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LitEditor
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More Melville

Book Cover Image: Title: TTypee: A Peep at Polynesian Life, Author: Herman Melville

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Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life
This romanticized novelization of Melville's adventures in French Polynesia made him a famous writer -- and made an exotic spectacle of islander life, which entered the American cultural lexicon forever. Read Typee and discover the origin of many a modern fantasy of Eden regained.


Book Cover Image: Title: The Invisible Man, Author: H. G. Wells

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Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas
Following the commercial and critical success of Typee, Herman Melville continued his series of South Sea adventure-romances with this novel. Named after the Polynesian term for a rover, or someone who roams from island to island, Omoo chronicles the tumultuous events aboard a South Sea whaling vessel and is based on Melville's personal experiences as a crew member on a ship sailing the Pacific. From recruiting among the natives for sailors to handling deserters and even mutiny, Melville gives a first-person account of life as a sailor during the nineteenth century filled with colorful characters and vivid descriptions of the far-flung locales of Polynesia.


Book Cover Image: Title: Redburn, Author: Herman Melville

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Redburn
Redburn charts the coming-of-age of Wellingborough Redburn, a young innocent who embarks on a crossing to Liverpool together with a roguish crew. Once in Liverpool, Redburn encounters the squalid conditions of the city and meets Harry Bolton, a bereft and damaged soul, who takes him on a tour of London that includes a scene of rococo decadence unlike anything else in Melville's fiction.


Book Cover Image: Title: Pierre; or, the Ambiguities, Author: Herman Melville

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Pierre, or, the Ambiguities
Reviewers of the 1850s were scathing about this unconventional novel, calling it "a dead failure," "this crazy rigmarole," and "a literary mare's nest." Latter-day critics have recognized in the story of Melville's idealistic young hero a corrosive satire of the sentimental-Gothic novel, and a revolutionary foray into modernist literary techniques. As William Spengemann writes in his introduction to this edition, "For anyone who, being aware of the culture of modernity, is curious about its origins, Pierre ranks with Coleridge's 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner,' Carlyle's Sartor Resartus, Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, and the poems of Emily Dickinson as one of the privileged places where the dead past can be seen giving way inexorably to the living present."


Book Cover Image: Title: The Confidence-Man, Author: Herman Melville

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The Confidence-Man
Considered by some Melville's strangest novel, The Confidence-Man is a comic allegory aimed at the optimism and materialism of mid-nineteenth century America. A shape-shifting Confidence-Man approaches passengers on a Mississippi River steamboat and, winning over his not-quite-innocent victims with his charms, urges each to trust in the cosmos, in nature, and even in human nature--with predictable results. In Melville's time the book was such a failure he abandoned fiction writing for twenty years; only in the twentieth century did critics celebrate its technical virtuosity, wit, comprehensive social vision, and wry skepticism.


Book Cover Image: Title: Billy Budd and The Piazza Tales, Author: Herman Melville

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Billy Budd and The Piazza Tales
Melville mastered not only the novel but also the short story and novella. Published posthumously in 1924, Billy Budd is a masterpiece many critics consider second only to Moby-Dick. This complex short novel tells the story of "the handsome sailor" Billy who, provoked by a false charge, accidentally kills the satanic master-at-arms. Unable to defend himself due to a stammer, he is hanged, going willingly to his fate. Although typically ambiguous, Billy Budd can be seen as a testament to Melville's ultimate reconciliation with the incongruities and injustices of life. The Piazza Tales (1856) comprises six short stories, including the perpetually popular "Benito Cereno" and "Bartleby," a tale of a scrivener who repeatedly distills his mordant criticism of the workplace into the deceptively simple phrase "I would prefer not to."


Discover all titles and editions from Herman Melville.

See the latest news about book clubs in the Book Clubs Blog.
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leakybucket
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Moby Dick - The Movie

I know how I'm going to fill in some of my backgrounder time. I just ordered the Gregory Peck movie and I'm really looking forward to it.

