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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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An Older, Wiser Harry?

Well-rounded, fully-developed characters are characters who change and grow -- and Harry certainly qualifies. For example, Harry becomes angriest when taunted about his parents' death. However, by book three, when he faces Peter, the person who led Voldemort to his parents, he stops Lupin and Black from killing Peter, saying, "I don't reckon my dad would've wanted them to become killers -- just for you." What other instances of increasing maturity in Harry can you find in Prisoner of Azkaban?

Rowling seems to move into a darker tone, delving into emotionally murkier waters in Prisoner of Azkaban. As Harry matures, the series also seems to push us into facing a more complex moral universe, and a darker mood. What are some notable example of this change in Azkaban?
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redwing480
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎01-23-2007
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Re: An Older, Wiser Harry?



rkubie wrote:
Well-rounded, fully-developed characters are characters who change and grow -- and Harry certainly qualifies. For example, Harry becomes angriest when taunted about his parents' death. However, by book three, when he faces Peter, the person who led Voldemort to his parents, he stops Lupin and Black from killing Peter, saying, "I don't reckon my dad would've wanted them to become killers -- just for you." What other instances of increasing maturity in Harry can you find in Prisoner of Azkaban?

Rowling seems to move into a darker tone, delving into emotionally murkier waters in Prisoner of Azkaban. As Harry matures, the series also seems to push us into facing a more complex moral universe, and a darker mood. What are some notable example of this change in Azkaban?




I think that the episode with Buckbeak's execution, the kids come to realize that no matter how hard they researched and no matter what supporting evidence they found for Buckbeak, that the outcome just wasn't fair. This parallels to real life that sometimes life just isn't fair and that there is corruption and lies all around us. I think that the kids are growing up and starting to see things for what they really are, they are starting to realize that the adult world is very complicated. This episode also points out the fact that it doesn't matter WHY Buckbeak attacked Malfoy, but that he DID, and what Malfoy did, even though it was wrong falls by the wayside.
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jftapia88
Posts: 474
Registered: ‎02-01-2007
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Re: An Older, Wiser Harry? **Spoiler**


rkubie wrote:
Well-rounded, fully-developed characters are characters who change and grow -- and Harry certainly qualifies. For example, Harry becomes angriest when taunted about his parents' death. However, by book three, when he faces Peter, the person who led Voldemort to his parents, he stops Lupin and Black from killing Peter, saying, "I don't reckon my dad would've wanted them to become killers -- just for you." What other instances of increasing maturity in Harry can you find in Prisoner of Azkaban?

Rowling seems to move into a darker tone, delving into emotionally murkier waters in Prisoner of Azkaban. As Harry matures, the series also seems to push us into facing a more complex moral universe, and a darker mood. What are some notable example of this change in Azkaban?


at the very end when harry realizes that dumbldore cant fix everything. he feels as though his world has been pulled out from under him when dd cant make them beleive that sirius is innocent, and stop the ministry form acting like assholes.

"He had grown used to the idea that Dumbledore could solve anything. He had expected Dumbledore to pull some amazing solution out of the sir. But no..." pg.393 united states paperback.

he realizes that life isnt always fair and you just have to 'roll with the punches', there is nothing you can do about it. or is there? hahaha
Julie
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