Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Welcome from your moderator

This promises to be an exciting adventure for all of this, as we try to read a classic alongside an exciting new reinvention. I'll be proposing some topics for the discussion of Huck Finn, in consultation with John Clinch, the author of Finn, and then adding my insights as a contributor to the second half of the discussion, as it moves to focus more in on Finn. I'll let you all know that I deeply love Twain's novel, and can recall long passages that made my life as a reader of American literature, so I, like most of you, have a deep stake in seeing the life story of Huck's unforgettable father finally told.
Frequent Contributor
JesseBC
Posts: 278
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator

Yea! Fan is here! Cool!

Say, since you're here, I can ask you -- what's going on with The Jungle boards? I thought the idea of the new forums was that the conversations would continue beyond the designated month. Yet I seem to be all by myself over there. I was really hoping to pick your brain further on the later parts of the book. Are you coming back?





fanuzzir wrote:
This promises to be an exciting adventure for all of this, as we try to read a classic alongside an exciting new reinvention. I'll be proposing some topics for the discussion of Huck Finn, in consultation with John Clinch, the author of Finn, and then adding my insights as a contributor to the second half of the discussion, as it moves to focus more in on Finn. I'll let you all know that I deeply love Twain's novel, and can recall long passages that made my life as a reader of American literature, so I, like most of you, have a deep stake in seeing the life story of Huck's unforgettable father finally told.


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

how long discussions last



JesseBC wrote: I thought the idea of the new forums was that the conversations would continue beyond the designated month. Yet I seem to be all by myself over there.




I am also uncertain about that (in connection to other books) and will bring the subject over to the help board to ask the admins under the same headline.

ziki
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator/question

Thanks for the welcome, Bob.

"You don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer".(AOHF, chapter 1)
So begins the narration. And I wonder: is it recommendable or necessary to read T.Sawyer first or can AOFH be read as a separate book without loosing too much continuity? I think I read both books as a kid but contrary to many others I do not remember many details.

thanks
ziki
Frequent Contributor
JesseBC
Posts: 278
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator/question

I'd say Huck Finn can be read separately. Especially if you've read Tom Sawyer in the past or know even the simplest things about the story. I read them both has a kid and now I'm re-reading Huck Finn by itself and I haven't had any trouble with that. The references to Tom Sawyer will probably come back you, but, even if they don't, it's not a big deal.





ziki wrote:
Thanks for the welcome, Bob.

"You don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer".(AOHF, chapter 1)
So begins the narration. And I wonder: is it recommendable or necessary to read T.Sawyer first or can AOFH be read as a separate book without loosing too much continuity? I think I read both books as a kid but contrary to many others I do not remember many details.

thanks
ziki


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

j

Thanks Jesse :-)
ziki
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator

Hey Jesse, yea I'll be back at the Jungle to get my brain picked. The arrangement is: the featured discussion is supposed to last a month, which means the Jungle was no longer featured as of early Feb. It's still there, though, to let people go back and carry on, shall we say, smaller discussions of uniquely motivated people. I'm still going back to Moby Dick, and that was supposed to end officially in late January but it just can't be killed. So whatever shows up with a picture on the Book Clubs site is usually the one they have featured (Huck for March; Walden for April). But if you go back to the original classic board, you'll see a Whitman discussion gaining steam, and that was "supposed" to be finished in November 07! (You can also use that all purpose board to start any random discussion you want.)
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator/question



JesseBC wrote:
I'd say Huck Finn can be read separately. Especially if you've read Tom Sawyer in the past or know even the simplest things about the story. I read them both has a kid and now I'm re-reading Huck Finn by itself and I haven't had any trouble with that. The references to Tom Sawyer will probably come back you, but, even if they don't, it's not a big deal.





ziki wrote:
Thanks for the welcome, Bob.

"You don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer".(AOHF, chapter 1)
So begins the narration. And I wonder: is it recommendable or necessary to read T.Sawyer first or can AOFH be read as a separate book without loosing too much continuity? I think I read both books as a kid but contrary to many others I do not remember many details.

thanks
ziki







I'd actually recommend against reading Tom Sawyer unless you are utterly unfamiliar with the plot and the characters. There are some similar characters and plots and settings, but it is told with much more of an affectionate regard for the permanence of home-town life and middle class family values. Twain savagely turns against these in Huck Finn.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator



fanuzzir wrote:
Hey Jesse, yea I'll be back at the Jungle to get my brain picked. The arrangement is: the featured discussion is supposed to last a month, which means the Jungle was no longer featured as of early Feb. It's still there, though, to let people go back and carry on, shall we say, smaller discussions of uniquely motivated people. I'm still going back to Moby Dick, and that was supposed to end officially in late January but it just can't be killed. So whatever shows up with a picture on the Book Clubs site is usually the one they have featured (Huck for March; Walden for April). But if you go back to the original classic board, you'll see a Whitman discussion gaining steam, and that was "supposed" to be finished in November 07! (You can also use that all purpose board to start any random discussion you want.)


IOW we keep you busy, Bob.
:-) ziki
Ljo
New User
Ljo
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-03-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator

I just signed up this weekend and look forward to getting involved. I haven't picked up Finn yet, but hope to yet this week. I am a Twain fan, and classics fan overall. But this month I may be somewhat quiet as I get a feel for this on-line type clubbing. I was hoping to find a face-to-face group but they seem to be a rarity. So I enjoy a chat and book-sharing line or two while at my local Barnes and Noble, and opt to delve into the on-line era of book clubs. Look forward to a fun, insightful experience.
Ljo
LJ Green
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome from your moderator

Hi Ljo, and welcome to the club. I hope you pipe up every now and then. I'm laying out some threads that correspond to sections of the novel so that everyone will see a place to jump in, but there are also thematic discussions to join whether you have read up to a certain point or even if you have not started at all!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

another attitude



fanuzzir wrote:... There are some similar characters and plots and settings, but it is told with much more of an affectionate regard for the permanence of home-town life and middle class family values. Twain savagely turns against these in Huck Finn.



Do we know why he did that?

ziki
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: another attitude



ziki wrote:


fanuzzir wrote:... There are some similar characters and plots and settings, but it is told with much more of an affectionate regard for the permanence of home-town life and middle class family values. Twain savagely turns against these in Huck Finn.



Do we know why he did that?

ziki


Yes, we kind of do, with more accuracy than we would be able to claim with respect to most artistic decisions. Twain was not only a faithful letter writer but a good documentarian of his own artistic process. A memorable description of Huck Finn was that it represented a war between a sound heart and a guilty conscience and that conscience suffered a defeat. Sounds like we should be looking into Twain's personal and literary baggage, as we have done with other writers.
Users Online
Currently online: 4 members 417 guests
Recent logins:
Please welcome our newest community members: