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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


Sunltcloud wrote:

To me the hardest thing is to stand by patiently when somebody takes ten steps that might be accompanied with grumpiness, with sighs, with accusing looks, with real pain. But those steps pay off in the long run. I worked in a nursing home once (part of a home health care certificate) and saw a lot of problems arise from the lack of time aides have, since they are taking care of a large number of patients. Minor accomplishments are often the only positive factors older people are able to contribute, but those accomplishments add much to their feelings of adequacy. On top of that the exercise helps with all sorts of physical problems.

 

I'm sure you are quite familiar with what I said above, and maybe you are not as impatient as I am. I have to remind myself to assist only when asked to. I see a "cooking nightmare" every time I spend a few days with Mother. She has macular degeneration and can't see the digital (red)display on her stove. She puts her hands very close to the top of the burners to feel the amount of heat. She sticks her hand into the toaster oven to feel the toast. She cuts up chicken for her cat with a sharp knife. I watch, but don't say anything. I've offered to help with her lunch and dinner, but she insists on doing it herself. She eats very little but has a well balanced diet, though sometimes she undercooks meat which can be dangerous. And some of the things she keeps in the refrigerator are outdated, especially a bunch of leftovers she stores in little margarine tubs in the freezer. It falls upon her daughter to make those leftovers disappear every once in a while. 

 

I tell myself that Mother was there for me - no questions asked - the day her son asked for a divorce - she made margeritas and let me and the kids spend the night That was more than 40 years ago. She loves to discuss politics with me. Sometimes she asks me to fix a hole in a sweater or to put a new lightbulb in a lamp or to take a look at the remote control (she has little feeling in her fingers and pushes buttons way too hard until they get stuck) She still sends me news clippings (she reads under a magnifying machine) and always remembers my birthday. She is my biggest fan when it comes to my writing. I have to take her "as is." And I have to be patient.

 

Well, that turned out to be my vent for the week. And the Northern California weather is perfect so far today. Not the high nineties of previous days.

Thanks! 



You know waiting doesn't bother me. Don't know if it was growing up with a mother who currently a home help nurse. She was a pediatrician nurse during my childhood. I grew up though looking after my elders. It's just what you did. My father reinforced patience as the most useful skill a warrior could have. Do I ever lose my cool yes, sooo not a saint. But it's usually(95% of the time) because of a religion argument she wants to have. Rule of thumb; remove yourself, cool down, and go back and apologize (and it doesn't matter who was right, apologize anyway).
Yes sometimes it is very hard NOT to help. That takes practice with each person. You got to learn when to step in. Worst one was when I forced her by grabbing the wheel to pull over and let me drive. Taking driving privileges away was down right nasty. (sigh) I think she hated me for 4 months solid, and treated me so. Actually the worst part of any of it is how much anger towards me helping, gets me. I understand it, I just don't like it.
Me I clean the refrigerator every mon after she goes to sleep, and just shrug I have no idea if she remembers to ask where something went.
It's not my mom, and truthfully my husband may love his mother, but he can't stand her. It's just all about doing the right thing. 

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


KathyS wrote:

Yes, for whatever reason, Edison picks this time of year to do this work!   Not everyone in this complex will have their electricity turned off, they're doing this work in sections.  I knew, after they put in the telephone pole [at the end of my driveway a few months ago], that lines would be added to it, but I didn't expect them to do it at the hottest time of year!   

 

I can't imagine not having air-conditioning....But it cools in the evening, here, and I don't need to keep it on at night.  I do have overhead fans, which helps a lot, too. It rarely gets muggy where I live, since I'm not close to the ocean.  I'm closing up the house early, today.

 

I'm sorry to hear about your plants dying....I do know the feeling....but I'm determined this year, with the few I've put in, to watch them like a hawk.  The kids put some of their radish, carrots and lettuce seeds in my large pots this week, and they're already up and looking good.  They're not in full, direct sunlight, though.....

 

So far my Gardenia is looking healthy, thank goodness!  It doesn't get the afternoon sun, and I give it plenty of water.   I love Azaleas, but I wouldn't even attempt planting them...just too hot here. My Vinca's do show stress when they aren't given enough water, but they bounce back....so lots of water is the issue for me.  Even my tomato plants have been looking a little wilty...I soaked them and totally sprayed them with water, from top to bottom, last night.  They look better this morning.   The tomatoes, themselves, do get sunburned, so I've been picking, eating, and giving them away before they get cremated....More to pick, today! 

 

Now, I must shut this computer down, and get ready for the kiddies, AND the day.....then, this afternoon, I'll be going around the house re-programming everything that got shut off!   My house phone is the biggest pain in the rear! 

 

Stay cool! :smileyhappy:

 

K.




Has anyone written you govenor about loss of power durring summer? That could kill someone.

 

Have fun with the kiddos.

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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


becke_davis wrote:
I sympathize with all of you suffering from the heat. When I arrived in DC, it was like walking into a steam bath. It was nice when I left, though.

Yeah Virgina weather is really weird right now, September in July.

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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

Well an update.

 

Yes it started raining AGAIN. 21/2 days of sunny normality, followed by light rain 2 days and now back to storms and lots of rain. El Nino really really sucks! I just want my back yard to dry out enough to poor concrete for a new shed. But when that will actually happen (sigh and shake head)?

 

Mom in law homecoming got delayed, she should (fingers crossed again) be here tomorrow. The equipment delivery got delayed. No walker or wheelchair, no homecoming. Delivery is at 10 am, so we'll see.

 

oh and I picked the first tomatoes off the upside down dohicky. A little smallish (my fist size) but tasty. If I was growing the same plant in the back yard it'd be 2 to 3 times that big. (sigh) Well something's better than nothing.

 

BTW anyone know what it means when something from the squash family blooms twice?

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

Sometimes plants bloom twice, but it's rarely a big bloom period. You might see scattered roses blooming on and off right up to winter, and it's the same with a lot of other plants. I'm not sure if it means anything specific when it's squash plants, but I imagine it's the same as with annuals and perennials.

 

Weird - my husband was just talking about those upside-down tomato dohickeys today. Wait for it, now someone else will mention them. Threes, right?

 

Oh baby, good thing I was gone for most of the mother/mother-in-law discussions. Best not to get me started! I love my mother, but thank the lord I don't have to live with her. 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


becke_davis wrote:

Sometimes plants bloom twice, but it's rarely a big bloom period. You might see scattered roses blooming on and off right up to winter, and it's the same with a lot of other plants. I'm not sure if it means anything specific when it's squash plants, but I imagine it's the same as with annuals and perennials.

 

Weird - my husband was just talking about those upside-down tomato dohickeys today. Wait for it, now someone else will mention them. Threes, right?

 

Oh baby, good thing I was gone for most of the mother/mother-in-law discussions. Best not to get me started! I love my mother, but thank the lord I don't have to live with her. 


Ok well the only different thing I see with these from the first bloom is these are more orange in color than first batch.

 

I did pick about 50% of the first batch for squash blossom soup, but I've done that before any never had a second bloom. I'm wondering if since these are from green mountain if it's super squash or something.

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

When you did it before they didn't rebloom? Often deadheading will spur a small second bloom, but it that was the case I would have thought you'd get rebloom every time you deadhead (to some extent). Has anyone else had this happen with squash?

 

Tigger - I'm intrigued. Would you share your squash blossom soup recipe with us? 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


becke_davis wrote:

When you did it before they didn't rebloom? Often deadheading will spur a small second bloom, but it that was the case I would have thought you'd get rebloom every time you deadhead (to some extent). Has anyone else had this happen with squash?

 

Tigger - I'm intrigued. Would you share your squash blossom soup recipe with us? 


A couple of days after bloom, just as they started to wilt a little. (shrug) Don't know, why I asked.

 

No problem 

 

Take 10 squash blossoms gently wash

1 to 2 carrots (size depending) and fine dice

1 onion fine dice

4 button mushrooms fine dice

3 celery stalks fine dice

1/4 pound of UNSALTED butter (smart balance works almost as well) and small chunk

1 qt water

1 qt of cream

3 tbs of light sour cream

fine ground white pepper

sea salt

1 pinch of nutmeg

 

in a 2 gal pot

clarify your miroqua (celery, onions, carrot, mushroom) in the butter - that's cooking them until the onion is see through and the carrots are soft

do not brown them, not a disater but the product will darken if

add a little salt

reduce you heat by adding the water when a low boil forms

add your blossoms and a little pepper

they'll cook real quick.. let the water reduce no more than 1/4

add the sour cream, wisk in

add your cream  bring to a low boil

add the nutmeg, wisk in

now taste and adjust salt and pepper to preference

 

enjoy

it's best fresh or on day one but it won't hold past day 3

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becke_davis
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

Oh my gosh, that sounds DELICIOUS! Thanks for sharing it with us!
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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

Yeah I feel in love with it long before I did a stint as a professional cook. So I HAD to learn the recipe.

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


TiggerBear wrote:

Yeah I feel in love with it long before I did a stint as a professional cook. So I HAD to learn the recipe.

 


I should have guessed you were a professional!

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


becke_davis wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

Yeah I feel in love with it long before I did a stint as a professional cook. So I HAD to learn the recipe.

 


I should have guessed you were a professional!

 


Well for 31/2 years, but a foodie all the way.

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KathyS
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Squash Blossoms for Soup

[ Edited ]

TiggerBear wrote:

Ok well the only different thing I see with these from the first bloom is these are more orange in color than first batch.

 

I did pick about 50% of the first batch for squash blossom soup, but I've done that before any never had a second bloom. I'm wondering if since these are from green mountain if it's super squash or something.


 

TiggerBear, your soup sounds yummy...I copied it.  I was wondering, what kind of squash are you talking about?  Are different ones/blossoms better than others for this soup?
Message Edited by KathyS on 07-21-2009 01:46 PM
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KathyS
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

[ Edited ]

TiggerBear wrote:

Has anyone written you govenor about loss of power durring summer? That could kill someone.

Have fun with the kiddos.


Well, it was mostly a pretty uneventful day, and we did have fun.  The electricity was turned off around 10:00, later than expected.  The kids and I packed a lunch, and left for the pool.  We stayed there until around 2:00, when they have to be out.  Someone I knew, who lives around the corner from me, came to the pool about 1:30.... b****ing about the inconvenience of it all....and was still b****ing at 2:30, when the kids and I left the pool area....I told her she only had an hour to go.  She was complaining about how and what to fix to eat!  And some how it sounded like she couldn't fix anything!  She wanted a hot dog!  LOL.....I told her if she had a gas stove, (which she did) to just light a match and ignite the flame!  (or eat it cold) She complained because she didn't have her computer....she complained for a myriad of reasons....I just shook my head, and thought of you, TiggerBear...shaking your head! Ha!  Good grief, you'd think this woman was going to starve to death because of having no electricity for a few hours!--- and she had more fat on her than I do!  Anyway, when I got home at 2:35, the electricity had already been turned back on.  So, it wasn't an all day thing.

 

Besides the notice I got on my front step, I got one in the mail, and on my telephone answering machine.  Far enough in advance for people to make arrangements to either leave, or find a way to deal with it.  Yes, there are medical reasons that have to be considered in this case, and the Edison Co. did do all they could to notify us.

 

But I really, seriously, doubt that our governor, Arnold, could really care what we do....fifty people....compared to a whole state that is sliding around in no budget, no money, no jobs to survive, situation.  But I'm sure there are a few people who have/will call Edison to complain...probably my neighbor in the pool! :smileyhappy:

 

Now, I just have to figure out, again, how to get my phone to stop flashing!  Was it function 4, or was it function  99, or a combination of one of those in-between?  :smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by KathyS on 07-21-2009 03:39 PM
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becke_davis
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

Wasn't there something in the news last summer about brownouts across California? It seems to be a recurring problem. Kathy, have you heard if there are plans to fix this?
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KathyS
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!


becke_davis wrote:
Wasn't there something in the news last summer about brownouts across California? It seems to be a recurring problem. Kathy, have you heard if there are plans to fix this?

 

I really no nothing about brownouts, other than when the load on the electric companies are too great, they start shutting areas down for short periods.  I'm on a plan, every summer, where I allow the electric company to shut off my air-conditioning during overload/peak periods.  They only shut my air-conditioner off for about 2 hours, once a month...Last year, I never noticed if they shut it off, or not.  It really makes a saving on my electric bill, to allow them this access.  It's all done electronically, no one comes to your house.  I would assume, with more people allowing this, there should be less brownouts.

 

I was watching a program the other night, which was on our water shortage, and with that shortage comes the problem of generating electricity from the dams, such as Hoover Dam....the water tables, all over the west, are growing dangerously low....pollutants start to play a big part in all of this, as well.   The wildlife, fish, plants, everything within our natural resources affects how we live.  The chain reaction is tremendous.  Without water, everything dies, including the large contributors to our electricity. 

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becke_davis
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Re: Vents and heat waves, and everything else!

That's really frightening, Kathy!
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TiggerBear
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Re: Squash Blossoms for Soup


KathyS wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

Ok well the only different thing I see with these from the first bloom is these are more orange in color than first batch.

 

I did pick about 50% of the first batch for squash blossom soup, but I've done that before any never had a second bloom. I'm wondering if since these are from green mountain if it's super squash or something.


 

TiggerBear, your soup sounds yummy...I copied it.  I was wondering, what kind of squash are you talking about?  Are different ones/blossoms better than others for this soup?
Message Edited by KathyS on 07-21-2009 01:46 PM

Nope the blossom mix does not matter; yellow squash, zucchini, pumpkin, ect.. It's the flower that gives the taste. Food secret, lots of flavor in many flowers. And the blossom I used came from green mountain I wouldn't know, until and if I get the vegis.

 

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Sunltcloud
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Tyrants and their gardens

 

For a long time I have marked passages about knitting in books I read; recently I added gardening passages to my group of favorites to be transferred to my reading journal. This morning, in preparation for my trip to Victoria B.C., I started Emily Carr's autobiography "Growing Pains" and immediately felt a kinship with her.

 

Emily Carr's father was a tyrant, adored by her mother, admired and feared by his children; a man with an "unbendable will," his "overbearing omnipotence" made bearable by his wife's "patient polishing of its dull metal so that it shone and reflected the beauty of orderliness that was in all Father's ways."

 

Like other tyrants he was fond of his garden (I think maybe a small place where even a tyrant can relax and allow himself to feel vulnerable? Or is castrating rosebushes just another way of showing domination?) Emily writes about her father coming home in the evening.

 

"If visiting children happened to be playing with us in our garden, or a neighbour calling on Mother, they scurried for the gate as fast as they could. Father would not have said anything if he had found them in his house - that was just it, he would not have said anything to them at all. He would have stalked in our front door, rushed through the house and out of the side door frowning terribly, hurrying to tend Isabella, the great, purple-fruited grapevine that crawled half over our house and entirely over Father's heart. Her grapes were most beautifully fogged with dusky bloom, behind which she pretended her fruit was luscious; but they were really tough-skinned, sour old grapes.

Father was burstingly proud of miserable old Isabella. He glassed her top so that her upstairs grapes ripened a whole month earlier than her downstairs ones. He tacked Isabella up, he pinched her back, petted, trained her, gave her everything a vine could possibly want, endured far more waywardness from her than all of us together would dare to show."

 

 

Growing Pains 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Growing Pains must be a favorite title to be used. I found nine books with it under "Add Product)

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becke_davis
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Re: Tyrants and their gardens

[ Edited ]

Oh, thanks so much for posting that! If any of the rest of you have favorite passages, please share them with us, too! It's available in two editions, not sure what the difference is.

 

Growing Pains  

 


Message Edited by becke_davis on 07-22-2009 07:09 PM