Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

The Hobbit: Chapter 1, The Unexpected Party

Chapter 1 The Unexpected Party

Some of us have been marking time since November 22 waiting for the Tolkien discussion to get started! We have lost a lot of people in that time. I don't think it would hurt if we begin our discussion about Chapter 1 of the Hobbit. It is only 23 pages. We won't be leaving potential newcomers behind in that few pages! Paul can still set up his own game plan.

This is an important chapter for setting up the story of The Hobbit (and for LOTR). We can probably spend the next few days before the official start of the month talking about it.

We can also tie in events to this particular chapter from our fill-in readings of Prologue to the LOTR (Fellowship of the Ring) on "Concerning Hobbits", Appendix A, part III to LOTR (The Return of the King) on "Durin's Folk", and the Quest of Erebor that is included in short form in "Durin's Folk" or reprinted fully as Appendix A in the Annotated Hobbit, all of which contribute to the first chapter of The Hobbit. Beside we have several people in the group reading "Mr. Baggins" and I hope they share some of what they know with the rest of us who are not quite up to reading that massive work yet!

I see this first chapter in six segments

- Concerning Hobbits
- Bilbo's "Call to Adventure"
- The arrival of Dwarves and learning a bit about them
- The background information on their situation
- Billbo the reluctant hero
- The map, nature, and details of the quest

That is a lot to pack into 23 pages but I think Tolkien has carried it out very successful and in such a way that we are given a great deal of information in a very brief and readable way.

A new thread here should help unclutter the new from the old. It is time to get this journey underway! Or at least step out of the door.

“[I]t's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door….You step into the Road and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to.…”
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Concerning Hobbits

Concerning Hobbits

"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit."

And so we begin our four month adventure with the all important hobbits and especially the traits that make them so important in this book concerning Bilbo, the reluctant burglar, and also in the LOTR concerning Frodo, Merry, Pippin and Sam, the unlikely saviors of the world.

Here is my take on these first few pages

I think these first couple of pages lay the groundwork for the whole series. These are just ordinary folks, living a comfortable uneventful existence, but it is these ordinary people that are the foundation of civilization and can rise to the occasion and show their true "quality" when required. If you want more on Hobbits, you can read the Prologue to the LOTR,

I also like the way Tolkien expresses things. He has subtle and not so subtle sense of humor. They are not just throw away phrases but actually tell you something about hobbits in general and Bilbo in particular. Using humor he tells us quite a bit without being boring. Maybe you can share some of your favorite ones.

The third important thing I see already in these first couple of pages is Tolkien's emphasizing heredity as very important to character. We will see this throughout the series. It isn't who you have become through your own experience so much as it is your destiny because of your heredity. Now I may be reading Tolkien wrong here, but that is my initial impression. Bilbo was a Baggins and that made him conservative. But he was also a Took and, well, you know about those Tooks. Always having adventures that had to be hushed up and one of them may have even married a fairy! This is a totally opposite to J. K. Rowling's take on the subject in the Harry Potter series, where she emphasizes that it is the "choices in life we make" and it doesn't matter who your parents or ancestors were.
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Call to Adventure

Call to Adventure

"By some curious chance one morning long ago in the quiet of the world, when there was less noise and more green, and the hobbits were still numerous and prosperous, and Bilbo Baggins was standing at his door after breakfast smoking an enormous long wooden pipe that reached nearly down to his woolly toes (neatly brushed) -- Gandalf came by."

I love the way Tolkien says things. He has such a sense of humor but it is always informative --"in the quiet of the world" -- you know he is talking about a peaceful and comfortable life of a time gone by. And "neatly brushed" that is our fastidious hobbit. But then Gandalf enters his comfortable world. The conversation between Gandalf and Bilbo is one of the most delightful in the book. There is a more serious side to this little encounter as told in the Quest of Erebor that sets the stage for the events that take place in LOTR.

This is another place to share you favorite quotes.
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Dwarves Arrive and it is Party Time

Dwarves Arrive and it is Party Time

"Just before tea-time there came a tremendous ring on the front-door bell....It was a dwarf with a blue beard tucked into a golden belt...He hung his hooded cloak on the nearest peg, and 'Dwalin at your service!' he said with a low bow."

I’ll add my own comments later.
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

The Adventure

The Adventure

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away ere break of day
To seek the pale enchanted gold.

