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We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Product placement


fanuzzir wrote:
Great having a Community Room again so that we don't clutter up the discussion area with trivia. It would be nice if it were on the bottom of the headers but, hey, we can't have everything! Maybe our moderator can move it.

Leaky, do you meant below the magical line of selected threads at the top? I thought it would be convenient to have the heavily trafficked areas all together so that no one would have to search for anything to get involved.
Bob




Bob, I haven't the foggiest idea of what you are referring to! Could you please quote or copy part of the message you are responding to?

Buck
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
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Re: A question for Americans

Do folks here know the phrase 'suck it and see'? I have just had a post containing this common (English) idiom removed from a board and was surprised to find that someone found the expression offensive. It only means trying something to see if you like it and is thought to originate from a large old-fashioned sweet called a gobstopper which changes colour as you sucked on it.
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Choisya
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Re: COMMUNITY ROOM for Moby Dick : A song for the Festive Season

[ Edited ]
Wishing all my B&N friends a very Happy and Festive Season! I think this seasonal song may amuse you (hope you can pick it up - click on the top track to play):-

http://music.allofmp3.com/r2/Kenny_Chesney/All_I_Want_For_Christmas_Is_A_Real_Good_Tan/group_1192/al...

Message Edited by Choisya on 12-20-200607:01 AM

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Choisya
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Re: COMMUNITY ROOM for Moby Dick : A completely off topic observation.

I bought all my children books for Xmas and one of them was 'My Sister My Friend', which I bought for one of my daughters on a recommendation posted on B&N. However, it caused great hilarity because of the OTT compliments readers were advised to give their sisters. My daughters took turns to read sentences out to the family and before long we were doubled up with laughter. Are Americans really as effusive as this and if so when did you get to be that way because it does not show up in earlier literature? One sentence that really tickled my elder daughter was: 'I am proud of the woman you have become, Munchkin' !!! Her younger sister has recently embarked on a teaching degree course, at the age of 45 and whilst bringing up two young children so she really is proud of her (we all are) but she could not say this sentence without bursting into laughter and they both ended up in hysterics! Brits wouldn't say such things to their boy friends/hubbies, let alone their sisters. BTW, this isn't a criticism, just an observation. I have commented on B&N before about the compliments you all pay one another as a matter of course. Even 'Have a Nice Day' from a shop assistant causes hilarity over here. We really are two nations separated by a common language (as my previous post about sucking eggs also shows):smileyhappy:
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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: COMMUNITY ROOM for Moby Dick : A completely off topic observation.

The only place you'll find such sentences in my part of America is in silly books and magazines, and perhaps on television, though I wouldn't know about that.



Choisya wrote:
I bought all my children books for Xmas and one of them was 'My Sister My Friend', which I bought for one of my daughters on a recommendation posted on B&N. However, it caused great hilarity because of the OTT compliments readers were advised to give their sisters. My daughters took turns to read sentences out to the family and before long we were doubled up with laughter. Are Americans really as effusive as this and if so when did you get to be that way because it does not show up in earlier literature? One sentence that really tickled my elder daughter was: 'I am proud of the woman you have become, Munchkin' !!! Her younger sister has recently embarked on a teaching degree course, at the age of 45 and whilst bringing up two young children so she really is proud of her (we all are) but she could not say this sentence without bursting into laughter and they both ended up in hysterics! Brits wouldn't say such things to their boy friends/hubbies, let alone their sisters. BTW, this isn't a criticism, just an observation. I have commented on B&N before about the compliments you all pay one another as a matter of course. Even 'Have a Nice Day' from a shop assistant causes hilarity over here. We really are two nations separated by a common language (as my previous post about sucking eggs also shows):smileyhappy:


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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HAVE A BEAUTIFUL AND JOYOUS HOLIDAY SEASON!

[ Edited ]

Choisya wrote:
Do folks here know the phrase 'suck it and see'? I have just had a post containing this common (English) idiom removed from a board and was surprised to find that someone found the expression offensive. It only means trying something to see if you like it and is thought to originate from a large old-fashioned sweet called a gobstopper which changes colour as you sucked on it.


Hi,Choisya! I was just out and about, randomly thumbing through books and posts, and thought I'd drop into your Com.Rm. for a spot of tea! :-) Your questions to Americans are interesting! This particular phrase, or idiom, 'suck it and see' is not one that I'm familiar with. We do use similar phrasing, but it's not used with kindness, or by the 'genteel' population lol.....(possibly because of it's sexual reference) Kids, and adults alike, use slang, or say derogatory remarks for put downs....to one another....So, that also may be why it was removed.

To be kind to one another, when we speak or in our actions - whether to strangers, or to our own family members, is just how we're taught to be. I can't imagine not saying, 'have a nice day', or 'be well', or 'be happy', or 'take care', or any number of good feeling phrases. I'm not saying everyone does this, but once you start saying these "well wishing phrases", it really does cause good feelings between people, don't you think?

Now, Choisya, I send you nothing but love from across the vast Atlantic ocean, and the US, from 'sunny' Southern California! And I hope this holiday season is the beginning for you and yours, of every 'kind' phrase we can say to one another!
Merry Christmas!

Message Edited by KathyS on 12-22-200607:29 AM

Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: While we wait



fanuzzir wrote:
I was thinking that if I could get a bunch of those cheap bookshelves made of pressboard, I could line them along the walls of my poorly insulated house and then put all my books in them and save on my heating bill!


Then you must be happy to be reading Moby Dick. There's lots of insulation there!


Especially since my volume includes Redburn and White Jacket!

Choisya, I'll try to remember to quote the original post but I don't always remember.

Denise
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: HAVE A BEAUTIFUL AND JOYOUS HOLIDAY SEASON!

Thanks a lot for your explanation and good wishes KathyS which of course are fully reciprocated. I hope you enjoyed your cup of tea here and that you will drop in again.:smileyhappy:

The phrase I used has no ulterior or sexual meaning over here so once again we are separated by our common language:smileyhappy: On the question of being kind to one another, we are taught to be kind but do not use effusive phrases. They are thought to be insincere if we use them for every 'time dick or harry' so we reserve them for those we really love. Again it is a cultural difference between our two nations. The French and Italians are more effusive than the English and Germans. Perhaps there is a lot of Latin blood in Americans?:smileyhappy::smileyhappy:




KathyS wrote:

Choisya wrote:
Do folks here know the phrase 'suck it and see'? I have just had a post containing this common (English) idiom removed from a board and was surprised to find that someone found the expression offensive. It only means trying something to see if you like it and is thought to originate from a large old-fashioned sweet called a gobstopper which changes colour as you sucked on it.


Hi,Choisya! I was just out and about, randomly thumbing through books and posts, and thought I'd drop into your Com.Rm. for a spot of tea! :-) Your questions to Americans are interesting! This particular phrase, or idiom, 'suck it and see' is not one that I'm familiar with. We do use similar phrasing, but it's not used with kindness, or by the 'genteel' population lol.....(possibly because of it's sexual reference) Kids, and adults alike, use slang, or say derogatory remarks for put downs....to one another....So, that also may be why it was removed.

To be kind to one another, when we speak or in our actions - whether to strangers, or to our own family members, is just how we're taught to be. I can't imagine not saying, 'have a nice day', or 'be well', or 'be happy', or 'take care', or any number of good feeling phrases. I'm not saying everyone does this, but once you start saying these "well wishing phrases", it really does cause good feelings between people, don't you think?

Now, Choisya, I send you nothing but love from across the vast Atlantic ocean, and the US, from 'sunny' Southern California! And I hope this holiday season is the beginning for you and yours, of every 'kind' phrase we can say to one another!
Merry Christmas!

Message Edited by KathyS on 12-22-200607:29 AM




Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: Bob silver spoon- off topic

The book is huge, bigger than my EOD and nothing to travel with. I dropped the package three times on my way home from the post office(glad to report the book survived unharmed).

Many recipes are inspiring and I will use them, others are too special for me (mostly game-quail, wild board and such animals that I never met).

The book has pics in color, I like the layout. It is easy to navigate (different colors are used) and well worth the money, methinks.
The first thing I will try= the brussel sprouts with almonds.

happy eating, happy reading

ziki
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Bob silver spoon- off topic

Poor little quails - give them a chance to grow up!:smileytongue:




ziki wrote:
The book is huge, bigger than my EOD and nothing to travel with. I dropped the package three times on my way home from the post office(glad to report the book survived unharmed).

