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Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Technique/writing

OK, I just wanted to start this thread and I wonder if we could perhaps examine even the formal side of the epos....you know things like metahaphors, rhythm, style, repetition, foreshadowing, structure etc.

I have a vague memory that Bob said he learned a lot from this book about writing.....or was I just dreaming it? Nothign is certain. So I thought we could possibly explore the writing technique, too.

Any good questions, pointers for us Bob?


ziki
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Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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narrator

[ Edited ]
What an incredible soaring interest for this thread, LOL!

Anyhows:


I read Madox Ford and there is a passage that goes like this (Part One/chII):

"I don't know how it is best to put this thing down-whether it would be better to try and tell the story from the beginning, as if it were a story; or whether to tell it from this distance of time as it reached me from the lips of...." [others]


This made me think about the voice of Ishmael. In the first part of MD that was so hillarious at times--there Melville told the story "from the beginning" with Ishmael also acting in it...but then as we already said he move to the observations that were presented not from the beginning but from the end so to speak.

These two lines didn't meet until after the end of the book. Perhaps Ishmael lost his innocence on the whaler and became a depersonalized observer of horror and fact. Neither did he return to that original voice any time later and that chimes with my idea that it was lost.

I am not sure if I am trying to reinvent the wheel here or flogg a dead horse but Moby simply lingers in my consciousness.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 02-07-200708:20 AM

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