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badriya
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Harry potter

Hi everybody,

although the number of the fans of Harry potter increased,there are parents who don't let their children read or watch Harry potter.
I'd like to know the point of view of these parents who prevent their children to enjoy Harry potter
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Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Harry potter


badriya wrote:
Hi everybody,

although the number of the fans of Harry potter increased,there are parents who don't let their children read or watch Harry potter.
I'd like to know the point of view of these parents who prevent their children to enjoy Harry potter




Look in the other Forum under "Waiting for Harry" under the topic "Faith vs Fiction"

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/bn/board/message?board.id=HarryPotter&;message.id=157&jump=true
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patnorb
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Harry potter



badriya wrote:
Hi everybody,

although the number of the fans of Harry potter increased,there are parents who don't let their children read or watch Harry potter.
I'd like to know the point of view of these parents who prevent their children to enjoy Harry potter




Hi, all. I am extremely brand new to this book club and will work to catch up on as many of the threads as quickly as possible.

I have a younger brother with three sons (one 9-year-old step-son - his wife's from her first marriage - and two under three with his wife). Although I am the eldest of my brood of siblings and he falls towards the end of the progeny, he is by far the most conservative of us all. He and his wife are conservative Christians and they have stated unequivocally that their children will NEVER read the books nor view the films. They follow along with the rest of the conservative Christian movement to ban the HP books, arguing that they not only tout the heathen world or "devil-worshipping" sorcerers and witches but use subliminal message to corrupt the minds and souls of believers. My response has always been, "Rubbish" - a sanitized version for purposes of this discussion in mixed public :-). I am Christian myself (raised Roman Catholic and now United Methodist) and have never felt influenced nor compelled toward renouncing my faith as a result of reading these beautifully written books.

Great art - written, sung or drawn - uplifts the human spirit to wondrous heights. That is what happens to my children and me as we have worked our way through the Harry Potter series.

However, we must accept that there are those who will always feel as my brother and his wife do. We cannot change their points of view, nor should we forcibly try to do so. Offer our opinion and leave them to consider it. "Free Will" should always be recognized and celebrated. Although they and their children are definitely missing out on one of the greatest triumphs of Literature.
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zman
Posts: 101
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Harry potter

Patnorb, I agree with you in general, but calling the Harry Potter series one of the "greatest triumphs in literature" is going too far for me. I suppose it depends on how you define "triumph", but I digress.

I also have family members that refuse to allow their children to have anything to do with the Harry Potter books or movies, and I agree with your assessment that opposing viewpoints should be politely acknowledged, but I won't pull any of my punches in this matter.

We all choose the mythologies that resonate within our unique and individual souls. Your relatives, and mine, have chosen their specific mythology, and "magic" in the Harry Potter sense poses a threat to that mythology. But let's be honest - there is no empirical proof one can give to the veracity of any mythology. It is all a question of faith.

I would never ask anyone to renounce their personal beliefs, but I would ask that they at least acknowledge the fact that ALL metaphysics is a matter of personal faith and choice. But I know I'm asking the impossible. There will always be people who insist that their "truth" is an objective truth.
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Phule
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Harry potter

When the books first came out and were being condemned for being "magical" I bought and read the first one (and then all the other's as fast as they came out) before I would let my grandchildren read them.

I have rarely found a parent, Christian or otherwise who has read the books, but still wouldn't let their children read them. If you "read" the books you will find that the Harry Potter novels are no more about magic than westerns are about animal husbandry.

In fact, in most cases the Wizards laugh at all the magic "we" see presented as real in our world. Palmistry, Tea Leaves, Crystal Ball Gazing, etc. are all ridiculed as a very doubtful brand of magic.

In the first book when Hagrid is explaining things to Harry, he tells Harry that the reason the magical community conceals its existence from the Muggles is that, if the Muggles knew about magic, they would come to be dependent on magical solutions to their problems rather than working things out for themselves.

There is also a strong moral thread running throughout the books. Face up to your fears, stand up for what you believe in--even against peer pressure, evil must not be ignored, love has the power to conquer evil, etc. I don't believe any of these are anti-Christian messages.

Not sure this really answered the question proposed at the start of the thread, but maybe it will help someone to overcome their fears.

Kent
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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Harry potter

The questions of faith and religious practice, as well as questions about moral and spiritual values are really interesting to look at with the HP books. And do pop over and take a look at the discussion underway in the "Waiting for Harry" book club.

Rachel
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idontplayballet5
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Harry potter

i really have no idea why parents dont let thier children read this very entertaining book...I would think that they for sure would because it is so advertourous, and works the mind!!

No offence to some people!!

