Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Frequent Contributor
mildone
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Just an elderly man who enjoys reading about history. Enjoyed "Resolute"and "Guns,Germs,and Steel", from our recent discussion group.
mildone
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Tap99
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi, I just rediscovered the B and N University/Book clubs section. I seem to be reading a lot of nonfiction in this decade of my life. The History and Current Events category caught my eye. I read nonfiction constantly with an occasional fiction to break it up. I tend to get on period or regional binges until I have satisfied a curiosity.

I am currently reading a classic non-fiction travel book called "The Innocents Abroad" by Mark Twain. It's a bit shocking at times, but I love seeing the world through the eyes of others, (different time periods, different cultures). I think a college course (OSHER class?) based on this steamship excursion to Europe and the Holy Land in 1867/68, with attention to the cultures, politics, religions, and economies of the countries that Twain encountered would be fascinating.
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wburns_kh
Posts: 72
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Welcome to the Book Clubs! What else have you been reading these days?
New User
apple
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-17-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself

hi everyone i'm currently reading palestine peace not apartheid,author jimmy carter.
any opions,comments or future reading materials welcome.
Apple
Frequent Contributor
wburns_kh
Posts: 72
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Jimmy Carter's new book

Welcome to the boards! Carter's book is quite controversial. How are you finding it so far?
Contributor
SCWillson
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Jimmy Carter's new book

Tap99 said:

"I am currently reading a classic non-fiction travel book called "The Innocents Abroad" by Mark Twain. It's a bit shocking at times, but I love seeing the world through the eyes of others, (different time periods, different cultures). I think a college course (OSHER class?) based on this steamship excursion to Europe and the Holy Land in 1867/68, with attention to the cultures, politics, religions, and economies of the countries that Twain encountered would be fascinating."

I read Twain's The Innocent Abroad last summer when I was convalescing from spine surgery and greatly enjoyed it - enough so that I read Ron Powers' excellent biography of Clemens, Mark Twain. One thing you do have to remember about Twain is that the distinction between truth and tall tale blurs in pretty much anything he wrote, even his "non-fiction." He was (and probably remains) America's greatest spinner of fables.

If you liked The Innocents Abroad, I can pretty much guarantee you'll enjoy his story about his experiences on the west coast during the civil war, Roughing It.
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,012
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi, my husband bought this book back in the summertime and could not put it down. When I saw it was listed for this month's book club, I asked him if he still had the book, which he did. He loved the book; I hesitated as to me it sounds like a guy type of book, not something a woman would read. But he encouraged me to read it and I have liked it so far. I hail from NC and don't know a lot about the Cival War but I am a Revolutionary War buff.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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cecil
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-17-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi everyone. I'm new to these boards, but I imagine I will find my home here in the history section. I recently released the book "Maccabee." (Author - David C. Carson) A question has arisen in the process of writing and publishing, for me. Where is the line one crosses from narrative non-fiction to historical fiction? I have read a number of narrative non-fiction accounts in which the author relates things like conversations, thoughts, emotions, etc. that the author could not possibly know and for which there is no source documentation or eye witness. These things would have to be products of the author's imagination. Should that move it to the category of fiction?
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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself


cecil wrote:
Hi everyone. I'm new to these boards, but I imagine I will find my home here in the history section. I recently released the book "Maccabee." (Author - David C. Carson) A question has arisen in the process of writing and publishing, for me. Where is the line one crosses from narrative non-fiction to historical fiction? I have read a number of narrative non-fiction accounts in which the author relates things like conversations, thoughts, emotions, etc. that the author could not possibly know and for which there is no source documentation or eye witness. These things would have to be products of the author's imagination. Should that move it to the category of fiction?


Cecil,
If you read in the preface of this book, and the back I believe, the author kind of addresses that. He lets you know what is fact, and what is narrative and what he uses to show that. For example, if it was a letter he is refering too with their talk and feelings, he puts it all in parentheses. This book is a great example of how to make non-fiction come alive in a near story like manner. Welcome and good luck for the rest of the month, the book is worth the read.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Frequent Contributor
GrammiT
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎03-20-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello, everyone! I have been reading all your posts about the "Manhunt" book & decided to join in. I read this book last year & found it quite fascinating. Of course we all learned in American history that Booth was caught & killed, but I must confess, I did not know about the attacks on all the others. I have always had such a great admiration for Lincoln, and being from Illinois, "the land of Lincoln", a great emphasis has always been put on Lincoln's history. I look forward to joining in the book club discussions for this book & hopefully many others.
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