In good dwarf fashion, Tolkien tells us about the adventure in a song. This is intended to be a light-hearted story but has a bit seriousness to it as well. There is more to this as we will see and this is covered in more detail in Durin's Folk--a light-hearted beginning to a tale that ends tragically in tunnels of Moria in the LOTR.
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

The Very Reluctant Hero

The Very Reluctant Hero

'Poor Bilbo couldn't bear it any longer. At "may never return" he began to feel a shriek coming up inside, and very soon it burst out like the whistle of an engine coming out of tunnel.'

This is where we get the tug-of-war between the Baggins and Took side of Bilbo. But Gandalf knows what he is doing and believes a hobbit can rise to any occasion, a trait that will be all important later on in the story and ultimately in the LOTR.
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

The Map and the Quest

The Map and the Quest

"On the table in the light of a big lamp with a red shade he [Gandalf] spread a piece of parchment rather like a map....'There is a dragon marked in red on the Mountain,' said Barlin, 'but it will be easy enough to find him without that, if ever we arrive there.'"
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Concerning Hobbits

Tolkien himself was a hobbit. In the Annotated Hobbit there is a quote from Tolkien's biographer Humphries Carpenter:

"In the story, Bilbo Baggins, son of the lively Balladonna Took, herself one the three remarkable daughters of the Old Took, descended also from the respectable and solid Bagginses, is middle aged and unadventurous, dresses in sensible clothes but likes bright colours, and has a taste for plain food....John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, son of the enterprising Mabel Suffield, herself one of the three remarkable daughters of John Suffield (who lived to be nearly a hundred), descended also from the respectable and solid Tolkiens, was middle aged and inclined to pessimism, dressed in sensible clothes but liked coloured waistcoats when he could afford them, and had a taste for plain food."

Not only is Tolkien modeling the hobbits after himself but the hobbits represent the common man. The ordinary fellow who lives a quiet, simple life, seeking nothing more than a good job, a comfortable home, pleasant companionship, simple food and a happy family. No one significant, common but unnoticed. This is his starting point. Our hero is not of a heroic nature but is everyman--you and me. Of all the choices this is who Gandalf seeks out for his "little" but ultimately, significant "adventure."
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Call to Adventure

I do love this conversation. Gandalf is so literal with words and turns them around amusingly. This is a great exchange.

"Indeed for your old grandfather Took's sake, and for the sake of poor Belladonna, I will give you what you asked for."

[Bilbo] "I beg your pardon, I haven't asked for anything!"

"Yes, you have! Twice now. My pardon. I give it you."

But Gandalf does have a purpose and not at all to the liking of poor stay-at-home Bilbo. Gandalf continues:

"In fact I will go so far as to send you on this adventure. Very amusing for me, very good for you -- and profitable too, very likely, if you ever get over it." [I also love the way he drops in those somewhat scary remarks here and there as well]

"Sorry! I don't want any adventures, thank you. Not today. Good morning! But please come to tea -- any time you like! Why not tomorrow?"
Frequent Contributor
BarbaraN
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Dwarves Arrive and it is Party Time

Tolkien had some fun with his dwarf names but he was pretty authentic in his sources. The names of the dwarves in the Hobbit and for that matter Gandalf himself, come from the Voluspo of the Poetic Edda. Here is a link to a translation of that poem and then I've copied over the appropriate passage. Skim through it and you should find just about all of the names. A Durin isn't in the adventurous group but he is a very important dwarf.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe03.htm

9. Then sought the gods | their assembly-seats,
The holy ones, | and council held,
To find who should raise | the race of dwarfs
Out of Brimir's blood | and the legs of Blain.

10. There was Motsognir | the mightiest made
Of all the dwarfs, | and Durin next;
Many a likeness | of men they made,
The dwarfs in the earth, | as Durin said.

11. Nyi and Nithi, | Northri and Suthri,
Austri and Vestri, | Althjof, Dvalin,
Nar and Nain, | Niping, Dain,
Bifur, Bofur, | Bombur, Nori,
An and Onar, | Ai, Mjothvitnir.

12. Vigg and Gandalf | Vindalf, Thrain,
Thekk and Thorin, | Thror, Vit and Lit,
Nyr and Nyrath,-- | now have I told--
Regin and Rathsvith-- | the list aright.

13. Fili, Kili, | Fundin, Nali,
Heptifili, | Hannar, Sviur,
Frar, Hornbori, | Fræg and Loni,
Aurvang, Jari, | Eikinskjaldi.

14. The race of the dwarfs | in Dvalin's throng
Down to Lofar | the list must I tell;
The rocks they left, | and through wet lands
They sought a home | in the fields of sand.

15. There were Draupnir | and Dolgthrasir,
Hor, Haugspori, | Hlevang, Gloin,
Dori, Ori, | Duf, Andvari,
Skirfir, Virfir, | Skafith, Ai.

16. Alf and Yngvi, | Eikinskjaldi,
Fjalar and Frosti, | Fith and Ginnar;
So for all time | shall the tale be known,
The list of all | the forbears of Lofar.
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Dwarves Arrive and it is Party Time


leakybucket wrote:
Dwarves Arrive and it is Party Time

"Just before tea-time there came a tremendous ring on the front-door bell....It was a dwarf with a blue beard tucked into a golden belt...He hung his hooded cloak on the nearest peg, and 'Dwalin at your service!' he said with a low bow."

I’ll add my own comments later.




When I first read The Hobbit, the numerous dwarves all seemed the same to me. After all there are 13 of them! The only ones that stood out were Thorin, as the singled out leader, and Bombur, the fat one. I now know that isn't Tolkien's way. Each dwarf had to have a history and a personality and it would be consistent throughout The Hobbit. So I thought this time through I would sort them out as they came in the front door of Bilbo's house and then follow them as individuals through the Adventure. I've been doing lots of homework and research while waiting to start The Hobbit but it will take me awhile to assemble all my notes. I'll start with the first two to arrive, Dwalin and Balin.

Dwalin and Balin

The first one to arrive was Dwalin. He had a blue beard, golden belt and a dark green hood. He had tea. He was the younger brother of the next to arrive, Balin. Like his brother, he played the viol. He was the one who lent Bilbo the green hood when Bilbo had left home in such a hurry that he had nothing with him. It was that same green hood, ragged and patched, that Bilbo kept. When he left Bag End for the final time on his 111 birthday Bilbo put on that hood again. Beyond that I don't know very much more about Dwalin but I may be able to add more later on.

The next to arrive was his older, and he is very old, brother Balin. He has a white beard and a red hood. He had beer and seed cake. He also played the viol. Balin was a rather important dwarf and the senior member of the group. He was brave and behaved very kindly towards Bilbo, coming to his aid and giving him moral support. He usually served as look-out for the group. He had some special jobs that were pointed out in the Hobbit. I don't remember all of them now but he was the one who watched the guards while Bilbo packed the dwarves into the barrels and he also was the one who accompanied Bilbo part of the way down the tunnel when Bilbo had his meeting with Smaug and carried him back after he was singed. Balin was also the one who went with Bilbo to the lookout guard house on the Lonely Mountain where they encountered the raven who told them Smaug was dead. You might want to keep a close watch on Balin in this adventure and see what else he does.

Later on, long after his Adventure with Bilbo, Balin along with Ori and Oin (who arrive a bit later) and some other dwarf companions, went to Khazad-dum in Moria where Balin became the Lord of Moria. But their mithral mining efforts had stirred up the Balrog. Balin was killed by Orcs and it was his tomb that The Fellowship discovers when they reach the Great Hall in Moria. So that kind of connects the dots.
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Concerning Hobbits

I have also been trying to sort out hobbits.

According to the Prologue to the LOTR there were three breeds of hobbits but I gather by the time of our story they had intermixed in the Shire:

Harfoots - "Browner of skin, smaller and shorter, and they were beardless and bootless; There hands and feet were near and nimble; they preferred highlands and hillsides."

Fallohides - "Fairer of skin and also of hair, and they were taller and slimmer than the others; they were lovers of trees and of woodlands." The Tooks and the Masters of Bucklands had a strong Fallohidish strain.

Stoors - "Were broader, heavier in build; their feet and hands were larger, and they preferred flat lands and riversides." I believe Gollum was a Stoors. I don't know all the timelines but I read somewhere that The Ring prolonged his life and Gollum had The Ring 470 years before he ran into Bilbo. He had originally been a river folk.
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Heredity vs Envirmonment

[ Edited ]
The third important thing I see already in these first couple of pages is Tolkien's emphasizing heredity as very important to character. We will see this throughout the series. It isn't who you have become through your own experience so much as it is your destiny because of your heredity. Now I may be reading Tolkien wrong here, but that is my initial impression. Bilbo was a Baggins and that made him conservative. But he was also a Took and, well, you know about those Tooks. Always having adventures that had to be hushed up and one of them may have even married a fairy! This is a totally opposite to J. K. Rowling's take on the subject in the Harry Potter series, where she emphasizes that it is the "choices in life we make" and it doesn't matter who your parents or ancestors were.
--------------------------------------------

I wonder if this doesn't have more to do with the time Tolkien lived in and the fact that he was also deeply into mythology and genealogy. In these tales, even the nobody turned out to be the son of a king or something. He had to be faithful to the way these stories were told. So it was your blood line that symbolically made you either good or bad. His society is also predominately male with male heroes. I don't think there is even one female in The Hobbit and darn few in LOTR. If he had been writing his books fifty years later they may have taken a different slant. Though Rowling emphasizes choices, she still has the bloodlines play a factor where the bad guys are decedent from Slitherin. I have not paid much attention to this issue, but it might be worth tracking as we go through the series. Sam Gamgee didn't come from any special bloodline that I know of and he was true hero in the LOTR.