Sorry, i know i didnt help, but i just wanted to state the point of it!!
TAY!
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Becs_Aunt
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Harry potter

My niece and I read the books together. She has some friends whose parents are very christian. I do bring up (gently) in conversation how amazing this or that passage we just read was, how much I admire Harry's loyalty and bravery, and other good things. I do this to the parents and to the kids.
The fact is, one day, these very curious and intelligent children will be old enough to make up their own minds. And, I hope that my gentle cheerleading (and their friendship with Bec) will get them to start reading the books. Parents have some control over very small children, but lose it as the kids get older. That is where we will win. If you and your children sing Harry's praises (and JK's talent), then your friends' kids and nieces and nephews will pick them up when they are 14 or so. They will see that there is nothing to fear. And, as a side benefit, they may start to question the strict, illogical beliefs of their parents.
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Kathleen1
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Harry potter

I too see the moral thread in the books. I see how the children choose good over evil. My children are allowed to read the books. When I heard of the aguements against the books - I read the available books. I wasn't going to blindly band them.
On the other hand there are several teenagers and twenty year olds that call themselves "Wickens". Is this because of the literature, movies and games - that teaches them about witches, demons, and vampires?




Phule wrote:
When the books first came out and were being condemned for being "magical" I bought and read the first one (and then all the other's as fast as they came out) before I would let my grandchildren read them.

I have rarely found a parent, Christian or otherwise who has read the books, but still wouldn't let their children read them. If you "read" the books you will find that the Harry Potter novels are no more about magic than westerns are about animal husbandry.

In fact, in most cases the Wizards laugh at all the magic "we" see presented as real in our world. Palmistry, Tea Leaves, Crystal Ball Gazing, etc. are all ridiculed as a very doubtful brand of magic.

In the first book when Hagrid is explaining things to Harry, he tells Harry that the reason the magical community conceals its existence from the Muggles is that, if the Muggles knew about magic, they would come to be dependent on magical solutions to their problems rather than working things out for themselves.

There is also a strong moral thread running throughout the books. Face up to your fears, stand up for what you believe in--even against peer pressure, evil must not be ignored, love has the power to conquer evil, etc. I don't believe any of these are anti-Christian messages.

Not sure this really answered the question proposed at the start of the thread, but maybe it will help someone to overcome their fears.

Kent


csb
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csb
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Harry potter

It all begins with one's belief in the supernatural. If you believe in magic, demons, and witchcraft, then you make your choices from there regarding HP's influence on society. My family just doesn't believe in it, so we have had a wonderful time being entertaining in all medias by HP and JKR not to mention the other hundreds of books and other media that deals with fact and fiction. HP is only a drop in the bucket when you explore what's available in the local library under the fantasy category. And the fact that those opposed to HP's "fantasy" because they believe it is based fact spend so much time fighting it displays a sad testimony to how their lives are spent. I feel very sorry for their children, not at all because they are missing something fun like HP, they can find that later in life, but I believe their parents are spending so much time chasing shadows and that they could not possibly have enough time to spend with their children.
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Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Wiccan

Kathleen wrote:
I too see the moral thread in the books. I see how the children choose good over evil. My children are allowed to read the books. When I heard of the aguements against the books - I read the available books. I wasn't going to blindly band them.
On the other hand there are several teenagers and twenty year olds that call themselves "Wickens". Is this because of the literature, movies and games - that teaches them about witches, demons, and vampires?
---------------------------------

I think you are referring to Wiccans. This is a New Age spirituality that predates Harry Potter by more than 50 years. I don't believe Wiccans engage in evil or black magic type stuff. I think it is similar to the many other New Age spiritual movements. The terms they use, however, may cause people to think otherwise because of historical "evil" associations. Their "magic" is mainly ritualistic. Here is a reference that should explain it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicca
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potterd
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Harry potter

One of the reasons I love these books is because of the moral lessons. Not to mention the role model of watching another teenager deal with the stress of life including going to a new school, meeting new friends, ect. I was brought up Christian and have a pretty strong faith, but I was also taught that no thing is evil in itself. Drinking alcohol can be plesant, however, when it comes before worship it is a sin. So, reading a good book about wizzards is great, as long as you don't stay home from church to read it, or start worshipping the author instead of God. Sorry to rant, but I personally think that people who take it too far are missing out on a lot of good books. I can't help but wonder how the children who are so sheltered will be able to cope with the real world when they grow up.

One last point, and I apologize for digressing, have you ever listened to some of the devout Christians who ban these books? I knew one when I was younger, she was my age and swore she could see the demons in the world, walking around like you and me. She also had to bless her house every week to keep the bad spirits out. Stephen King was not scary compared to her. I was looking under my bed for weeks for the boogyman who I couldn't see, but she could. I know she believed strongly in her faith, and am happy that she was content with that life, but sometimes, a little ignorance is bliss.
I can't help but remember her whenever someone mentions that reading a book about witches will hand your soul to the devil.

Obviously I'm a little biased. It would be eye-opening, as you mentioned, to see the other side of the story. :smileyhappy:
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Kathleen1
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Wiccan

Thanks Nadine I didn't think of Googling it.
I had first heard of Wiccans in the summer of 2006. My sister in law was very upset about some women she met that are witches and was telling the family- I wasn't listening to her story and then she announced loudly that my son has friends that are Wiccans! and that I need to intervene. Well I looked into it and apparently this Wiccan trend is pretty strong. Even some of my technicians practice rituals.
Ah but to CSB summed it up best for me. Harry Potter is entertaining.
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patnorb
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Harry potter

I really enjoyed your reply, zman. Your points about mythology actually brought me back to the PBS series some years back with Bill Moyers and Joseph Campbell discussing the power and nature of mythology.

