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donyskiw
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Reading Business

One of the things I really like about the new BN Book Clubs is we do have time to read a long book. Under the old format, we could never have read Moby Dick. By the time I finish the books I'm reading, my edition should be here. Part of my classics reading experience is the aesthetics. I read Library of America editions, which I subscribe to, or order if I want an edition now (like Melville's Redburn, Moby Dick, White Jacket) or, if they have not published it then Random House's Everyman's editions. Both can be purchased from Barnes and Noble and both websites have hot links back to BN. I also like the supplemental info that these volumes provide so I'd rather wait for them when I order them than read online or print out pages or borrow it from the library. The books are themselves works of art in my opinion.

Like I said, this new format is great for being able to tackle big books. I love big books. But we could never have read Moby Dick or some of the other large volumes of great literature under the old format. I know they did a course, rather than a discussion, of Anna Karenina which was a wonderful novel. I am looking forward to someday reading War and Peace and now we can do it here but would never have been able to do it on BNU. BUT NOT IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS!

Denise
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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Reading Business

Denise, I'll be the first to join you in reading War and Peace. Laurel



donyskiw wrote:
One of the things I really like about the new BN Book Clubs is we do have time to read a long book. Under the old format, we could never have read Moby Dick. By the time I finish the books I'm reading, my edition should be here. Part of my classics reading experience is the aesthetics. I read Library of America editions, which I subscribe to, or order if I want an edition now (like Melville's Redburn, Moby Dick, White Jacket) or, if they have not published it then Random House's Everyman's editions. Both can be purchased from Barnes and Noble and both websites have hot links back to BN. I also like the supplemental info that these volumes provide so I'd rather wait for them when I order them than read online or print out pages or borrow it from the library. The books are themselves works of art in my opinion.

Like I said, this new format is great for being able to tackle big books. I love big books. But we could never have read Moby Dick or some of the other large volumes of great literature under the old format. I know they did a course, rather than a discussion, of Anna Karenina which was a wonderful novel. I am looking forward to someday reading War and Peace and now we can do it here but would never have been able to do it on BNU. BUT NOT IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS!

Denise


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
PaulK
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎11-02-2006
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Re: Reading Business

Denise you bring up what I think is the main improvement in the new format and that is the elimination of the one month restriction. I feel it could still use just a bit more structure and clearer start dates for discussions. However Bob and several of the regular participants have been working on improving this and it is getting better.
I have been using the BN Classic editions and find the introductions generally good and the notes helpful. Denise, how are the notes and introductions in the Library of America books?
I saw the Anna Karenina course but did not sign up. I bought the book thinking that they would repeat it but no luck. I hope we can have the chance to discuss it someday. I would also be keen to read and discuss War and Peace.






donyskiw wrote:
One of the things I really like about the new BN Book Clubs is we do have time to read a long book. Under the old format, we could never have read Moby Dick. By the time I finish the books I'm reading, my edition should be here. Part of my classics reading experience is the aesthetics. I read Library of America editions, which I subscribe to, or order if I want an edition now (like Melville's Redburn, Moby Dick, White Jacket) or, if they have not published it then Random House's Everyman's editions. Both can be purchased from Barnes and Noble and both websites have hot links back to BN. I also like the supplemental info that these volumes provide so I'd rather wait for them when I order them than read online or print out pages or borrow it from the library. The books are themselves works of art in my opinion.

Like I said, this new format is great for being able to tackle big books. I love big books. But we could never have read Moby Dick or some of the other large volumes of great literature under the old format. I know they did a course, rather than a discussion, of Anna Karenina which was a wonderful novel. I am looking forward to someday reading War and Peace and now we can do it here but would never have been able to do it on BNU. BUT NOT IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS!

Denise


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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: to Bob community room - Bushisms

[ Edited ]

fanuzzir wrote:
Ziki, I'd love to hear more about Bush or Shakira or whomever strikes our fancy. I hope for some off topic discussion as well. Is anyone giving a copy of the Iraq Study Group report to anyone for Christmas?





