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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the veggies

(chuckle) I'm glad.

 

I'm afraid a section of my brain is a recipe perculator. Recipes go in, and come out at the oddest times. 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the veggies

Well a household update.

 

MomIL is doing fine. A little slow to respond, but they're still tweaking her medication.

 

Green Mountain has flattened out. The corn grew 1 large scraggly ear, I let the birds have their way with it. I've got 3 orange pumpkins growing fine. 12 cheery tomatoes, 3 Normal ones. All three plants have since kinda died down though. Green onion sprouts. Looks like come fall I'll have some mystery potatoes again. Green mountain decided that spreading across the whole garden patch was acceptable. Fine since because of the extremely heavy rains this year I opted out of a 3rd planting attempt. But I imagine all that churned soil was nice and easy to spread across.

 

A documentary suggestion, I heavily enjoyed watching last night "Lords of the Gourd", can we say extreme gardeners.

 

Pursuit of Excellence: Lords of the Gourd 
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becke_davis
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Re: Using up the veggies

Tigger - I'm glad things are looking up. Thanks so much for telling me about Lords of the Gourd -- definitely want to watch that now!
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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the veggies

Well I harvested 2 of the pumkins yesterday. I must say the most yellow insides I ever seen in a pumpkin.
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becke_davis
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Re: Using up the veggies


TiggerBear wrote:
Well I harvested 2 of the pumkins yesterday. I must say the most yellow insides I ever seen in a pumpkin.
Isn't it early for them?

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the veggies


becke_davis wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:
Well I harvested 2 of the pumkins yesterday. I must say the most yellow insides I ever seen in a pumpkin.
Isn't it early for them?

 


hmm well I used the normal methed for pumkins. If the pumkin either comes easily away from stem, sounds hollow when thumped, or has a soft bit comming; it's ready. Perhaps it was that they were ready a month or so early. Perhaps a hybrid mix. (shrug) They smelled like normal pumkin flesh. The seeds were normal. And so far no one who's eating the sugar free candied pumkin has had stomach problems. It's just very yellow, even cooked. I tasted a piece raw, normal if a bit different. Kinda of like buttersquash mixed with pumkin. But even buttersquash is orange normaly. So...

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becke_davis
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Re: Using up the veggies

Do you have any pumpkin recipes for us, Tigger? I just saw the movie Julie & Julia, which was WONDERFUL. I bought these books today:

 

My Life in France   Julie and Julia  

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the veggies

I've read the first of those, enjoyable book.

 

Pumkin recipes.. do you want sweet or savory?

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becke_davis
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Re: Using up the veggies

Well, I don't want to put you to work, Tigger, but you've given us some good recipes before -- I was sure you'd have something up your sleeve! What about the rest of you -- any requests?
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KathyS
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Re: Using up the veggies


TiggerBear wrote:

becke_davis wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:
Well I harvested 2 of the pumkins yesterday. I must say the most yellow insides I ever seen in a pumpkin.
Isn't it early for them?

 


hmm well I used the normal methed for pumkins. If the pumkin either comes easily away from stem, sounds hollow when thumped, or has a soft bit comming; it's ready. Perhaps it was that they were ready a month or so early. Perhaps a hybrid mix. (shrug) They smelled like normal pumkin flesh. The seeds were normal. And so far no one who's eating the sugar free candied pumkin has had stomach problems. It's just very yellow, even cooked. I tasted a piece raw, normal if a bit different. Kinda of like buttersquash mixed with pumkin. But even buttersquash is orange normaly. So...


TiggerBear,

How do you candy pumpkin?

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the pumpkin

 

Ok skip ahead anyone if you already know this stuff.

 

For starts,

With most pumpkin recipes you use already cooked pumpkin product, so as follows how to prep cook your pumpkin.

 

Wash pumpkin and cut in half. Scrape out the seeds and that stringy gut stuff. Save seeds for seed recipe, washing off all the goop; if desired. Stringy stuff and goop is all throw away. So for the pumpkin flesh. Set oven at 375. In a deep baking dish (the one you use for a whole chicken should do it, just remember both sides of the pumpkin are going to have to fit). Place your gutted pumpkin in, poor water half way up the outsides and 1'4 up on the insides of the pumpkin, DO NOT FORGET THE WATER. Side dish in oven and bake until pumpkin is soft, yields to knife, and is really pumpkin nice smelly. Do not worry if there is minor caramelization, but if there's alot you need to recalibrate your oven, it was too hot. Now remove the pumpkin from the dish poring off the water inside and set aside to cool. Ok so when pumpkin halves are mostly cool, still warm though, peel off the thin layer of outer hide, it'll practically slide off. So you've now got a nice peeled cooked pumpkin, take out your food processor and puree. From scratch now just like you get from the can. (chuckle) 


Roasted pumpkin seeds

 

cleaned dry seeds

oil of choice

salt (if desired)

Chili powder (if desired)

 

poor a thin layer of oil across a sheet pan, lay out seeds, slide into a 350 oven 

gently roast for 3-5 mins toss over and give aprox 2 more mins

remove from oven and lay out on paper towels salt immediately, and sprinkle any desired chili power while still piping hot

when they're cool enough to eat enjoy a nice high fiber snack (yes the shell is edible)

 


Candied Pumpkin

 

4 cups of cooked pumpkin

1 cup of brown sugar or splenda (if a less sweet product is desired reduce by 1/4 cp)

1tbs of dried lemon zest chopped fine

1tbs of allspice

1tsp of salt

1 1/2 tbs of powdered cinnamon

2 eggs

1 cup of skim milk

 

Mix pumpkin, sweetener, zest, salt, cinnamon, and allspice together. In a separate bowl break eggs in milk, don't whip just incorporate. In a pirex dish spoon in pumpkin mixture, poor over eggy milk, and gently stir in. Slide dish into a 350 degree oven, cook until you get minor browning on top aprox 45 min, it will still be a little soft but should not be still liquidy. Enjoy as is or brown some marshmallows on top.

 


 Pumpkin stir fry

 

1 onion sliced into half moons

6 sliced mushrooms

1/4  of a bok choy med chopped

4 green onions diced

1 cup worth of RAW peeled and thinly sliced pumpkin pieces

if desired some cooked chicken but totally optional

1tbs of minced ginger

1tbs of minced garlic

1tbs of hosion sauce (use a stir fry sauce if you want)

2tbs of terriaki sauce

bottle of sesame oil

cooked rice

 

In a nice hot pan; add a mild splash of oil, your ginger, garlic, onion, mushrooms, and pumpkin. After 3 mins add bok choy, terriaki, hoison, and any chicken. Saute up; adding oil as necessary to keep mix from sticking, less is better though. When your onion goes clear remove from heat and serve over rice.

 


Now a few places you can use pumpkin you probably didn't think of before.

 

 

Ever notice that bit on the back of cake mixes where it says apple sauce? Replace with pumpkin. Excellent in spice cake, oddly divine in chocolate. Moist and nutritious.

 

Try stuffing chicken cutlets with it, just add a little cinnamon and butter to the outside. 

 

Oh and if any of you are ambitious enough to make your own pasta, pumpkin ravioli is unbelievably good. Let me know.

 

I've got more, give a holler.

 


 

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Using up the pumpkin

Yeah, Tigger -- our own Julia Child!
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KathyS
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Re: Using up the pumpkin

TiggerBear, thank you so much for all of these recipes.  I never think to use a fresh pumpkin for cooking.  I went through a long process with someone, once, cooking fresh pumpkin, and I swore I'd never do it again....She boiled the chunks of pumpkin, and after removing the pulp from the skin, we sieved it...Ugh, It was an all day process!  We had several pumpkins!

 

I love butternut squash, and I invert the halves in a dish, with a very small amount of water, cover it with plastic wrap...pierced with a knife for vent holes, and microwave until tender.  Cool and scrape the squash from the skin..mash up with butter and salt an pepper only.  It is wonderful baked, inverted like that on a greased baking pan, without water, or covering....and the caramelizing is wonderful...Yummy. 

 

I love to stir fry all pumpkin/squash seeds in oilive oil....seasonings and seasoning salts of choice....garlic and curry and cumin...you name the flavor....they say not to wash the goopy stuff off the seeds, but to pull it off...saves the flavor.

 

Now I'm hungry!  I've got a butternut to cook!  (I've made pies with this squash...the best!)

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the pumpkin

[ Edited ]


KathyS wrote:

TiggerBear, thank you so much for all of these recipes.  I never think to use a fresh pumpkin for cooking.  I went through a long process with someone, once, cooking fresh pumpkin, and I swore I'd never do it again....She boiled the chunks of pumpkin, and after removing the pulp from the skin, we sieved it...Ugh, It was an all day process!  We had several pumpkins!

