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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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The Outsiders

Prisoner of Azkaban features several characters who seem to be "outsiders" in some way -- Sirius is a wanted criminal, Lupin has to hide his werewolf nature -- the nature of the "good guys" is apparently to be on the fringes of respectability. Is this a purposeful move away from the idea of the obvious or "official" hero?
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redwing480
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Registered: ‎01-23-2007
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Re: The Outsiders



rkubie wrote:
Prisoner of Azkaban features several characters who seem to be "outsiders" in some way -- Sirius is a wanted criminal, Lupin has to hide his werewolf nature -- the nature of the "good guys" is apparently to be on the fringes of respectability. Is this a purposeful move away from the idea of the obvious or "official" hero?




Well, I think in any conflict that besides the obvious "hero" there are always supporting people or characters that play a big part in the accomplishments of the hero. Usually, our heroes would not have been able to accomplish as much as they do without some help. I think the fact of the good guys being on the fringes of society has to do with the fact that they like our "hero" and want him to succeed, and that they want to have a part in the success but because of their status would have a hard time doing these things themselves and in getting followers. Sirius, with everyone beleiving him to be a criminal, would probably never be given the chance to speak his thoughts and ideas, and even if he was able to get someone to listen, they would not take him seriously and would not trust him. It's pretty much the same with Lupin, even though he is not a criminal, he is different and people tend to be afraid of what they do not truly understand or know. A lot of times just knowing that you've contributed to the success of someone else is enough.
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Bookladt
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Outsiders



rkubie wrote:
Prisoner of Azkaban features several characters who seem to be "outsiders" in some way -- Sirius is a wanted criminal, Lupin has to hide his werewolf nature -- the nature of the "good guys" is apparently to be on the fringes of respectability. Is this a purposeful move away from the idea of the obvious or "official" hero?


All heroes have a following and I agree with other posters who said that not all those who support a "hero" are within the general population of "normal" people. Those who are marginal people who would not normally have a say in the way things work hope that the "hero" would remember them as well when he achieves greatness. In Harry's case these marginal people have great importance to what happens to him and to who he is becoming. Dobby, Lupin, Sirius, Hagrid, Firenze, all represent some marginalized group that the wizarding world underestimates. As Harry matures he sees the discrepancies and begins to disagree with those. Dobby best described that in the last book as the difference between Harry "greatness" and Harry's "goodness". Harry is beginning to understand those differences and how seemingly small details become large stumbling blocks for many in the magical community. I think that even tho he groans every time Hermoine brings up S.P.E.W., he truly understands the issues that are at stake.
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lacalladita
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007
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Re: The Outsiders

I do think it is a purposeful ove on JKR's part to have Sirius and Lupi as heroes. It is another way of saying don't judge a book by its cover. People come in all shapes and sizes. So why not heroes, too? Even though first impressions are always important but they are not always correct.



rkubie wrote:
Prisoner of Azkaban features several characters who seem to be "outsiders" in some way -- Sirius is a wanted criminal, Lupin has to hide his werewolf nature -- the nature of the "good guys" is apparently to be on the fringes of respectability. Is this a purposeful move away from the idea of the obvious or "official" hero?


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DoriBluefish
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Registered: ‎02-21-2007
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Re: The Outsiders



lacalladita wrote:
I do think it is a purposeful ove on JKR's part to have Sirius and Lupi as heroes. It is another way of saying don't judge a book by its cover. People come in all shapes and sizes. So why not heroes, too? Even though first impressions are always important but they are not always correct.



rkubie wrote:
Prisoner of Azkaban features several characters who seem to be "outsiders" in some way -- Sirius is a wanted criminal, Lupin has to hide his werewolf nature -- the nature of the "good guys" is apparently to be on the fringes of respectability. Is this a purposeful move away from the idea of the obvious or "official" hero?







This also plays into disucussions about Harry wanting to be normal, and nothing more. Harry wants not to be a hero, but is compellled to help stop evil and people doing bad. Is it only Harry's morals that drive his desire to stop evil? How does Harry have good moral values, with only the Dursleys to model behavior for him?
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LizzieAnn
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Outsiders

I think it's to show that it's not easy to define a hero; that heroic actions are performed by those from whom it seems unlikely. I also like to think that it's also a bit of "Don't judge the book by its cover." Just because someone doesn't fit a stereotypical idea of what a hero should be or look like, it doesn't mean that person is capable of heroic deeds. Good and evil aren't always easy to discern and it takes reading a person's character and actions to learn what a person is truly like.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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