A 'Bushisms' calendar is proving very popular over here:smileyhappy:

'http://america-store.stores.yahoo.net/buca.html

I saw a great photo the other day of Bush with his father which was captioned 'Son, you're making the same mistake with Iraq as I made with your Mother. I didn't pull out in time'. :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by Choisya on 12-13-200602:04 PM

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: ? Choisya's dinner

[ Edited ]
Here is some info on that wonderful tradition Fanuzzir, for the gluttons among us:smileyhappy:. The nearest I'll come to Italian food at Xmas is the cake Panettone, of which I am very fond, and this year I will be opening some Lemon liquer which I bought when I went to Limone on the shores of Lake Lugano earlier this year.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art15171.asp

You may have heard of the cook Jamie Oliver, who has been trying to improve school dinners? He recently did a series of programmes called The Great Escape, where he travelled he length of Italy meeting Italians and cooking their regional dishes.; Yum!:-

http://www.channel4.com/life/microsites/J/jamies_great_escape/




fanuzzir wrote:
Ah, a fellow foodie. Do you know about the Italian tradition of seven courses of fish on Christmas eve? One for each sacrament of the Catholic Church. I'm not Catholic, and I'm not a glutton, so I don't cook seven courses, but it's great to plan a menu with such simple Italian antipasti and a great homeade clam sauce. I'm a big fan of Mario Batali cookbooks and Hazan's.
Bob

Message Edited by Choisya on 12-13-200602:19 PM

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Choisya
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Re: Reading Business

Me too! My favourite novel.




Laurel wrote:
Denise, I'll be the first to join you in reading War and Peace. Laurel



Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Are you listening Bob?

That's 4 for War and Peace already:smileyhappy::smileyhappy:




PaulK wrote:
Denise you bring up what I think is the main improvement in the new format and that is the elimination of the one month restriction. I feel it could still use just a bit more structure and clearer start dates for discussions. However Bob and several of the regular participants have been working on improving this and it is getting better.
I have been using the BN Classic editions and find the introductions generally good and the notes helpful. Denise, how are the notes and introductions in the Library of America books?
I saw the Anna Karenina course but did not sign up. I bought the book thinking that they would repeat it but no luck. I hope we can have the chance to discuss it someday. I would also be keen to read and discuss War and Peace.

Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Reading Business - War & Peace

Put me down for the fourth one on the list that would like to read War & Peace.

But I agree with Denise, we can't do all of this in the next couple of months. I too see the advantage of the extended format for reading books, especially classics. With the good moderators we have been getting, a bit more structure and organization, and some improvement in the software, these clubs could turn into a much better learning experience than the old BNU. A club with some structure to focus discussions, background "notes", and maybe some leading questions right up front certainly could help and give us essentially the same thing.

Bucky



Laurel wrote:
Denise, I'll be the first to join you in reading War and Peace. Laurel



donyskiw wrote:
One of the things I really like about the new BN Book Clubs is we do have time to read a long book. Under the old format, we could never have read Moby Dick. By the time I finish the books I'm reading, my edition should be here. Part of my classics reading experience is the aesthetics. I read Library of America editions, which I subscribe to, or order if I want an edition now (like Melville's Redburn, Moby Dick, White Jacket) or, if they have not published it then Random House's Everyman's editions. Both can be purchased from Barnes and Noble and both websites have hot links back to BN. I also like the supplemental info that these volumes provide so I'd rather wait for them when I order them than read online or print out pages or borrow it from the library. The books are themselves works of art in my opinion.

Like I said, this new format is great for being able to tackle big books. I love big books. But we could never have read Moby Dick or some of the other large volumes of great literature under the old format. I know they did a course, rather than a discussion, of Anna Karenina which was a wonderful novel. I am looking forward to someday reading War and Peace and now we can do it here but would never have been able to do it on BNU. BUT NOT IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS!

Denise




Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: to Bob community room

[ Edited ]

fanuzzir wrote:
Ziki, I'd love to hear more about Bush or Shakira or whomever strikes our fancy. I hope for some off topic discussion as well. Is anyone giving a copy of the Iraq Study Group report to anyone for Christmas?




No, for bob's sake...(=my new popular saying, blame Choisya for creating it) but I would like to get some UK recipes from Choisya 'bout the mincemeat pie and Christmas pudding that she'll be cooking for her 15 guests this week end (unless she cheats and buys it all already prepared). BTW the discussion on the great Joy cook book is moving very slowly but the moderators are lovely.

so...that just while I am waiting for a new copy of Moby Dick to arrive. Those in libraries were too dirty for my liking ;-) I won't read online, too strenuous for me eyes.

You're good sport, Bob :-)
So while I am constantly bitching about these groups the way they look right now there's no shadow falling over the moderators. Cheers for that tough gang!

