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Timbuktu1
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Re: Clementine (his wife): Engagement Photo



bentley wrote:

Oldesq wrote:
Gilbert writes that they first met 10 years earlier with WSC being so stumbling shy as to not take a chance to speak to Clementine and missing the opportunity.


Message Edited by Oldesq on 07-14-2008 01:12 PM




I haven't read Gilbert's biography; but at the Churchill Museum; there was a display regarding their courtship and that story which I do not believe was Churchill folklore was cited. I don't think he spoke two words and walked away I think or something totally embarrassing; I guess he was smitten from the get go.

I think that is sweet in a way.




VERY!
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Choisya
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~HG Wells

If you examine the speeches of many great orators you will find that a lot of the lines are plaguarised from other works of literature.  I used to be a speech writer for politicians and I did a lot of plaguarising!:smileyvery-happy:   And every day we plaguarise lines from Shakespeare and Chaucer without knowing it.  An interesting book on the sources of our language is Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson.

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Choisya
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Re: William Bourke Cockran

The leter to Jack is a good example of Churchill's upper-class snobbery:smileysad:.

bentley wrote:
This is a letter that Winston wrote to his brother Jack; a splendid letter which describes his impression of American (lol), judges and juries, firehouses, American journalists, etc.

A delight to read since this was written when he was on his way to his first big war adventure in Cuba. This url is terrific and was part of the Library of Congress exhibit on Winston. It appears that he stayed at first with Cockran.

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/churchill/interactive/_html/wc0019.html


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Choisya
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Re: Snobbery

I think this letter is a good example of Winston's upper-class patronising snobbery - 'snotty nosed maids and footmen', '...American people as a great lusty youth... although some are just as refined and cultured as the best in any country in the world.'  Strangely it reminds me of a wartime anecdote about him.  When Lord Woolton showed him a tray on which were displayed British wartime rations for one person, Churchill commented 'That looks like a decent meal for a day'.  Woolton replied 'They are rations for a week Prime Minister'.  Churchill said 'Good gracious!'  He was very very out of touch with everyday life.  Even the King and Queen made some attempt at frugality and tried to keep within the rations but Churchill was always over-indulgent - no doubt a trait he inherited from his parents.

bentley wrote:
This is a letter that Winston wrote to his brother Jack; a splendid letter which describes his impression of American (lol), judges and juries, firehouses, American journalists, etc.

A delight to read since this was written when he was on his way to his first big war adventure in Cuba. This url is terrific and was part of the Library of Congress exhibit on Winston. It appears that he stayed at first with Cockran.

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/churchill/interactive/_html/wc0019.html


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bentley
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Influences



Choisya wrote:
I think this letter is a good example of Winston's upper-class patronising snobbery - 'snotty nosed maids and footmen', '...American people as a great lusty youth... although some are just as refined and cultured as the best in any country in the world.'  Strangely it reminds me of a wartime anecdote about him.  When Lord Woolton showed him a tray on which were displayed British wartime rations for one person, Churchill commented 'That looks like a decent meal for a day'.  Woolton replied 'They are rations for a week Prime Minister'.  Churchill said 'Good gracious!'  He was very very out of touch with everyday life.  Even the King and Queen made some attempt at frugality and tried to keep within the rations but Churchill was always over-indulgent - no doubt a trait he inherited from his parents.

bentley wrote:
This is a letter that Winston wrote to his brother Jack; a splendid letter which describes his impression of American (lol), judges and juries, firehouses, American journalists, etc.

A delight to read since this was written when he was on his way to his first big war adventure in Cuba. This url is terrific and was part of the Library of Congress exhibit on Winston. It appears that he stayed at first with Cockran.

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/churchill/interactive/_html/wc0019.html







Winston Churchill was definately influenced also by his genteel and upper class upbringing. Hard to eat less; when you have been allowed to eat more and the very best.

No doubt he was shocked and horrified. After visiting the war rooms, I did notice that he had set up his own kitchen area so that meals could be prepared for staff and I imagine himself; and when visiting the Imperial War Museum (I believe) there was an exhibit which showed the week rations on a plate (it was very eye opening). I think he had a voracious appetite though everyone did say he lost a lot weight during the war years; so times were lean for him as well and he did toil long and hard.

I loved that letter because it showed a young man's delight and astonishment at many things including firemen.

Bentley
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bentley
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~HG Wells



Choisya wrote:
If you examine the speeches of many great orators you will find that a lot of the lines are plaguarised from other works of literature.  I used to be a speech writer for politicians and I did a lot of plaguarising!:smileyvery-happy:   And every day we plaguarise lines from Shakespeare and Chaucer without knowing it.  An interesting book on the sources of our language is Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson.






