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BarbaraN
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: Hobbit Artwork

[ Edited ]
And a delightful comic style rendition of The Hobbit. Anyone know where you can find this book?

http://fan.theonering.net/rolozo/collection/wenzel-hobbit-en?hide=-5

I found Wenzel's artwork but not the book:

http://www.davidwenzel.com/hobbit.html

Message Edited by BarbaraN on 01-20-2008 10:16 AM
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BarbaraN
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: Hobbit Artwork

I found an Illustrated Hobbit but I am not sure if it is the same thing since it does not have Wenzel's name on it. It still might be good. Has anyone ever seen this book?

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780345445...
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BarbaraN
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Is The Hobbit for Children Only?

I do have a general question I would like to put out to the group and that is about the classification of The Hobbit in Tolkien's body of works. There is no doubt that it originated and was specifically written as a children's book. I have seen remarks that dismiss it as an inferior product because of that.

This is something I disagree with, especially after his major revisions to make it fit better with the whole LOTR series. It certainly is lighter but I see it as a foundation book and maybe sets a certain tone for a simpler time before the dark times of LOTR. The Quest of Eredor and Chapter 5 are directly related to what happens in LOTR. It also defines the character and resourcefulness potential in the character of hobbits that is so crucial in LOTR.

The other thing I liked about it, is that Tolkien is in a more playful mood and has a bit of fun with the way he words things. I think this is consistent with the style of the beginning of the LOTR and eases us into the heavier tale to follow.

So I was wondering what the rest of you think about this subject. Is the Hobbit something that adults would enjoy reading and is it important part of he saga of Middle-earth?
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lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
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Re: Is The Hobbit for Children Only?

I don't think The Hobbit is "just for children" at all. In fact I dislike that term and distinction very much. A good piece of literature can be read on many levels and the best can be read by young and old alike.

The Hobbit is a book that you can read many times. Each time there is more to find in it. I don't think Tolkien talks down to anyone including children. There is a lot of depth to this book. I also think of it as a standalone book that has merit in its own right. Some people write this book off as just a light prologue to the Ring series.

Unfortunately, I think this attitude as resulted in the fact that there are no serious movies based on it except a cartoon version (though I liked it). Of course this is due to change in the future and with the Peter Jackson treatment I think people will have a great deal more respect for the book as piece of literature once that is completed.
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Eldarion
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Is The Hobbit for Children Only?



BarbaraN wrote:
I do have a general question I would like to put out to the group and that is about the classification of The Hobbit in Tolkien's body of works. There is no doubt that it originated and was specifically written as a children's book. I have seen remarks that dismiss it as an inferior product because of that.

This is something I disagree with, especially after his major revisions to make it fit better with the whole LOTR series. It certainly is lighter but I see it as a foundation book and maybe sets a certain tone for a simpler time before the dark times of LOTR. The Quest of Eredor and Chapter 5 are directly related to what happens in LOTR. It also defines the character and resourcefulness potential in the character of hobbits that is so crucial in LOTR.

The other thing I liked about it, is that Tolkien is in a more playful mood and has a bit of fun with the way he words things. I think this is consistent with the style of the beginning of the LOTR and eases us into the heavier tale to follow.

So I was wondering what the rest of you think about this subject. Is the Hobbit something that adults would enjoy reading and is it important part of he saga of Middle-earth?




I think The Hobbit definately has a more light hearted feel to it. It lacks the danger and darkness that LOTR has. This, I think makes people think it is a kids book. I don't think it is geared specifically towards kids, but I do think kids can read it. From my perspective it serves as the perfect introduction to LOTR. In reading the Hobbit you get a feel for Middle Earth and the characters therein, and you also get a brief introduction to the ring. Not to mention you get to know hobbits, and how strong they are, which is central to LOTR. I don't know if it is what Tolkien intended, but I have always looked at The Hobbit as a long intro. to LOTR.
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kpov
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎05-05-2008
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Re: Hobbit

i absolutely love this book!
It's a love story, baby just say yes.
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: Hobbit

i absolutely love this book!
love,
kp ♥
--------------------------------------------
Don't we all, Welcome!
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lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
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Re: Hobbit


kpov wrote:
i absolutely love this book!




Hi, kp. The thread is always open. Join in if you like. What do you like about The Hobbit? The story, the characters, Bilbo and his adventures?

I'm a Smaug fan myself. I think he is so neat and smart--at least until he looses his temper. I hadn't realized before that dragons could actually be intelligent. I'm also partial to dwarfs. They have a great attitude toward life. But my favorite dwarf is Gimli in LOTR. He is so sentimental and really loves beauty. But of all the hobbits in all the books, I think Bilbo is the greatest hero. He is brave and resourceful.

Welcome. Hope you decide to stay or at least drop in from time to time.
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kpov
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎05-05-2008
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Re: Hobbit

i liked the hobbit because i love adventures!
there was never a dull moment in the book and all the characters were very interesting.
:-)
It's a love story, baby just say yes.
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TrueBlue
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-06-2008
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Re: Hobbit

I personly like Here And Back Again a lot more than the Lord of The Rings, It is not so wordy. I mean how long can you read about sun glinting off leaves?
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lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
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Re: Hobbit


TrueBlue wrote:
I personly like Here And Back Again a lot more than the Lord of The Rings, It is not so wordy. I mean how long can you read about sun glinting off leaves?

There are quite a few people here who prefer The Hobbit more than LOTR. It is a fun story and has a great hero in Bilbo who seems to get into a lot of trouble but manages to get out of it and has one adventure after another. It also has Smaug -- now how can you beat that! LOTR is more serious and more ambiguous. We never could figure out who was the true hero of that book.

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oldBPLstackdenizen
Posts: 633
Registered: ‎12-19-2007
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Re: Hobbit

I read both "The Hobbit" and LOTR when I was young ( still a child ) but there was a period inbetween the time I first read  [ H ] and the time when I found out that LOTR even existed ( possibly several months, at least )...

 

Even to this day, even though both books were written by the same author, and came out of the same "vision" of JRRT, and were tied together by the circumstances recorded in both stories -

the world of [ H ] and the world of LOTR always seemed to me to still be basically two seperate worlds -

( especially when I reflect back on that "interim period" when the imaginary world of [ H ] was the one I had become so close and familiar with [ and which was the progenitor of many of my "imagination games" ], and being totally unaware of the  more elaborate, expanded Middle-earth world of LOTR ) ---

And, although there was much more detail to be explored in LOTR, whereas there was so much more vagueness all around the edges in [ H ], that was part of the great charm of [ H ] as well...

LOTR ( by necessity, because of its greater scope ) of course tends to be more complicated,

whereas [ H ] tends to be more simple, straightforward and direct, and less heavy than LOTR ---

 

And, even though I could never feel that JRRT was ever actually being pretentious in any way, one could even almost say that [ H ] is less pretentious than LOTR, as well...

 

I guess what I'm saying that is both books have their own distinct kinds of enchantment,

and also that, although [ H ] is generally thought to be a "prelude" to LOTR, I can't help feeling like it is more seperate from LOTR than that - to be enjoyed on its own merits, and for its own special charm...

but it does still stand more alone to itself as almost as seperate entity, in spite of being a "direct relation" to LOTR ---

 

ardo 

"Middle-earth Is A State Of Mind"
^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^

Ardo Whortleberry
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