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-13-200610:14 PM

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Re: Reading Business



fanuzzir wrote:
As I said, I set up some sections of discussion so we can all comment and learn about Melville's biography, whaling lore before the books actually arrive. Something like whetting appetites. But BN did want the board to go up before we have originally said and without anyone actually having the book! So apologies to you, and hope you can find something of interest here while you wait for your novel.




eh, we are tough skin pioneers clearing the way through the jungle....be happy there's a jungle left the way climate changes are going ;-) However, the Sinclair's Jungle I think I pass.

nuff
ziki
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bob's kitchen

[ Edited ]

fanuzzir wrote:
Ah, a fellow foodie. Do you know about the Italian tradition of seven courses of fish on Christmas eve? One for each sacrament of the Catholic Church. I'm not Catholic, and I'm not a glutton, so I don't cook seven courses, but it's great to plan a menu with such simple Italian antipasti and a great homeade clam sauce. I'm a big fan of Mario Batali cookbooks and Hazan's.
Bob




Oh ho, there is a place for you, Bob on the new &improved BNG forum! ;-)

It's called the Joy of cooking department.I just bought that book (my first one actually) and I love it. But you'd probably like the Silver Spoon. That's Joy of cooking of Italy.

ziki
Ok, I behave and get back to some whale meat here.:-)

Message Edited by ziki on 12-13-200610:35 PM

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christmas food



Laurel wrote:
And of course there's the beloved Norwegian lutefisk.




they have it in Sweden, too. But the fish is not made in the traditional way as it used to be. Nowadays it is industry, dries inside...

The success of that meal on teh table depends on the sauce you serve with it. Hey guys come over to the BNU cook book department!

ziki
Melissa_W
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Re: ? Choisya's dinner

That sounds lovely and more fun than my family's Christmas - eat big breakfast, have Grandpa open his presents, listen to my very materialistic cousin whine about what she got that was "nasty" (she's high-maintenence), nap/watch basketball/watch football/start making dinner (Turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce (mmmm), mashed potatoes (mmmm), several varieites of salads, etc) depending on one's desired activity level, eat dinner, listen to my relatives gossip. I think charades and things would be fun. This year tho, my 9-month-old twin nieces will be there to entertain everybody so I'm sure I'll be occupied with playtime :smileyhappy:



Choisya wrote:
I do a traditional roast beef and yorkshire pudding for Xmas lunch as folks don't have that as much nowadays - beef is very expensive. Followed by Xmas 'plum' pudding, served alight with brandy, with brandy sauce or custard. For tea I just do a selection of the usual cakes; stollen, panettone, mince pies etc., with salmon and cucumber sandwiches and cheeses, including stilton with port wine. We then open our presents and sing folk songs, accompanied by various instruments, play charades etc. The younger children will do a 'turn from their school plays. All very traditional, although we are not a traditional family in other ways.




ziki wrote:
So will you serve some "whale dish" having your dinner for 15? Or do you go by plum pudding to be certain? What menu did you choose?

ziki
the gourmet





Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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russians etc.

Sounds like when B&N gets the Shakespeare set up then next will be the European classics as Choisya already flagged for. Kafka would fall into that compartment...and of course all the Russians and also the French writers to start with.

War and Peace..yes, definitely...for me too.

Dostoyevskij, Tolstoj, Chechov those guys made a groove in the lit history...sure we want them in the cauldron,too.

ziki
there's hope
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: to Bob community room : Puddings & Pies

[ Edited ]
I second what ziki says about the Moderators here:smileyhappy:, especially Bob & Ilana.

I still use my grandmother's recipes from her old Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book (which is dropping to pieces!). She was a cook-housekeeper in a 'stately home' until she married my grandad. Mrs Beeton's recipes are online - I don't think readers here would appreciate my typing the lengthy gubbins here! Here is one for Christmas pudding, which is served lighted up with brandy. We draw the curtains to make the dining room dark and 'Mum' pours brandy over the pudding in the kitchen, and puts a match to it. It is brought into the dining room alight. It must have a couple of (washed) large silver coins in it too, for the children. We serve it, still alight into individual pudding dishes and brandy sauce is poured around it.