Many recipes are inspiring and I will use them, others are too special for me (mostly game-quail, wild board and such animals that I never met).

The book has pics in color, I like the layout. It is easy to navigate (different colors are used) and well worth the money, methinks.
The first thing I will try= the brussel sprouts with almonds.

happy eating, happy reading

ziki


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: A question for Americans..no for moderators



Choisya wrote:
Do folks here know the phrase 'suck it and see'? I have just had a post containing this common (English) idiom removed from a board and was surprised to find that someone found the expression offensive. It only means trying something to see if you like it and is thought to originate from a large old-fashioned sweet called a gobstopper which changes colour as you sucked on it.




Help!I don't believe it! It is in my dictionary of idioms.

Maybe BNC initiates a course on idioms for moderators, heheh!
Can you still find those sweets nowadays?

Choisya, it's great you post this and help BNC to draw the line correctly.You're not out of line but you put your neck on the line. I hope you stay in the front line and I do enjoy you being on line so frequently.

ziki :-)
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Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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English politeness

>KathyS wrote: This particular phrase, or idiom, 'suck it and see' is not one that I'm familiar with. We do use similar phrasing, but it's not used with kindness, or by the 'genteel' population lol.....(possibly because of it's sexual reference)

OTH when you say 'it sucks' it just means it is not good...


Kathy : To be kind to one another, when we speak or in our actions - whether to strangers, or to our own family members, is just how we're taught to be. I can't imagine not saying, 'have a nice day', or 'be well', or 'be happy', or 'take care', or any number of good feeling phrases. I'm not saying everyone does this, but once you start saying these "well wishing phrases", it really does cause good feelings between people, don't you think?

---
It does but it helps if it is also trully meant. If it becomes just an empty phrase it doesn't engage your heart. However, I'd say.... it's still better than having a stranger screaming insults at you. That's not good for your heart rate.

You can't mean Brits are not polite. They are even more polite than Americans but in a different way. It also feels like they mean it.

kind regards,
ziki
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: A question for Americans..no for moderators

Thanks ziki - that's a lot of lines:smileyhappy: Yes those sweets (candies?) are still sold, usually under the slightly more polite name of humbugs. They are large, striped and mint-flavoured although I seem to remember that one of their delights was that as you sucked, the flavours and colours also changed - hence the name.

http://www.mrsbrowns.co.uk/acatalog/MINT_HUMBUGS.html



ziki wrote:


Choisya wrote:
Do folks here know the phrase 'suck it and see'? I have just had a post containing this common (English) idiom removed from a board and was surprised to find that someone found the expression offensive. It only means trying something to see if you like it and is thought to originate from a large old-fashioned sweet called a gobstopper which changes colour as you sucked on it.




Help!I don't believe it! It is in my dictionary of idioms.

Maybe BNC initiates a course on idioms for moderators, heheh!
Can you still find those sweets nowadays?

Choisya, it's great you post this and help BNC to draw the line correctly.You're not out of line but you put your neck on the line. I hope you stay in the front line and I do enjoy you being on line so frequently.

ziki :-)


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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An observation



Choisya wrote:
I bought all my children books for Xmas and one of them was 'My Sister My Friend', which I bought for one of my daughters on a recommendation posted on B&N. However, it caused great hilarity because of the OTT compliments readers were advised to give their sisters. My daughters took turns to read sentences out to the family and before long we were doubled up with laughter. Are Americans really as effusive as this and if so when did you get to be that way because it does not show up in earlier literature? One sentence that really tickled my elder daughter was: 'I am proud of the woman you have become, Munchkin' !!! Her younger sister has recently embarked on a teaching degree course, at the age of 45 and whilst bringing up two young children so she really is proud of her (we all are) but she could not say this sentence without bursting into laughter and they both ended up in hysterics! Brits wouldn't say such things to their boy friends/hubbies, let alone their sisters. BTW, this isn't a criticism, just an observation. I have commented on B&N before about the compliments you all pay one another as a matter of course. Even 'Have a Nice Day' from a shop assistant causes hilarity over here. We really are two nations separated by a common language (as my previous post about sucking eggs also shows):smileyhappy:


