials in the cottage garden tradition. It so hard to list just a few...

Flowering oregano and sage are excellent examples - oregano can be used in containers, it drapes well over the side of a pot, or use as a low groundcover around other plants. Pineapple sage has a pretty green leaf, grows to small shrub size by fall, and blooms intense red flowers that hummingsbirds love. Other sages have a wide range of foliage shades to mix with flowering plants. Hot pepppers are cute, with little multi-colored fruit, and little grape and cherry tomatoes, too.




Laura,
Thanks for the suggestions and descriptions! You've given me some ideas.:-) I'd all but forgotten about some of these plants and how pretty they can be. I've honestly never grown sage and oregano. Most herbs(other than in a bottle on my spice rack), I think of in the context of how will I use them in my cooking, once I've grown them, and not how pretty they can look in the garden. Time to go back to the nursery!

Kathy S.
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becke_davis
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Re: Ornamental Vegetables

Sage is one of my favorite plants -- annual and perennial forms. There are sages for every climate, if the rest of you haven't grown sage (Salvia) -- try it!