I think the genealogy is a symbolic factor, an inherited trait and responsibility more than a determinant of character in these books. These people have to still face choices, and it is the choices they make that make the difference.

But then Gandalf does bring up in the Quest of Eredor the idea of predetermination vs chance. I will have to reread that more carefully but I think he leaves it very ambiguous.

Lorien

Message Edited by lorien on 01-23-2008 09:49 PM
Frequent Contributor
BarbaraN
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Hobbit: Chapter 1, The Unexpected Party

[ Edited ]
This may seem a bit premature but I assume most people on this forum are at least familiar with LOTR if only through the movies. I am noticing a few obvious and not so obvious parallels between the first chapter of The Hobbit and the first Chapter of the LOTR.

First the chapter titles are similar:
The Unexpected Party
A Long-Expected Party

The general content also is similar. Both chapters are somewhat humorous, though the LOTR is a bit more serious. After an introduction to hobbit life in both, there is the arrival of Gandalf. Both introduce us to the upcoming Adventure. In LOTR Bilbo actually leaves and goes on his way and the next reluctant hero, Frodo, takes center stage and inherits The Ring. The first chapters are only the set up and our respective heroes actually leave on their journeys in the second chapters.

There is also a curious echo of similar wording. This is something I did not notice until I listened to the audio. They are not the same wording but similar, but it was more in the sound of the words that I noticed a similar connection.

In The Hobbit, after Bilbo has his fit of fright, Gandalf defends him and says:

"There is a lot more in him than you guess, and a deal more than he has any idea of himself"

In LOTR Bilbo is giving his party speech and he says:

"I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."

The topics don't relate at all but as I said, it was in hearing the audio that I heard a sound echo of each statement.

The second one does bear a resemblance at least in topic and certainly in wording.

In the Hobbit Gandalf gives Thorin a silver key that is very important to his mission. He says: "Keep it safe!" Thorin then fastens it on a chain that he hangs around his neck.

In LOTR Frodo has just inherited The Ring and Gandalf says to him "I say again: keep it safe, and keep it secret!" Later on Frodo also fastens it on a chain that he hangs around his neck.

I have not actually compared the two chapters but I feel that Tolkien deliberately made some parallels to them to tie the two stories together.

Message Edited by BarbaraN on 01-24-2008 04:56 PM
Frequent Contributor
Eldarion
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Hobbit: Chapter 1, The Unexpected Party

I have to confess that I have not started re-reading the Hobbit yet. I'm finishing up another book, and should be done soon. I will be ready to go by February, but I will offer some thoughts on things that I remember or think of until I start.
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Dwarves Arrive and it is Party Time

Kili and Fili

I almost think of Kili and Fili as twins. They were both young, looked alike as they were brothers, and did almost everything in The Hobbit together. They arrived together at the third ring at the door. They both wore blue hoods, silver bells, had yellow beards, carried tools and spades, and each played the fiddle. When they were in the storm in the Misty Mountains, it was Kili and Fili who found the cave that turned out to be the front porch of the goblins. In Mirkwood, Fili's most notable achievement was the retrieval of the boat that took them across the Enchanted Stream and Kili was the one who spotted the elven fires. Kili and Fili were the least effected by the trip down river in the barrels and helped Bilbo free the others. However, Fili was the one who had been packed in the apple barrel and was sick of apple smell.

Fili and Kili along with Balin went with Bilbo to checkout the front entrance of the dragon's cave on the Lonely Mountain and were with Bilbo when he discovered the secret entrance. They both played golden harps from the treasure hoard. It was Kili and Fili who retrieved the run off ponies.

Both Kili and Fili died in the Battle of the Five Armies.
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The Hobbit: Chapter 1, The Unexpected Party


Eldarion wrote:
I have to confess that I have not started re-reading the Hobbit yet. I'm finishing up another book, and should be done soon. I will be ready to go by February, but I will offer some thoughts on things that I remember or think of until I start.