Dear Munchkin,
any more of these hillarious phrases to share with us?
z.
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: For Ziki, my lambkin

My daughter still has the book Ziki, my little lambkin, but I am seeing both my daughters on Xmas Day and will try to cull some more choice phrases from them - I am sure they will again read the book with glee!



ziki wrote:


Choisya wrote:
I bought all my children books for Xmas and one of them was 'My Sister My Friend', which I bought for one of my daughters on a recommendation posted on B&N. However, it caused great hilarity because of the OTT compliments readers were advised to give their sisters. My daughters took turns to read sentences out to the family and before long we were doubled up with laughter. Are Americans really as effusive as this and if so when did you get to be that way because it does not show up in earlier literature? One sentence that really tickled my elder daughter was: 'I am proud of the woman you have become, Munchkin' !!! Her younger sister has recently embarked on a teaching degree course, at the age of 45 and whilst bringing up two young children so she really is proud of her (we all are) but she could not say this sentence without bursting into laughter and they both ended up in hysterics! Brits wouldn't say such things to their boy friends/hubbies, let alone their sisters. BTW, this isn't a criticism, just an observation. I have commented on B&N before about the compliments you all pay one another as a matter of course. Even 'Have a Nice Day' from a shop assistant causes hilarity over here. We really are two nations separated by a common language (as my previous post about sucking eggs also shows):smileyhappy:


Dear Munchkin,
any more of these hillarious phrases to share with us?
z.


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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quoting posts-threaded view to Choisya



Choisya wrote:
Fanuzzir: Could you please always quote the post you are replying to - it gets a mite confusing when other posts have 'intervened'. Ta.





Choisya,
Bob was replying to your own post:
"Melville himself was very political and intentially drew attention by allegory etc to political matters so I don't think the book is 'above' politics. Indeed it was the political content which first made it popular."

You might like to switch to the threaded view when you get confused because there you can see it easily (like on the old BNU).

Changing linear mode to threaded and back is very easy, you do it on the options and it takes immdiate effect. It is like looking into a dictionary...a side task.

When I read the_ linear_ mode_only it looked like this forum was for people from an asylum.I actually had a great laugh when I scrolled down... the impression was absolutely insane.

If saw only that I would never join the forum.
The linear view gives the forum a bad rap.

ziki
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Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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ok sweetie

LOL, this really strengthens the sisterly bond and also my abdominal muscles...ROFL, I can see why you guys had fun.
Maybe next time you see your daugters they will have incorporated a couple of phrases knowing them by heart....

ziki :-)
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all kind of sweets from UK

Great site, you're a cyber wizard..imagine they had Parma violets. I wonder if they have a shape of violets, too. I bookmarked the site. Fortunately I have no sweet tooth otherwise I'd be ruined.

ziki :-)
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: quoting posts-threaded view to Choisya

I find the linear mode better ziki and can't be bothered to switch between one and the other. I think it is better to Quote Posts in any case, just as we used to do in BNU.



ziki wrote:


Choisya wrote:
Fanuzzir: Could you please always quote the post you are replying to - it gets a mite confusing when other posts have 'intervened'. Ta.





Choisya,
Bob was replying to your own post:
"Melville himself was very political and intentially drew attention by allegory etc to political matters so I don't think the book is 'above' politics. Indeed it was the political content which first made it popular."

You might like to switch to the threaded view when you get confused because there you can see it easily (like on the old BNU).

Changing linear mode to threaded and back is very easy, you do it on the options and it takes immdiate effect. It is like looking into a dictionary...a side task.

When I read the_ linear_ mode_only it looked like this forum was for people from an asylum.I actually had a great laugh when I scrolled down... the impression was absolutely insane.

If saw only that I would never join the forum.
The linear view gives the forum a bad rap.

ziki



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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: all kind of sweets from UK

Ah Palma Violets - I used to suck those before I went out with a boy friend.....(You are surely too young, dear little lambkin, to remember those???) This site has them but alas! not in the old-fashioned shape of violets:-

http://www.bagofsweets.com/zcart.search.php?Search=palma+violets




ziki wrote:
Great site, you're a cyber wizard..imagine they had Parma violets. I wonder if they have a shape of violets, too. I bookmarked the site. Fortunately I have no sweet tooth otherwise I'd be ruined.

ziki :-)


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