Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: cook book- off topic

I took a cake class at the Culinary School of the Rockies and the chef said that Joy of Cooking (and we use the high altitude section here) was good because it had a high rate of continuous success with its recipes.

Denise
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: cook book- off topic



donyskiw wrote:
I took a cake class at the Culinary School of the Rockies and the chef said that Joy of Cooking (and we use the high altitude section here) was good because it had a high rate of continuous success with its recipes.

Denise




Denise, the toughest food critics at the New York Times applauded the reissue of that book, so it must have alot going for it. I pass up the cookbooks generally for Food and Wine, a good sampling of Italian/French/California continental cuisine. By the way, I could retire to northern California and enjoy every meal for the rest of my life.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

24 h marathon

How on earth do they read this in 24 hours? 24 months sounds more probable.
---
But I agree with the observation that this book is written more as we speak rather than 'a book as a book' and therefore to listen to it might be easier and even more natural.

ziki
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

miscellaneous links

[ Edited ]
tpm
Contributor
tpm
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎12-28-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Queequeg

I hesitate to make this my first post, since it's rather silly, but I've got to ask. How does one pronounce Queequeg? I've been calling him "qwee-qweg", but then I thought that sounds a bit odd, so maybe it's "kee-keg" or "qwee-keg". Anyway, I'd hate to read the whole book and mispronounce his name the whole way through.

Todd
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: miscellaneous links

Thanks Ziki - interesting links. Isn't it sad that Melville was so neglected in his own day and yet has spawned a veritable industry around MD? 'A prophet without honour...'




ziki wrote:
http://www.nps.gov/archive/nebe/planning/interpthemes.htm

melville

http://www.serve.com/Lucius/Melville.index.html

Message Edited by ziki on 01-03-200706:26 AM




Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Queequeg

Hi tpm - welcome aboard! I've been pronouncing him 'kweekeg' in my head too but do not know whether that is right or not. Fanuzzir will put us right:smileyhappy:




tpm wrote:
I hesitate to make this my first post, since it's rather silly, but I've got to ask. How does one pronounce Queequeg? I've been calling him "qwee-qweg", but then I thought that sounds a bit odd, so maybe it's "kee-keg" or "qwee-keg". Anyway, I'd hate to read the whole book and mispronounce his name the whole way through.

Todd


Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 24 h marathon

Yes, I think I would quite like to listen to a CD by a good narrator. Who do folks think would make a good American narrator and are there any MD CDs you can suggest for this Brit?




ziki wrote:
How on earth do they read this in 24 hours? 24 months sounds more probable.
---
But I agree with the observation that this book is written more as we speak rather than 'a book as a book' and therefore to listen to it might be easier and even more natural.

ziki


Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: cook book- off topic

I could do the same, too, but I think I'd have to marry someone who can meet or beat my pension!

Denise
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: miscellaneous links

Good links, ziki! I like "Rusty's" comments from the third link:

"Moby-Dick, a novel?! Is y'r Homer a novelist? Is y'r Book o' Job a novel? Y'r novel's a piddlin', dainty form. When y' c'n stuff a whale in a ten-gallon bucket -- that's when y'r Moby-Dick'll be a novel!!" -- Rufus ("Rusty") Frye, Boatswain's mate, U.S.S. Liberty



ziki wrote:
http://www.nps.gov/archive/nebe/planning/interpthemes.htm

melville

http://www.serve.com/Lucius/Melville.index.html

Message Edited by ziki on 01-03-200706:26 AM




"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Queequeg


tpm wrote:
I hesitate to make this my first post, since it's rather silly, but I've got to ask. How does one pronounce Queequeg? I've been calling him "qwee-qweg", but then I thought that sounds a bit odd, so maybe it's "kee-keg" or "qwee-keg". Anyway, I'd hate to read the whole book and mispronounce his name the whole way through.

Todd




He's "qwee-qweg" to me, Todd. That's how it's pronounced on the CD's and films. Unless you want to call him Hedgehog!
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

joy of cooking- off topic



donyskiw wrote:
I took a cake class at the Culinary School of the Rockies and the chef said that Joy of Cooking (and we use the high altitude section here) was good because it had a high rate of continuous success with its recipes.

Denise


Maggie Green would be glad to hear that. So far the book is reliable IMHO.
ziki
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Queequeg

Hi Todd, welcome. Not a silly post at all. I simply settled on "kwee-kweg".
It's good to verify that here.

ziki
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Queequeg

[ Edited ]
Thanks for your confidence everyone. I'm quoting two professors from my college days: "Kweekweg."

Message Edited by fanuzzir on 01-03-200709:58 PM

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Keisha Castle-Hughes in THE NATIVITY STORY

If you enjoyed Whale Rider, you may also enjoy Keisha Castle-Hughes's performance as Mary in Catherine Hardwicke's The Nativity Story. I think it's the love story of Mary and Joseph, played by Oscar Isaac, whose performance is moving and impressive. I also loved all the animals! Viewers of all persuasions will enjoy this very well-made film.

http://www.thenativitystory.com


pmath wrote (message linked here):
Thanks, ELee: have you seen the film Whale Rider? I loved it

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=043396022720

ELee wrote:
My “Norton” states that according to Geoffrey Sanborn’s manuscript “Whence Come You, Queequeg?”, an account from George L. Craik’s “The New Zealanders” (1830) Chapter XIV details experiences of the Maori chief Tupai Cupa (Te Pehi Kupe), whose physical appearance and adventures inspired the character of Queequeg.

Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: joy of cooking- off topic

Who is Maggie Green?

Denise
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Keisha Castle-Hughes in THE NATIVITY STORY

I watched the DVD of the Whale Rider over Xmas pmath and was disappointed with it. I thought it was very slow moving and lacked a clear story line. I should receive Greg Peck's Moby Dick tomorrow so will now watch that - except for the whaling bits:smileysad:




pmath wrote:
If you enjoyed Whale Rider, you may also enjoy Keisha Castle-Hughes's performance as Mary in Catherine Hardwicke's The Nativity Story. I think it's the love story of Mary and Joseph, played by Oscar Isaac, whose performance is moving and impressive. I also loved all the animals! Viewers of all persuasions will enjoy this very well-made film.

http://www.thenativitystory.com


pmath wrote (message linked here):
Thanks, ELee: have you seen the film Whale Rider? I loved it

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=043396022720

ELee wrote:
My “Norton” states that according to Geoffrey Sanborn’s manuscript “Whence Come You, Queequeg?”, an account from George L. Craik’s “The New Zealanders” (1830) Chapter XIV details experiences of the Maori chief Tupai Cupa (Te Pehi Kupe), whose physical appearance and adventures inspired the character of Queequeg.




Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

WHALE RIDER and THE NATIVITY STORY

Then you might also find The Nativity Story slow-moving! I loved it, especially Joseph, who we don't usually think of as a hero.


Choisya wrote:
I watched the DVD of the Whale Rider over Xmas pmath and was disappointed with it. I thought it was very slow moving and lacked a clear story line.

pmath wrote:
If you enjoyed Whale Rider, you may also enjoy Keisha Castle-Hughes's performance as Mary in Catherine Hardwicke's The Nativity Story. I think it's the love story of Mary and Joseph, played by Oscar Isaac, whose performance is moving and impressive. I also loved all the animals! Viewers of all persuasions will enjoy this very well-made film.

http://www.thenativitystory.com

pmath wrote (message linked here):
Thanks, ELee: have you seen the film Whale Rider? I loved it

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=043396022720

ELee wrote:
My “Norton” states that according to Geoffrey Sanborn’s manuscript “Whence Come You, Queequeg?”, an account from George L. Craik’s “The New Zealanders” (1830) Chapter XIV details experiences of the Maori chief Tupai Cupa (Te Pehi Kupe), whose physical appearance and adventures inspired the character of Queequeg.



Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Riding Whales



Choisya wrote:
I watched the DVD of the Whale Rider over Xmas pmath and was disappointed with it. I thought it was very slow moving and lacked a clear story line. I should receive Greg Peck's Moby Dick tomorrow so will now watch that - except for the whaling bits:smileysad:






I watched Whale rider, too, but I don't remember much about it. I also watched Gregory again. Such a handsome Ahab! It goes heavily with the actio (e.g. whale-killing) but is very good. I'm waiting for the Patrick Stewart to come back from the library so I can watch it yet again. It's longer and spends more time with the narrative, which I like, and Gregory Peck gets to be Father Mapple. The DVD the library has includes quite a bit of fascinating documentary material. The Stewart Queequeg is a real South-Sea Islander.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: joy of cooking- off topic



donyskiw wrote:
Who is Maggie Green?

Denise



She was one who worked with this edition and presented it here on B&N.

ziki
Users Online
Currently online: 37 members 526 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: