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krenea1
Posts: 356
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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European History

I'm fond of Europen history. I love reading about the royal history but would also like to find more books on regular people of that time. I actually enjoy reading a fictional novel based on real people or just find a good story based in the "old" days. Any suggestions?
Karen Renea

Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back
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swobe
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History



krenea1 wrote:
I'm fond of Europen history. I love reading about the royal history but would also like to find more books on regular people of that time. I actually enjoy reading a fictional novel based on real people or just find a good story based in the "old" days. Any suggestions?




I'm not really sure what time period you are most interested in but the Patrick O'Brian Aubrey/Maturin series is an outstanding depiction of life in the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic era.
Far and Sure
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krenea1
Posts: 356
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History

Thanks for the suggestion. I will have to check it out.
Karen Renea

Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back
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Skyler97
Posts: 38
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History

Another good series is Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cycle, "Quicksilver", "The Confusion", and "The System of the World". The story follows the adventures of Daniel Waterhouse(scientist and freind of Isaac Newton), Jack Shaftoe(Adventurer, Highwayman, Pirate, Vagabond), and Eliza (Harem Girl, Mathematician, Coutesan, Spy) as they move about the World in the late 17th and early 18th Century meeting many historical figures along the way.
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lynnne
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History



krenea1 wrote:
I'm fond of Europen history. I love reading about the royal history but would also like to find more books on regular people of that time. I actually enjoy reading a fictional novel based on real people or just find a good story based in the "old" days. Any suggestions?




I enjoyed the Philippa Greogory books.
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Doria
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History

I like New York City history. I like both fiction and non-fiction. In fact, I am really sort of studying it. I am amazed that I was born and raised in New York, and lived there for over 50 years and knew so little about the city's history.
I don't have a particular favorite author yet. Any suggestions?
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Macariojames
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History

Hey Dora,

My favorite topic of history is that of African American history -- Pan Africanism, Black Liberation struggle in America, jazz and blues to more contemporary hip-hop, amongst others.

In regards to your interest in New York history, a great book that delves deeply into an untold portion of NYC history is "Root&Branch: African Americans in New York and East Jersey, 1613-1863" (isbn:080784778X).
student of life: it's past, the present, the future
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Macariojames
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History

Oops... I meant "Doria" not "Dora" :-( sorry about that.
student of life: it's past, the present, the future
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BookJunkie
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: European History

Hi Doria
Have you read Forever by Pete Hamill? (isbn: 0316735698). It's been on my to read list ever since it came out. It's about a guy who arrives in NYC in the 1700s and is granted immortality on one condition ... he can never leave the island of Manhattan. If anyone has read this book, let me know how you liked it!
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Doria
Posts: 10
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Re: European History

Hi Bookjunkie-
Would you believe it? I am reading it right now. I'm half way through and like it very much. Won't tell you anything to spoil your reading, but Hamill must have really done his homework for that period. Are you a fan of New York History?
Doria
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Doria
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Re: European History

Macariojames-- I thank you. I am adding that book to my 'to go' list. You might enjoy the book I just told another fellow member and reader- Pete hamill's Forever. It is not just about African-american history, but there is a lot of interesting stuff in it you might enjoy reading.
Doria
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Doria
Posts: 10
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Re: European History

Macariojames-- Thank you for that book. I have added it to my 'to go' list. You might enjoy the book I just referred to for another fellow reader and member- Pete Hamill's Forver. It is not primarily about African-American history, but he has a lot of very interesting info. included.
Doria
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BookJunkie
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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NYC History

I am a fan of NY history ... its political history, literary/arts/music history, native history. Everything's so concentrated here, history is in your face *everywhere you turn* provided you know what you're looking at. It's fascinating. I grew up in the south which has its own complex history, so I especially love soaking in the history up here, and thinking about the way northern and southern states have reacted (mostly differently) to social issues for centuries now.

But yeah, even though I've been up here 10 years, I still say "wowww" when I walk by a townhouse where some writer lived, or I'm strolling through Prospect Park, and I read a plaque at the very spot where George Washington hid with his troops during the Revolution...