Mrs Beeton's Christmas pudding:
http://www.fashion-era.com/Christmas/christmas_food_beeton_pudding_recipe.htm#Mrs._Beetons_Tradition...

http://thefoody.com/mrsbsoups/brandysauce.html


Mrs Beeton's Mincemeat:
http://thefoody.com/mrsbpreserve/mincemeat.html

The Mincemeat (which is sweet, not made with meat!) is spooned into small, short pastry, tart cases, topped with pastry rounds, then pricked with a fork. Bake for 15 minutes until golden brown and sprinkle with sieved icing sugar when cool. Serve warm. (Adding 1 tablespoon of Birds custard powder to 1 lb of flour shortens the pastry and gives it a nice golden colour - tip from my grandmother!) Here is a photo of mince pies but without the sprinkling of icing sugar - which makes them look more festive:-

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wampyrii/319973779/





ziki wrote:

fanuzzir wrote:
Ziki, I'd love to hear more about Bush or Shakira or whomever strikes our fancy. I hope for some off topic discussion as well. Is anyone giving a copy of the Iraq Study Group report to anyone for Christmas?




No, for bob's sake...(=my new popular saying, blame Choisya for creating it) but I would like to get some UK recipes from Choisya 'bout the mincemeat pie and Christmas pudding that she'll be cooking for her 15 guests this week end (unless she cheats and buys it all already prepared). BTW the discussion on the great Joy cook book is moving very slowly but the moderators are lovely.

so...that just while I am waiting for a new copy of Moby Dick to arrive. Those in libraries were too dirty for my liking ;-) I won't read online, too strenuous for me eyes.

You're good sport, Bob :-)
So while I am constantly bitching about these groups the way they look right now there's no shadow falling over the moderators. Cheers for that tough gang!

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 12-13-200610:14 PM



Message Edited by Choisya on 12-13-200605:24 PM

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Choisya
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Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: christmas food



ziki wrote:
Hey guys come over to the BNU cook book department!

ziki





Hey, don't rain on Bob's parade!! :smileyhappy:
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Russians and the French etc.

I know you guys have been pouring French wine down the drain and shunning French Fries etc but there are some wonderful French novelists too:smileyhappy::smileyhappy: Zola would be an excellent start - perhaps Nana or Therese Raquin. He is the 'French Dickens'.





ziki wrote:
Sounds like when B&N gets the Shakespeare set up then next will be the European classics as Choisya already flagged for. Kafka would fall into that compartment...and of course all the Russians and also the French writers to start with.

War and Peace..yes, definitely...for me too.

Dostoyevskij, Tolstoj, Chechov those guys made a groove in the lit history...sure we want them in the cauldron,too.

ziki
there's hope


Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Whale Meat

Just to keep us on "topic" and show I am still doing "background" material, a bit on eating whale while we wait for people to get their books. I got curious about whale meat and how it tastes. It appears that it might be an acquired taste.

How it tastes:

"It tastes between beef meat and beef liver, but with the right amount of taste modifiers it is eatable."

http://theoldfoodie.blogspot.com/2006/11/whale-of-dinner.html

http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-MEATS/whale-meat-msg.html

Picture of whale meat and a Norwegian recipe:
http://www.highnorth.no/library/Culture/Recipes/no-wh-me.htm

The Whale Meat Revival:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/18/AR2005061800890.html


I have a feeling I am going to come out of reading Moby Dick knowing an LOT about whales!

Bucky
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Whale Meat

LOL Bucky - that goes for all of us! I remember that we had whale meat during WWII and that it was very tough but that probably depends on how skilled you are at cooking it. Horsemeat was better. The Japanese use it for some sushi as whalemeat forms a big part of their diet, despite all the bans:smileysad::smileysad:




leakybucket wrote:
Just to keep us on "topic" and show I am still doing "background" material, a bit on eating whale while we wait for people to get their books. I got curious about whale meat and how it tastes. It appears that it might be an acquired taste.

How it tastes:

"It tastes between beef meat and beef liver, but with the right amount of taste modifiers it is eatable."

http://theoldfoodie.blogspot.com/2006/11/whale-of-dinner.html

http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-MEATS/whale-meat-msg.html

Picture of whale meat and a Norwegian recipe:
http://www.highnorth.no/library/Culture/Recipes/no-wh-me.htm

The Whale Meat Revival:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/18/AR2005061800890.html


I have a feeling I am going to come out of reading Moby Dick knowing an LOT about whales!

Bucky


Frequent Contributor
ELee
Posts: 418
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: to Bob community room : Puddings & Pies

"I still use my grandmother's recipes from her old Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book (which is dropping to pieces!)."

Choisya,
Is that the same Mrs. Beeton that wrote the "Book of Household Management"? "The Household General"?
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