To an adolescent desperate to be seen as cool and kind of wild in her tightest jeans and tarted-up eyeliner, there’s pretty much nothing more mortifying than when the high school’s hottest bad boy pretty much pats her on the head and says something to the effect of, “Hey, kid. What’s with the war paint? Go back home and study for an English test or something, girl scout.”

 

Or, um, at least I’ve heard it could go that way.

 

Ugh. I was raised to be a Very Nice Girl (VNG).  And like many VNGs I know, my fantasies ran toward the wicked and included the dirtiest bad boys my classic-literature saturated mind could conjure.  Unfortunately, I got the sense not many real-life bad boys were dreaming up fantasies of nerdly little VNGs with aspirations of being dirty enough for Very Bad Boys.

Yet as I now understand it, some bad boys – who can sport some pretty appealing traits beneath their only-out-for-what-I-can-score sexy exteriors -- actually do have fantasies about Naughty VNGs. And you can catch a hard-core hot ‘n satisfying read about the reality of those fantasies when you tap into Victoria Dahl’s fun and touching “Lead Me On  .”

 

Buttoned-down office manager Jane Morgan’s new VNG life is ordered, professional and successful. She’s efficiently locked away her childhood pain, and mostly cut off relations with her prisoner-groupie mom. Trashy no more – at least she keeps trying not to think of herself that way – Jane lives a sophisticated life in a small, pleasant town, is respected, and certainly only associates with men who are respectable.

 

So why is big, tatted, skull-trimmed dynamite expert William Chase firing up every last one of Jane’s carefully numbed bad-girl nerves until she’s offering him a one-night deal of sweaty, hot, dirty-girl-rides-Harley-bad-boy-to-glory satisfaction?

 

Well, because that’s the real Jane, the one she can’t seem to keep tamed under wraps of tasteful pencil skirts and severe chignons.  Yet the real Chase isn’t who Jane believes him to be either – or perhaps wants him to be. 

Chase is pretty blown away by Jane’s naughty-librarian chic and sweet intelligence. And he’s definitely ready to step up to the plate and call on connections to help when Jane’s brother becomes a murder suspect. 

 

But eventually even nice bad boys have their limits when it comes to being used to save the day – or maybe just used – and the always-in-control Chase decides maybe the alpha beast that Jane adores so in bed – or against the dashboard and other delicious locations – can be used in a slightly different way to get her to see there’s more to William Chase than meets the bod.

 

What do you love about the Very Naughty Good Girl heroine? Why is she perfect for the Very Good Bad Boy?

"Talk Me Down   and "Start Me Up  " precede "Lead Me On" in Dahl's sexy/fun stand-alone trilogy. She also writes historical romance. Her current title is "One Week As Lovers ." 

Comments
by Moderator becke_davis on ‎01-11-2010 01:54 PM

I am a HUGE fan of Victoria Dahl's books -- both her contemporaries AND her historicals. I can hardly wait to read this one!

by on ‎01-11-2010 05:44 PM

Well that certainly looks like a really interesting book, thanks.

by PrincessBumblebee on ‎01-11-2010 06:36 PM

QB, you had me at big, tatted, skull-trimmed, hehe! Not to mention the part about the Harley. I think they need to turn the heat OFF, hehe. I've  never read Victoria Dahl, but I just love the buttoned-up librarian type coming undone by the ultimate bad boy. Definately have to add this to my TBR pile! My checkbooks screaming, hehe.

by Cheyenne_Catina on ‎01-11-2010 07:08 PM

i havent read any of victoria dahl's historicals, but ive kept up as her contemporary series has come out, i just read lead me on friday...

i really liked lead me on, altho my fave was talk me down...

i like the "prim" ibrarian meeting the "ultimate bad boy " scenario too, i think its nice the way they can each fall for theyre total oppostie

by Joan_P on ‎01-11-2010 07:15 PM

Those will all go on my wish list!! :smileyhappy:

Thanks,

-J

by amyskf on ‎01-11-2010 10:03 PM

I think the naughty VNG ends up being more wild -- taking more risks than the bad boy, but she's still that VNG underneath it all, or no, she's the naughty girl underneath...you know what I mean. Any time a heroine keeps the hero guessing seems to lead to great banter and even greater sex.

 

I lurve her historicals. Gotta get this one.

by Moderator dhaupt on ‎01-12-2010 11:18 AM

Ah, so many authors I haven't read so little time. I have not had the pleasure of reading Ms. Dahl, but it looks like that will soon be remedied.

I love the very naughty good girl heroine, you know the one's with the tight button down business suit who always wears sexy underthings and who is a hel-cat behind closed doors, you know when the hero in the novel just sort of gets those big buggy eyes when he realizes just what's in store for him.

Yowza!!!

Deb ;-)

by 1lovealways on ‎01-13-2010 02:30 AM

Hi Everyone!

 

I love the strait-laced good girl that hides the naughty girl underneath and the good naughty boy. That is what draws you to the story in the first place.  Two people who are really very much alike, but one is hiding their true personality.  It makes me wonder how the author will resolve this dilemma that the heroine has gotten herself into or the hero for that matter. That is the meat of the story and where you discover everything.

 

Sometimes it is something that she uses as a ruse and at other times it isn't.  More often than not the naughty girl is her true personality, but she is hiding behind what others think she should be or what she has deemed as what she needs to get what she wants.  Her true personality she only reveals to herself and to the good naughty boy when he gets her to be herself.

 

The good naughty boy never hides who he is. Well, most of the time, he doesn't.  He's both good and naughty from the beginning showing both sides of who he is all the time.  I think this is why the heroine falls for him.  She is intrigued by what he represents, but not by him.  He represents a freedom that she can have only with him.  And of course, he wants to be seen as more than a play toy by her. 

 

This scenario brings to mind an old book that is still one of my all time favorites.  Lightning that Lingers by Tom & Sharon Curtis is a classic about a meek librarian who falls for a guy who is a stripper at a women's club.  In this case the heroine really is who she seems and the hero is a good naughty boy.  This story had a twist to it that I never saw coming.  Him being a stripper and her a librarian was what kept you reading to see how these two were going to come together.  It was a total impossibility. 

 

I've never read any of Ms. Dahl's books, but they will definitely go on my Wish List! :smileyhappy:

 

 

by Fiction2Lov on ‎01-29-2011 01:04 AM

Dahl is on the wish list for 2011...Looking for more so if you have any books to recommend.

 

Thanks

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