No need to feel rushed or you are falling behind. Some of us have been marking time for about two months now. Trying to talk around the books was getting boring and difficult. So we are only talking about the first chapter until February just to do something and feel that we are at least started. The actually reading and discussion of The Hobbit has not officially started. Of course in the next 10 days you may learn more about dwarves than you really ever cared to know! I've got 9 more to go!
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Gandalf's Plan

Gandalf's Plan

In the Quest of Erebor, Gandalf explains his "plan" and how the events of The Hobbit effected the events that eventually transpired in LOTR. Most of which he covered pertains to what took place in the first Chapter of The Hobbit: what was his plan, why he chose Bilbo, and the importance he and Thorin had to play in the whole matter was retold in his Quest for Erebor. This was a story he told to to some members of the original Fellowship after the events of LOTR. Erebor was the name of the kingdom under The Lonely Mountain and the Quest is the story retold in The Hobbit.

The Threat of Sauron

When Tolkien wrote The Hobbit he had not yet created Sauron as a special personality. Here he is only referred to as the "necromancer." Gandalf's was very concerned about the return to power of Sauron and was worried that he might attack the lands to the north. The elvin villages of Rivendell and Lothlorien were especially vulnerable. And then there was the problem of the dragon Smaug. Smaug would be a terrible weapon in the hands of Sauron.

Chance Meeting with Thorin

Then he happen to meet Thorin on the road not far from the village of Bree. Thorin Oakenshield was rightful king of Erebor but Smaug had killed most of his kin. After destroying the town of Dale, he moved in to snooze on all the gold they had hoarded in there. Thorin wanted to raise an army of dwarves to retake Erebor or Kingdom Under the Mountain (The Lonely Mountain). Gandalf thought this was not a workable solution. However, he could see an advantage in helping Thorin and ridding the area of Smaug. He came up with a different approach to the problem that included Bilbo as a key player. He also had plans to go to The White Council and persuade them to attack Sauron from the west and thereby distract Sauron from an easy victory to the north. This was his destination when he left Bilbo and the dwarves at Milkwood Forest.
Frequent Contributor
lorien
Posts: 770
Registered: ‎12-25-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Gandalf's Plan

Gandalf's Plan - Part 2

Concerning Hobbits

Hobbits were a little people who lived simply in the Shire and were mostly unknown to the rest of Middle-earth. Gandalf, however, had been interesting in them and visited the area from time to time to study them.

"...[T]hen there was the Shire-folk. I began to have a warm place in my heart for them in the Long Winter...[T]hat was the time to see their courage, and their pity one for another. It was by their pity as much as by their tough uncomplaining courage that they survive."

He had befriend the Tooks especially. When he started to formulate his plan he thought of the hobbits and how they might be just the element in his plan that would make it work. So he decided to pick a hobbit for his expedition.

"I want a dash of the Took (but not too much)...a good foundation of the stolider sort, a Baggins perhaps....That pointed at once to Bilbo....I remembered how he used to pester me with questions when he was a youngster about the Hobbits that had occasionally 'gone off'' as they said in the Shire."
Frequent Contributor
BarbaraN
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Gandalf's Plan

[ Edited ]
"...[T]hen there was the Shire-folk. I began to have a warm place in my heart for them in the Long Winter...[T]hat was the time to see their courage, and their pity one for another. It was by their pity as much as by their tough uncomplaining courage that they survive."

======================

This is an important point that I think Tolkien wants to make because it comes up again in LOTR. It is the "pity" of the hobbits that is their most important trait. Gandalf specifically states that it was pity that kept Bilbo from killing Gollum and that Gollum might still have an important part to play. This turned out to be very true. It was also Frodo's pity toward Gollum that was an important factor in the success of his quest. After all it was Gollum and Gollum alone who made it possible for them to get to Mt. Doom. I think we might see this in the rest of the hobbits as we go along but off the top of my head I can't think of anything specific right now.

Gandalf also singles out their courage. You wouldn't think it so of these fun-loving, small people but when they are in a difficult situation they can show great courage. I'm working mainly from the movie right now since I don't remember the book too well, but this proved to be true of all the hobbits. And I might also add an unusual amount of fortitude to carry on the task. I think this was Sam's most important trait, and of course Frodo's.

This first chapter of The Hobbit establishes the essential character of the hobbit that carries through the entire series. Even in the first chapter, where Bilbo is a most reluctant participant, he does show spunk and then later on the rest of his qualities.

I don't know how much of The Hobbit was revised to make it "fit" better with LOTR but I don't think the first chapter was changed much--at least the Annotated Hobbit doesn't indicate anything other than very minor wording changes.

Message Edited by BarbaraN on 01-25-2008 08:38 PM
Users Online
Currently online: 45 members 271 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: