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bentley
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Off-Topic Cafe

Thought I would put in a place to post messages or conversations that do not quite fit within the Mayflower's other discussion threads.

Possibly some related websites or historical urls that you'd like to recommend? Here is the spot.

Also, just a place to chat.
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Carmenere_lady
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

[ Edited ]

bentley wrote:
Thought I would put in a place to post messages or conversations that do not quite fit within the Mayflower's other discussion threads.

Possibly some related websites or historical urls that you'd like to recommend? Here is the spot.

Also, just a place to chat.




Great idea, Bentley. Thanks.

As a matter of fact, as I look around the site, it looks like you've been very busy here. Good job!

Message Edited by Carmenere_lady on 09-08-2007 08:03 AM
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

np Carmenere. Just wanted to spur on some discussion of the book. I did a copy of the last discussion segment concerning Jamestown, etc. I thought it was extremely interesting and you mentioned carrying on the conversation in the Off-Topic Cafe.
________________________________________________________________________________

ABOUT JAMESTOWN:

Librarian wrote:


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
katknit wrote:
Historically, the emphasis was placed on Plymouth Colony by the Colonial Revivalists in the years around 1900. These people were concerned with building a national mythology and rather than authenticity focused upon idealism and romanticism. Hence the John Smith/Pocahontas story and "I cannot tell a lie" and the like. Plymouth colonies religious goals were felt to be purer and more idealistic than the more mercenary goals of Virginia's merchant adventurers. Never mind that the Pilgrims wanted religious freedom for themselves, but not for those who had other ideas. Also, they ate each other in Jamestown - how to incorporate that into the national creation story? We are still dealing with the effects of the stories chosen as representative during the colonial revival, a much more racist, misogynistic, elitist time.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Hi,

Oh, not to be gross or morbid, but I think the Jametown cannibals would've be a great angle. Survival!, being tough in the face of adversity!. Those are things that Americans are made of. However, I must admit, the cannibal story seemed to be overlooked on the tour. It was mentioned though that the settlers landed during a 3 year drought so food would have been of grave concern.


I've just noticed that Bentley set up a new track called off-line cafe, so I'll take future Jamestown thoughts there. Onward to Plymouth! Carmen

Message Edited by Carmenere_lady on 09-08-2007 07:49 AM
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe (Philbrick to be speaking at the Pilgrim Hall Museum in November)

I thought that the calendar of events was interesting from the Pilgrim Hall Museum. Philbrick will be there speaking and signing copies of his books in November:

http://www.pilgrimhall.org/calendar.htm
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe (Decendents, etc)

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Librarian
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

Hi All-----I'm falling victim to my habit of reading more than one book at the same time! So I've only reached page 90 in Mayflower. I'm finding the book very interesting and have been enjoying others' discussions and interesting site postings.I am currently also reading Me by Katharine Hepburn for my in person Book Club. And for my own interest, I'm reading Murder by Coffee by Glenn Ickler; The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford by Ron Hansen. And I've purchased The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler for October discussions. Plus there's more in my "to be read" pile! This site is very addictive (in a pleasant way). I keep finding more and more books I want to read!
Librarian
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

Librarian et al - Boy do I know what you're talking about with reading a number of books at the same time. I used to limit myself to 3 to keep control. That went out the window back in the 80's. Now I'm on a Washington Irving bio by Andrew Burstein, Paula Poundstone's autobio, Edward P. Jones' "The Known World" (for my in-person fiction book club), Absurdistan by Shteyngart (a hoot) and Stalking the Rieman Hypothesis by Rockmore (a survey of modern math centering around an age-old problem - proud to have stayed with it most of the way).
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Mariposa
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

[ Edited ]
I am thinking about joining this book club mainly because I adore the New York Historical Society. I also feel I need a breather from fiction. My question is: Do you know yet what book you will be doing in October?

Lizabeth

Message Edited by dianearbus on 09-17-2007 09:06 AM
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe



dianearbus wrote:
I am thinking about joining this book club mainly because I adore the New York Historical Society. I also feel I need a breather from fiction. My question is: Do you know yet what book you will be doing in October?

Lizabeth

Message Edited by dianearbus on 09-17-2007 09:06 AM




Hello Lizabeth,

In terms of the upcoming selections for October, on the Announcements page (which I checked), I did not see another selection mentioned as yet. Possibly Jim Mackin might know.

Regards,

Bentley
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe



Librarian wrote:
Hi All-----I'm falling victim to my habit of reading more than one book at the same time! So I've only reached page 90 in Mayflower. I'm finding the book very interesting and have been enjoying others' discussions and interesting site postings.I am currently also reading Me by Katharine Hepburn for my in person Book Club. And for my own interest, I'm reading Murder by Coffee by Glenn Ickler; The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford by Ron Hansen. And I've purchased The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler for October discussions. Plus there's more in my "to be read" pile! This site is very addictive (in a pleasant way). I keep finding more and more books I want to read!
Librarian




Librarian, I know it is hard when you start reading (with a deadline) multiple books. I am doing Mayflower, Peony with Love, Snow, and War and Peace. I definately bit off more than I can handle. Almost done with War and Peace and getting back to Mayflower which I find to be a fascinating book. All of the ones that you have selected seem to be great reads. You are really organized to have already decided on an October selection to boot.