 

I love butternut squash, and I invert the halves in a dish, with a very small amount of water, cover it with plastic wrap...pierced with a knife for vent holes, and microwave until tender.  Cool and scrape the squash from the skin..mash up with butter and salt an pepper only.  It is wonderful baked, inverted like that on a greased baking pan, without water, or covering....and the caramelizing is wonderful...Yummy. 

 

I love to stir fry all pumpkin/squash seeds in oilive oil....seasonings and seasoning salts of choice....garlic and curry and cumin...you name the flavor....they say not to wash the goopy stuff off the seeds, but to pull it off...saves the flavor.

 

Now I'm hungry!  I've got a butternut to cook!  (I've made pies with this squash...the best!)


Uehk! No sieving nessisary. (shakes head) Try my method, under an hour start to finish. And if you've got the pans, an oven will fit 3 good sized ones. If there is an easy way to make something from scratch, believe me, I'll find it.

 

Me I tend to make soup with the butternuts. (shrug)

 

Sorry but that goopy stuff, I can't stand it. Funny what they say. Since the kindergarden always washed that stuff off. Any you buy, don't have it either. I say wash the nasty stuff off. 

 

Want an odd squash pie that no one will believe, ever made one with ugly squash? 

Message Edited by TiggerBear on 08-19-2009 04:58 PM
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KathyS
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Re: Using up the pumpkin


TiggerBear wrote:


KathyS wrote:

TiggerBear, thank you so much for all of these recipes.  I never think to use a fresh pumpkin for cooking.  I went through a long process with someone, once, cooking fresh pumpkin, and I swore I'd never do it again....She boiled the chunks of pumpkin, and after removing the pulp from the skin, we sieved it...Ugh, It was an all day process!  We had several pumpkins!

 

I love butternut squash, and I invert the halves in a dish, with a very small amount of water, cover it with plastic wrap...pierced with a knife for vent holes, and microwave until tender.  Cool and scrape the squash from the skin..mash up with butter and salt an pepper only.  It is wonderful baked, inverted like that on a greased baking pan, without water, or covering....and the caramelizing is wonderful...Yummy. 

 

I love to stir fry all pumpkin/squash seeds in oilive oil....seasonings and seasoning salts of choice....garlic and curry and cumin...you name the flavor....they say not to wash the goopy stuff off the seeds, but to pull it off...saves the flavor.

 

Now I'm hungry!  I've got a butternut to cook!  (I've made pies with this squash...the best!)


Uehk! No sieving nessisary. (shakes head) Try my method, under an hour start to finish. And if you've got the pans, an oven will fit 3 good sized ones. If there is an easy way to make something from scratch, believe me, I'll find it.

 

Me I tend to make soup with the butternuts. (shrug)

 

Sorry but that goopy stuff, I can't stand it. Funny what they say. Since the kindergarden always washed that stuff off. Any you buy, don't have it either. I say wash the nasty stuff off. 

 

Want an odd squash pie that no one will believe, ever made one with ugly squash? 

Message Edited by TiggerBear on 08-19-2009 04:58 PM

 

I see your way is better,,,much better!.....I assume the blender takes the stringiness out of the pumpkin.  The soup reminds me of a pumpkin soup I had that was to die for. I'd never tasted anything like it...it was one of the courses at a friends house, and I could have made a meal on that, alone!  I've never made it, but one of these days....when the weather gets cold, I will!  If you've got a good recipe, let me know! :smileyhappy: 

 

The goopy stuff comes off the seeds, you just have to work at it....wiping with paper towels...it leaves them slimy, but that is sauted off when cooking.   I use a low heat in the frying pan, with the oil and seasonings...so I don't burn them, and the spices.  To be honest, I wash them when I don't feel like messing with that goopy stuff! :smileyvery-happy:

 

Yes, give me your "odd" squash pie...and no, I've never heard of an ugly squash...I've seen some pretty weird and obscene ones while working produce (actually I've seen a lot of weird and funny produce), and I've seen the "Ugly Tomatoes",  grown to be ugly, which are down-right ugly, but no ugly squash. LOL

 

K.