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=027616862945&itm=1

Anyone one else watching this?
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Laurel
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Re: Moby Dick - The Movie

Yes! Over and over. And the more recent one, with Patrick Stewart, is even better. You'll have to get the Stewart one from a secondary source, though. In it, a seasoned Gregory Peck plays Father Mapple. There is also a one-man-show reading that I have that is superb. The performer is named Jack Aranson.



leakybucket wrote:
I know how I'm going to fill in some of my backgrounder time. I just ordered the Gregory Peck movie and I'm really looking forward to it.

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=027616862945&itm=1

Anyone one else watching this?


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Moby Dick - The Movie

Is the Stewart Moby Dick the Hallmark Hall of Fame 1998 one? It looks like my library has it but they are not too specific on details.

I was also looking at some audio. I would prefer the unabridged but they are a bit out of my budget even with my extra 15% off Holiday Sticker. There are several abridged. Have you heard any of them?

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?FMT=AU&WRD=moby+dick&z=y&cds2Pid=9481

My library had an audio but it is missing.

Bucky



Laurel wrote:
Yes! Over and over. And the more recent one, with Patrick Stewart, is even better. You'll have to get the Stewart one from a secondary source, though. In it, a seasoned Gregory Peck plays Father Mapple. There is also a one-man-show reading that I have that is superb. The performer is named Jack Aranson.



leakybucket wrote:
I know how I'm going to fill in some of my backgrounder time. I just ordered the Gregory Peck movie and I'm really looking forward to it.

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=027616862945&itm=1

Anyone one else watching this?





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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Moby Dick - The Movie

Yes, I think Hallmark brought it to TV in this country. It's not a Hallmark production though. I have tried several times to listen to MD unabridged on CD, but it doesn't work for me. Abridged works better. Charleton Heston is excellent with it.



leakybucket wrote:
Is the Stewart Moby Dick the Hallmark Hall of Fame 1998 one? It looks like my library has it but they are not too specific on details.

I was also looking at some audio. I would prefer the unabridged but they are a bit out of my budget even with my extra 15% off Holiday Sticker. There are several abridged. Have you heard any of them?

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?FMT=AU&WRD=moby+dick&z=y&cds2Pid=9481

My library had an audio but it is missing.

Bucky



Laurel wrote:
Yes! Over and over. And the more recent one, with Patrick Stewart, is even better. You'll have to get the Stewart one from a secondary source, though. In it, a seasoned Gregory Peck plays Father Mapple. There is also a one-man-show reading that I have that is superb. The performer is named Jack Aranson.



leakybucket wrote:
I know how I'm going to fill in some of my backgrounder time. I just ordered the Gregory Peck movie and I'm really looking forward to it.

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=027616862945&itm=1

Anyone one else watching this?








"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Moby Dick - The Movie

I watched the video last night of the Gregory Peck's Moby Dick and it was excellent. Though I have only read the first few pages of the book, it appears to be very true to the book. Excellent cast all around.

Actually, while you are waiting for the start of our reading discussion, you might want to watch this. It provided me with a good overview of the story and some of the issues that I'm sure Melville goes into in a great deal more detail. This story works on many levels. The video preview was enough to indicate that we are going to have some fascinating points of discussion here.

And what a whale! You don't want to mess with Moby Dick! He gets real angry when you stick little harpoons in him. The idea of hunting whales bothered me but if more whales were like Moby Dick they wouldn't have much to fear--the prey suddenly became the predator. Excellent special effects for an older movie. Highly recommended. I haven't gotten the Stewart Moby Dick video yet and can't imagine how it could be better.

I probably will watch the video again after I've read more of the book and have more to say on it.

Bucky



leakybucket wrote:
I know how I'm going to fill in some of my backgrounder time. I just ordered the Gregory Peck movie and I'm really looking forward to it.

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=027616862945&itm=1

Anyone one else watching this?

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