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JamesRollins
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Registered: ‎07-25-2007
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Re: Pssst!

Yep....definitely a Leo. Everyone who learns I'm a Leo goes "ah, now it all makes sense."

Jim


Learn more about The Judas Strain.
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vivico1
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Re: Pssst!


JamesRollins wrote:
Yep....definitely a Leo. Everyone who learns I'm a Leo goes "ah, now it all makes sense."

Jim


I am an Aquarius, so yeah, ahh, Leo makes sense to me lol.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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vivico1
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To Jim, if you are still around :smileywink: and everyone who might be interested. On the Today Show this morning on NBC was an interview with some guy who wrote a book called: If Humans Disappeared: The World Without Us. I didnt get his name but its about what would happen to the earth if something killed off all human life. What would happen to all the things man has made from Urban Cities to the Great Wall of China? How long would it take mother earth to reclaim it all and would it change the geography and waterways of the whole world? Sounds like it might be interesting so given some of the things we talked about in here, I thought I would let you know about it. Vivian
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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seattle1
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What an interesting idea, Viveco. I wouldn't think it would change waterways and constructions like the Great Wall of China. I can imagine how all the bodies might clog waterways and highways for a while until they decompose or maybe changes wrought by accidents as ships crash into waterway boundaries as their navigators die but I would think Man's constructs would remain otherwise. Funny, I had been thinking back to the first (original) Star Trek movie with V_ger's mechanical voice explaining it was heading to earth to get rid of the carbon infestations (us) which had over run the planet. I have read/heard that current humans are descended from a small population that survived some mega disaster and then re-populated the earth. It would be sad if there wasn't another small population to start over again in the scenario above. I had been thinking so many of the earth's species are being squeezed out of habit I wonder what will happen in the long run - I was hoping cities built upwards to the sky to free up land for other species (this makes me think of Brave New World for some reason but I know when that book was written our population was much smaller). I always thought if anything really went wrong though the next species to evolve and take over the planet would be from the crows - they're pretty smart you know. They have been called the bird of Zen -(local art gallery I visit).

Well - bye, I was surprised to see this board still open.
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vivico1
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seattle1 wrote:
What an interesting idea, Vivico. I wouldn't think it would change waterways and constructions like the Great Wall of China. I can imagine how all the bodies might clog waterways and highways for a while until they decompose or maybe changes wrought by accidents as ships crash into waterway boundaries as their navigators die but I would think Man's constructs would remain otherwise. Funny, I had been thinking back to the first (original) Star Trek movie with V_ger's mechanical voice explaining it was heading to earth to get rid of the carbon infestations (us) which had over run the planet. I have read/heard that current humans are descended from a small population that survived some mega disaster and then re-populated the earth. It would be sad if there wasn't another small population to start over again in the scenario above. I had been thinking so many of the earth's species are being squeezed out of habit I wonder what will happen in the long run - I was hoping cities built upwards to the sky to free up land for other species (this makes me think of Brave New World for some reason but I know when that book was written our population was much smaller). I always thought if anything really went wrong though the next species to evolve and take over the planet would be from the crows - they're pretty smart you know. They have been called the bird of Zen -(local art gallery I visit).

Well - bye, I was surprised to see this board still open.


Earth would reclaim the land quicker than you would think and man's building would be overrun with vegetation and soon crumble. Nothing would be rebuilt in places of earthquakes and fires and hurricanes, like we constantly do now. I heard that even now, the Great Wall of China is always being worked on because its more fragile now than people think. Waterways would change as forest grow uninhibited. Man made lakes would change. The ozone would start to repair itself meaning a change in global climate thus bringing about more changes in land and sea features. Animal life would change because the annihilation of species by man would stop but so would the control of other species. Feeding grounds would change, migration patterns would change when the landscapes that was were, start to return and forest homes to so many animals are no longer being destroyed at astronomical rates like they are now. Everything would change. It would not be some sci fi movie where some civilization comes from another world and finds well groomed cities still here, just no humans. I may have to find that book and see what he writes about all this.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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suetu
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎08-10-2007
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Re: Pssst!



vivico1 wrote:
To Jim, if you are still around :smileywink: and everyone who might be interested. On the Today Show this morning on NBC was an interview with some guy who wrote a book called: If Humans Disappeared: The World Without Us. I didnt get his name but its about what would happen to the earth if something killed off all human life. What would happen to all the things man has made from Urban Cities to the Great Wall of China? How long would it take mother earth to reclaim it all and would it change the geography and waterways of the whole world? Sounds like it might be interesting so given some of the things we talked about in here, I thought I would let you know about it. Vivian




Vivian,

I am reading that book now, and enjoying it immensely! (And, yes, I recommended it to Jimbo as soon as I picked it up.) It's a really fascinating read. The author has really considered every implication of human habitation of this planet, and in discussing a post-human earth, he looks at everything that might happen within the first few days, weeks, months, years, decades, centuries, milennia, and far, far beyond in erasing our existence. The scope of what he covers is truly impressive.

I was fascinated by what would start happening to Manhattan almost immediately without human maintenance. Likewise, by the fact that it might take 100,000 years for our atmosphere to absorb all the exces CO2 we've put into it.

Weisman also talks about how things might have been if there never were human at all. For instance, all those large mammals that used to roam North America might still be around. Africa has five mammals over a ton today. If they hadn't gone extinct (been hunted to extinction?) North America would have 15! Mammoths and saber-toothed tigers, huge lions and bears. Most of all, I would have loved to see the absolutely enormous giant ground sloth. They were way bigger than mammoths! By the time I finished that chapter, I was honestly mourning all these lost animals.

If you're a science geek like me, I'd highly recommend this book!
Susan
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vivico1
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suetu wrote:


vivico1 wrote:
To Jim, if you are still around :smileywink: and everyone who might be interested. On the Today Show this morning on NBC was an interview with some guy who wrote a book called: If Humans Disappeared: The World Without Us. I didnt get his name but its about what would happen to the earth if something killed off all human life. What would happen to all the things man has made from Urban Cities to the Great Wall of China? How long would it take mother earth to reclaim it all and would it change the geography and waterways of the whole world? Sounds like it might be interesting so given some of the things we talked about in here, I thought I would let you know about it. Vivian




Vivian,

I am reading that book now, and enjoying it immensely! (And, yes, I recommended it to Jimbo as soon as I picked it up.) It's a really fascinating read. The author has really considered every implication of human habitation of this planet, and in discussing a post-human earth, he looks at everything that might happen within the first few days, weeks, months, years, decades, centuries, milennia, and far, far beyond in erasing our existence. The scope of what he covers is truly impressive.

I was fascinated by what would start happening to Manhattan almost immediately without human maintenance. Likewise, by the fact that it might take 100,000 years for our atmosphere to absorb all the exces CO2 we've put into it.

Weisman also talks about how things might have been if there never were human at all. For instance, all those large mammals that used to roam North America might still be around. Africa has five mammals over a ton today. If they hadn't gone extinct (been hunted to extinction?) North America would have 15! Mammoths and saber-toothed tigers, huge lions and bears. Most of all, I would have loved to see the absolutely enormous giant ground sloth. They were way bigger than mammoths! By the time I finished that chapter, I was honestly mourning all these lost animals.

If you're a science geek like me, I'd highly recommend this book!


Thanks Susan, yes I am a science geek, freak and all the other things lol. Science was my favorite subject in school and sci-fiction my favorite pastime reading and movies. What was, what is and the "what ifs" are utterly fascinating to me.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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