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the pumpkin


KathyS wrote:


 

I see your way is better,,,much better!.....I assume the blender takes the stringiness out of the pumpkin.  The soup reminds me of a pumpkin soup I had that was to die for. I'd never tasted anything like it...it was one of the courses at a friends house, and I could have made a meal on that, alone!  I've never made it, but one of these days....when the weather gets cold, I will!  If you've got a good recipe, let me know! :smileyhappy: 

 

The goopy stuff comes off the seeds, you just have to work at it....wiping with paper towels...it leaves them slimy, but that is sauted off when cooking.   I use a low heat in the frying pan, with the oil and seasonings...so I don't burn them, and the spices.  To be honest, I wash them when I don't feel like messing with that goopy stuff! :smileyvery-happy:

 

Yes, give me your "odd" squash pie...and no, I've never heard of an ugly squash...I've seen some pretty weird and obscene ones while working produce (actually I've seen a lot of weird and funny produce), and I've seen the "Ugly Tomatoes",  grown to be ugly, which are down-right ugly, but no ugly squash. LOL

 

K.


Hmm well if your pumpkins are always stringy, you're not getting good pumpkins. Too dry growing. A good one has clean solid flesh. (shrug)Though no mater which kind you get, a bake and chopper will smooth it out.

 

I just put mine in the cogather, and put them under running water, slide my finger through a few times and they come clean. When it's really sticky, your pumpkin wasn't fresh. A little lemon juice will help.

 

Ok an ugly squash looks like a green, yellow, and orange striped bumby lumby squash. I'm sure they have another name, but around here the sticky label has a number and just the word ugly on it.


 

Ugly squash pie

 

Use the method used for pumpkin with the ugly. But when baked it should come out soft with a spoon and a fork mashed will do the job. 

 

1 cooked ugly squashed squash

2 eggs

1/2 cup of cream (condends milk is good too)

pinch of salt

pinch of nutmeg

1 cup of shredded cheese (anything that melts smooth works, I use sharp cheddar)

1 pie crust in pan half way thawed out, poke a few small holes when still frozen

 

Mix cheese and squash, level into crust. Mix cream, eggs, salt, and nutmeg until smooth; and poor over. Use a dull knife to sink in egg mixture.Slide into a 375 oven and bake until your dull knife slid in comes clean. Allow to cool to a warm state, slice and enjoy. Kinda quishe, kinda pie like, excellent lunch.


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KathyS
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Re: Using up the pumpkin


TiggerBear wrote:

Hmm well if your pumpkins are always stringy, you're not getting good pumpkins. Too dry growing. A good one has clean solid flesh. (shrug)Though no mater which kind you get, a bake and chopper will smooth it out.

I just put mine in the cogather, and put them under running water, slide my finger through a few times and they come clean. When it's really sticky, your pumpkin wasn't fresh. A little lemon juice will help.

 

Ok an ugly squash looks like a green, yellow, and orange striped bumby lumby squash. I'm sure they have another name, but around here the sticky label has a number and just the word ugly on it.


 

Ugly squash pie

 

Use the method used for pumpkin with the ugly. But when baked it should come out soft with a spoon and a fork mashed will do the job. 

 

1 cooked ugly squashed squash

2 eggs

1/2 cup of cream (condends milk is good too)

pinch of salt

pinch of nutmeg

1 cup of shredded cheese (anything that melts smooth works, I use sharp cheddar)

1 pie crust in pan half way thawed out, poke a few small holes when still frozen

 

Mix cheese and squash, level into crust. Mix cream, eggs, salt, and nutmeg until smooth; and poor over. Use a dull knife to sink in egg mixture.Slide into a 375 oven and bake until your dull knife slid in comes clean. Allow to cool to a warm state, slice and enjoy. Kinda quishe, kinda pie like, excellent lunch.


I don't know about the pumpkins...I don't grow them, I've only seen the ones used at Halloween...I know there are baking pumpkins,  more flesh, but I've never seen them sold here.  We have a farmers market, maybe I should ask them. 

 

That pie recipe sounds delicious....so you don't mix the egg/cream mixture into it?  Just cut it in, huh...interesting.  BTW, how big are these ugly spuashes?  I've seen nubby green/yellow, hard shelled squash, almost like a small gourd.  I can't think of the name of them....they aren't very big.  I'll have to look in the store.... Are they orange flesh, or yellow?

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TiggerBear
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Re: Using up the pumpkin


KathyS wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

Hmm well if your pumpkins are always stringy, you're not getting good pumpkins. Too dry growing. A good one has clean solid flesh. (shrug)Though no mater which kind you get, a bake and chopper will smooth it out.

I just put mine in the cogather, and put them under running water, slide my finger through a few times and they come clean. When it's really sticky, your pumpkin wasn't fresh. A little lemon juice will help.

 

Ok an ugly squash looks like a green, yellow, and orange striped bumby lumby squash. I'm sure they have another name, but around here the sticky label has a number and just the word ugly on it.


 

Ugly squash pie

 

Use the method used for pumpkin with the ugly. But when baked it should come out soft with a spoon and a fork mashed will do the job. 

 

1 cooked ugly squashed squash

2 eggs

1/2 cup of cream (condends milk is good too)

pinch of salt

pinch of nutmeg

1 cup of shredded cheese (anything that melts smooth works, I use sharp cheddar)

1 pie crust in pan half way thawed out, poke a few small holes when still frozen

 

Mix cheese and squash, level into crust. Mix cream, eggs, salt, and nutmeg until smooth; and poor over. Use a dull knife to sink in egg mixture.Slide into a 375 oven and bake until your dull knife slid in comes clean. Allow to cool to a warm state, slice and enjoy. Kinda quishe, kinda pie like, excellent lunch.


I don't know about the pumpkins...I don't grow them, I've only seen the ones used at Halloween...I know there are baking pumpkins,  more flesh, but I've never seen them sold here.  We have a farmers market, maybe I should ask them. 

 

That pie recipe sounds delicious....so you don't mix the egg/cream mixture into it?  Just cut it in, huh...interesting.  BTW, how big are these ugly spuashes?  I've seen nubby green/yellow, hard shelled squash, almost like a small gourd.  I can't think of the name of them....they aren't very big.  I'll have to look in the store.... Are they orange flesh, or yellow?


Yep, a cooking pumpkin is not a jackolantern pumpkin. Jacks are a hybrid form.

 

Yeah you just want it to sink in good. Around the size of a butternut, a bit more heavy when you hold it. They're all the above, striped. They not those dried goards though. You've probaly seen them and just not known what they were. I try new food on a lark, that's how I found them. This weeks discovery, the pilute.

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KathyS
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Re: Using up the pumpkin


TiggerBear wrote:

Yep, a cooking pumpkin is not a jackolantern pumpkin. Jacks are a hybrid form.

 

Yeah you just want it to sink in good. Around the size of a butternut, a bit more heavy when you hold it. They're all the above, striped. They not those dried goards though. You've probaly seen them and just not known what they were. I try new food on a lark, that's how I found them. This weeks discovery, the pilute.


TiggerBear, did you mean the  Pluot  ?  I tried Googling Pilute....try it and see what shows up. LOL

 

I've eaten Pluots, but they're not my favorite fruit...I'm not a big plum eater, either.

 

I've used the star fruit for fruit platter decorations...really a neat look...  When working for Albertsons, and a new fruit would come it, we would try them.  We had to, to tell the customers what they tasted like.  Customers ALWAYS ask (and if not, you ask them)  But with some fruit, you have to know how long to wait for it to ripen.  You can't just eat it as soon as it comes in and goes on the display tables.  And about the time they are ripe, they throw them away!  There is a fine line for ordering, displaying, and tossing them.

 

Plantains are something I've never tried, mainly because you have to wait until they turn black, and fry/cook them...They're not something you can eat off the shelf.  Depends on the area your store is in, as to how they sell.  If a customer has never seen them before, they think they're rotten bananas!

 

A lot of these new exotic fruits don't sell, for a couple of reasons....too exotic, and too expensive.....but we had to carry them anyway, just incase someone asked for them...it was all a big waste of food and money, throwing these expensive fruits away.  

 

I'd demo a lot of these things, just to get the customer aquainted with them...and it was a waste of my time, since I had other work to do.... My biggest gripe.  But the best thing was, if I saw a customer looking over a particular fruit, I'd come up to them and ask if they'd like to try it.  That, more often than not, sold the product.  I wrote a letter to our company, when we were out on strike, about how much food is wasted in the market.  How much money is lost every day.  I worked all departments, at one time or another, and I knew what and how much we should carry....but they always wanted, not just their produce tables, but all shelves and cases stuffed to the top...just for looks.  Just stupid marketing, in most cases.  Grrrrrrrrrrr.  How did I get on this topic! LOL  Boy, something pushed my button!