Anyone else?

Now I'm inspired to go read that book Gotham (isbn 0195140494) -- I bought it when it first came out, and have browsed through it, but never read it from cover to cover. Maybe that will be my dead-of-winter reading project (it's about 1400 pages!) :smileyhappy:
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LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: NYC History

I know what you mean about NYC history, I'm also a fan. In NYC, history is everywhere, even if you don't know it's there. I grew up in Brooklyn. Back in the 1960s, learning the history of NYC was part of the curriculum of 7th grade. It was fascinating to us. We learned about the history of the boroughs, about battles & politics, how the city was unified, etc. I still remember it to this day.

Not far from where I grew up was a home with a plaque outside - it was where Jennie Jerome had lived. She's better known as Winston Churchill's mother. The Battle of Brooklyn (or of Long Island) was fought there during the Revolution; among those buried in Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn are Henry Ward Beecher, Boss Tweed, William Livingston, Horace Greeley, and Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. Historic Richmondtown Restoration (a colonial restoration) was not far from my later home on Staten Island, and the Conference House on the South Shore of Staten Island was where a meeting was held between the British and the colonists after the Battle of Brooklyn. History abounds everywhere, especially in Manhattan.



BookJunkie wrote:
I am a fan of NY history ... its political history, literary/arts/music history, native history. Everything's so concentrated here, history is in your face *everywhere you turn* provided you know what you're looking at. It's fascinating. I grew up in the south which has its own complex history, so I especially love soaking in the history up here, and thinking about the way northern and southern states have reacted (mostly differently) to social issues for centuries now.

But yeah, even though I've been up here 10 years, I still say "wowww" when I walk by a townhouse where some writer lived, or I'm strolling through Prospect Park, and I read a plaque at the very spot where George Washington hid with his troops during the Revolution...

Anyone else?

Now I'm inspired to go read that book Gotham (isbn 0195140494) -- I bought it when it first came out, and have browsed through it, but never read it from cover to cover. Maybe that will be my dead-of-winter reading project (it's about 1400 pages!) :smileyhappy:


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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BookJunkie
Posts: 73
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Re: NYC History - Green-Wood Cemetery

You know, I've had Green-Wood Cemetery on my To Do list for way too long now. I think I just need to plan a day and GO, especially while the weather is still tolerable. I think they still even offer Moonlight tours -- though that might be better in the summer...
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LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: NYC History - Green-Wood Cemetery



BookJunkie wrote:
You know, I've had Green-Wood Cemetery on my To Do list for way too long now. I think I just need to plan a day and GO, especially while the weather is still tolerable. I think they still even offer Moonlight tours -- though that might be better in the summer...


If you enter "Green-Wood Cemetery" at wikipedia.com, there's a list of some notables buried there and a link to a page entitled "Burials at Green-Wood Cemetery."
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: WWI

I like to read books, fiction and non-fiction, about the WWI era. Has anyone read the books Testament of Youth and Testament of Experience by Vera Brittain? I also like the poetry of that era. Not just Rupert Brooke, but poets like Wilfred Owen (Dulce et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori).
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Doria
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: NYC History

It's so good to see other NYC History affeciandos here. I too have 'Gotham' to complete. Maybe we can help each other to continue that read. It is interesting how NYC and European history connect. Also, I like Lady Fraser's works.
Doria
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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re:Chicago history, midwest history

I read everything I can get my hands on about the history of Chicago. It's a fascinating city. While reading some books about the Chicago Fire, I also discovered several books about the even bigger fire the same week in Peshtigo, Wisconsin. Those make fascinating reading, too.
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dlcjr
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: European History

On European history, Have you read any of Thomas Cahill's books? Of specific interest to you might be "How the Irish Saved Civilization." My favorite European Hiatory book is Davies'"Europe: A History" though not one that I suspect you sit down to read cover-to-cover. But for targeted reading on a specific period of European history, its great. Regards, DaveC
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