Anyway, as to the definition of literary success, I have a fairly simple idea of what constitutes success. Beyond mere critical acclaim and commercial appeal, if a piece launches intense discussion and exhaustive examination of issues and ideas, it is a success. The HP series has accomplished this to an extraordinary level. I know young people who have "devoured" these books with relish who would normally have preferred root canal to reading. Families, such as mine, have turned these books into a sharing activity. Each entry in the series is awaited with eagerness bordering on fanaticism. Even Stephen King, in his memoir "On Writing", cites JKR as a great storyteller and writer. And, while as many would vilify Mr. King as extol his virtues, no one can deny his broad commercial success.

Hmm, I said simple definition, didn't I? Sorry for the diatribe. My English professor in college always had a difficult time keeping me to his ideal of "concise". :-)

Pat



zman wrote:
Patnorb, I agree with you in general, but calling the Harry Potter series one of the "greatest triumphs in literature" is going too far for me. I suppose it depends on how you define "triumph", but I digress.

I also have family members that refuse to allow their children to have anything to do with the Harry Potter books or movies, and I agree with your assessment that opposing viewpoints should be politely acknowledged, but I won't pull any of my punches in this matter.

We all choose the mythologies that resonate within our unique and individual souls. Your relatives, and mine, have chosen their specific mythology, and "magic" in the Harry Potter sense poses a threat to that mythology. But let's be honest - there is no empirical proof one can give to the veracity of any mythology. It is all a question of faith.

I would never ask anyone to renounce their personal beliefs, but I would ask that they at least acknowledge the fact that ALL metaphysics is a matter of personal faith and choice. But I know I'm asking the impossible. There will always be people who insist that their "truth" is an objective truth.


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suzie_q_loves_dumbledore
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
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Re: Wiccan



Kathleen1 wrote:
Thanks Nadine I didn't think of Googling it.
I had first heard of Wiccans in the summer of 2006. My sister in law was very upset about some women she met that are witches and was telling the family- I wasn't listening to her story and then she announced loudly that my son has friends that are Wiccans! and that I need to intervene. Well I looked into it and apparently this Wiccan trend is pretty strong. Even some of my technicians practice rituals.
Ah but to CSB summed it up best for me. Harry Potter is entertaining.





'Wiccans' have been around for centuries, albeit going under many different names. As to the ritual theme behind witchcraft- most religions have a ritualistic basis, and even non religious people use social rituals in their everyday life. It may not have the same spiritual impact, but acts of communication are still ritualistic.
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momofHarryfans
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Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Harry potter

Hello. I am new to the message board, so I am going to give this a try. When the Harry Potter books and movies first came out I really wasn't into them at all. My husband took my kids to go see the first movie and they liked it so much that they came home talking about it, so I brought the book and read it. Afterwards I watched the movie and realized that I was rooting for Harry. Soon after I continue to buy all the movies and the books and now have the collection of both for all 3 of my children, who enjoy to watch and read them all the time. My little girl who is 7 years old especially loves the movies because she likes it when Harry fights the "Evil One" and shows that good always wins and also likes when Ron says "Bloody Hell." I really don't think there is anything wrong with the books or the movies, but there are parents out there that have their feelings about these movies and books and we have to respect that.
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agnijay
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Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Harry potter

Well, I my self am only thirteen, but some of you may or may not heard of "Banned Book Week." Every year, my school librarian talks to us about why books are banned. The leading reason that these books are banned is because parents are afraid their children will "learn witchcraft." Of course this is nonsense, if every book was thought of this way, only few would be on shelves. My aunt and uncle themselves forbid their children (12, 10, and 7) from watching the movies because if Lupin's werewolf transformation in the Prisoner of Azkaban. Of course they are not allowed to watch Power Rangers either, but some parents are just very protective, and if a movie is rated PG-13, parents will naturally assume that the book will have the same content, thus causing them to prohibit the books and movies. My dad of course started reading me the first chapter when I was 5 and then permitted me to continue reading the books.
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Thomas_T
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Harry potter

When ever I get someone in the store who is against Harry Potter do to thier religion, I always try to gently recommend John Granger's Looking for God in Harry Potter. The book is interesting, as is the author's story. The blurb we have in our internal system is: John Granger, a devout Christian, teacher of classic literature, and father of seven children, first read the Harry Potter books so he could explain to his children why they weren’t allowed to read them. After intense study, however, he became convinced that the books are underestimated as literature--and reflect important Christian truths.



badriya wrote:
Hi everybody,

although the number of the fans of Harry potter increased,there are parents who don't let their children read or watch Harry potter.
I'd like to know the point of view of these parents who prevent their children to enjoy Harry potter


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