Jim, do you know what the October History selection will be? Dianearbus was asking. I saw nothing in the announcements segment though other genre clubs were listed.

Regards,

Bentley
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jimmackin
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

Bentley, Librarian et al - Our October History selection will be David Halberstam's "The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War". It is due to be released later this month, so keep looking. I'll also note this in the Moderator thread.
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe


jimmackin wrote:
Bentley, Librarian et al - Our October History selection will be David Halberstam's "The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War". It is due to be released later this month, so keep looking. I'll also note this in the Moderator thread.




Thanks Jim..just saw it posted in the new Announcements page with a blurb..here it is:

The History Book Club reads The Coldest Winter by David Halberstam.

Up until now, the Korean War has been the black hole of modern American history. The Coldest Winter changes that. Halberstam gives us a masterful narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides. At the heart of the book are the individual stories of the soldiers on the front lines who were left to deal with the consequences of the dangerous misjudgements and competing agendas of powerful men.
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Mariposa
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

Thank you. I just might join you discussing that one and Bentley, hello. Good to see you again.
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe



dianearbus wrote:
Thank you. I just might join you discussing that one and Bentley, hello. Good to see you again.




Hello to you to Lizabeth. Good to see you too.
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe



bentley wrote:


dianearbus wrote:
Thank you. I just might join you discussing that one and Bentley, hello. Good to see you again.




Hello to you to Lizabeth. Good to see you too.




Guess I got caught up in to's and too's.

I actually do not know much about the Korean War at all. It might be interesting. I am finishing off so many books right now..I am finding it hard to keep up. But by month's end I will be done I suspect.
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

Hi all,

My family and I enjoy visiting historical sites so I'm curious, has anyone here visited the area of the Plymouth settlement? If we were to visit what would we see? Museum, artifacts....etc.? Would anything from the book be recognizable, for example, Fort Hill?

I'm enjoying Mayflower but am only on The Wall and I'm getting the feeling that nothing good can come out of this action, but I'll see.

As well as Mayflower I'm also reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I finally joined the HP bandwagon and started reading the series this summer.

Carmen
Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
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bentley
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe

[ Edited ]

Carmenere_lady wrote:
Hi all,

My family and I enjoy visiting historical sites so I'm curious, has anyone here visited the area of the Plymouth settlement? If we were to visit what would we see? Museum, artifacts....etc.? Would anything from the book be recognizable, for example, Fort Hill?

I'm enjoying Mayflower but am only on The Wall and I'm getting the feeling that nothing good can come out of this action, but I'll see.

As well as Mayflower I'm also reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I finally joined the HP bandwagon and started reading the series this summer.

Carmen




Hello Carmen,

I have never visited the Plymouth Plantation or Plymouth for that matter. (The Plantation and the Mayflower II are in different locations in Plymouth).

Here are a couple of urls that might help. If you are also reading the Harry Potter books...I hope we see you back soon. You are correct so far in the direction things are going...but I have learned alot in the meantime that I was not aware of.

http://www.plimoth.org

http://pilgrims.net/plimothplantation/vtour

http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/activity/plymouth

Message Edited by bentley on 09-21-2007 10:22 AM
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe - Fort Hill

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Re: Off-Topic Cafe - Fort Hill

In terms of historical travel, Plymouth is tops. Another favorite of mine that factors in the larger scheme of King Philip's War is Deerfieldm MA. It's the quntissential pre-Revolutionary New England town, and it's beautiful and under-attended. It's well worth a trip up the Connecticut River valley.
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Re: Off-Topic Cafe



Carmenere_lady wrote:
'GYHhh&r> Hi all,

My family and I enjoy visiting historical sites so I'm curious, has anyone here visited the area of the Plymouth settlement?
I've been to Plymouth Plantation many times. The village is built on a hill very similar to the actual site, which was built over long ago. So you get a strong and accurate sense of what it was like with respect to place, people, and daily life. Living history, none of the "Pilgrims" would refer to themselves as such and are very good at remaining in their respective roles. The fort's just a large, squarish, enclosed structure. There's also a small Wampanoag settlement, only a wigwam or 2 and a small patch of maize. If I remember correctly, the interpreters are Wampanoag descendants and they are given free reign in their presentations.
There is a pretty good museum with 17th century objects, some identified with specific individuals. The cemetery is interesting to wander and peruse. The Mayflower replica is terrific. Stand on that deck by the pier and you'll marvel at the courage of those who sailed the oceans in a teacup like that!
I think Plymouth is well worth the visit. There's enough to do for a stay of several days, with the cranberry bog and exhibits and some other stuff, and Cape Cod is very close.
Good weekend,
Linda
No two persons ever read the same book. [Edmund Wilson]