Love Bill Bryson. I think the situation happens all too often.
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Oldesq
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~HG Wells

We recently attended a production of Hamlet at Shakespeare in the Park.  Each time I hear the play I am amazed at how much of the book permeates everyday speech.   
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bentley
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~HG Wells



Oldesq wrote:
We recently attended a production of Hamlet at Shakespeare in the Park.  Each time I hear the play I am amazed at how much of the book permeates everyday speech.   





How true.
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bentley
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~WHO INFLUENCED WINSTON CHURCHILL (Influencers in Winston's Life)

Here is an interesting question:
There are quite a few similarities in Marlborough's life (John Churchill) and Winston Churchill. Marlborough deserted the cause of King James to serve William and Mary, Winston Churchill changed parties during his political life.  Do these actions make them political opportunists?   

 

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bentley
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~WHO INFLUENCED WINSTON CHURCHILL (John Churchill)

Who was John Churchill?

 

John Churchill became the First Duke of Marlborough (1650 - 1722) was a great influence on Winston Churchill.  John's father was named Sir Winston Churchill.  John was considered one of the most gifted generals of his era and has been considered to have played a major role in making England a world power.  John's father was a Catholic while John was a Protestant.  

 

John's father had wealth and was prominent.  But it was John who because of his ability won favor in royal circles. When he was only 25, he served in England's war against Holland.  In 1677-78, he married Sarah Jennings who somehow helped him in his advancement.  He served King James II (1685 -1688) but then turned on him and went over to William and Mary in 1688 because he thought that King James was bent towards Catholicism.  

 

There was a revolution called the "Glorious Revolution" of William and Mary (1688 - 1702) and from that Queen Anne served (1702-1714).  John Churchill got a lot out of that switch in alliance.  In 1689, he was made Earl of Marlborough and in 1702, he was named by Queen Anne as Captain General of English troops.

 

There was the War of the Spanish Succession (1701 - 1714) which involved Britain, Holland and Austria. This alliance was against King Louis XIV of France.  John Churchill now Earl of Marlborough led the combined armies in a victory near a German village called Blenheim (hence the name of the palace built for him).

 

Marlborough was considered a brilliant general, superb diplomat and his men were devoted to him.

 

There were three great battles that he was involved in where he was victorious over the French: Battle of Ramillies (1706), Oudenarde (1708) and Malplaquet (1709).  

 

Because of all of the above, John went from Earl to Duke.  There was a royal manor at Woodstock which was near Oxford which was given to him.  Queen Anne and Parliament built Blenheim Palace for him.  

 

Court intriques led him to fall from power in 1711.  He was not without his detractors: Jonathan Swift, Henry Hallam, and Thomas Babington Macaulay.  

 

Our Winston Churchill, (a descendant of John Churchill) wanted to restore his ancestor's reputation and wrote a four-volume biography, Marlborough, His Life and Times to try to do just that.  

 

Source: Teaching Company 

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bentley
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~WHO INFLUENCED WINSTON CHURCHILL (Lord Salisbury)

In a way, I think Lord Salisbury influenced Winston Churchill's life:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Gascoyne-Cecil,_3rd_Marquess_of_Salisbury

 

First, he certainly changed Winston Churchill's father's life when he accepted his resignation and I believe from all reports he told Lord Randolph; "Gladly".  This in of itself influenced Winston because of the fallout from this acceptance of his father's offered resignation.  It really ruined Lord Randolph and he never recovered.  This really caused a downward spiral in his life and I think repercussions for Winston's whole family.  

 

Secondly, when Lord Salisbury read Winston's published accounts of the wars he was covering and sent for him, I often wonder if Lord Salisbury was reaching out to the son of the father he ruined and that was one of the reasons for sending for him in the first place.  However,  from that conversation Winston benefited and Salisbury was able to secure the next assignment that Winston wanted which I think set him on his future path.  

 

 

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Janie_seppanen_
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Re: MY EARLY LIFE~~WHO INFLUENCED WINSTON CHURCHILL (Influencers in Winston's Life)

I am currently reading a book on winston churchill called WINSTON CHURCHILL Soldier, Statesmen, Artist. I have found it very interesting and look forward to reading more rivetting tales about his intriging life. I am also doing a research paper on him and my books did not tell who his influencers were, so i found it very helpful that you chose to tell about John Churchill.

                                                                               Thank you

                                                                                                 Sincerely Janie