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classics & spin-off books

[ Edited ]
I wonder what spin-off books you read and what did you think?

I start with Dr Jekyll&Mr Hyde and Mary Reilly by Valerie Martin, which I liked.
Then On Moby-Dick there were several books exploring Ahab's wife. Those I didn't read yet so I can't say much.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-04-200706:51 PM

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BenB
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Re: classics & spin-off books

My school librarian and I were talking about this just this morning. I remember reading "Grendel" when I taught "Beowulf." He also told me there are a couple books from the witch's point of view in "Wizard of Oz."

Are there any more?

B
jd
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jd
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Re: classics & spin-off books

I have read the sequel to gone with the wind, which was a parody and amusing. I have read several others and generally enjoy them as a piece of fiction. But am I the only one who does not expect the sequel or prequel to be a continuation of the original? It is what it is by another author. I got tired of the movie Rocky 1-10 because it was so knitted together. After #2 there was nothing fresh. It is not like Nancy Drew books or the Hardy boys. Perhaps I am too harsh but I am looking forward to the rest of the story so to speak from a different angle, jd
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Re: classics & spin-off books



BenB wrote:
My school librarian and I were talking about this just this morning. I remember reading "Grendel" when I taught "Beowulf." He also told me there are a couple books from the witch's point of view in "Wizard of Oz."

Are there any more?

B


There is a wonderful book written about the Three Little Pigs tale from the wolf's point of view, The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. Reminds me of many of the politicians memoirs we are gifted with.
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jonclinch
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Re: classics & spin-off books

Don't forget Geraldine Brooks' March, which won her a Pulitzer. And Jean Rhys Wide Sargasso Sea...
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Re: classics & spin-off books



BenB wrote:He also told me there are a couple books from the witch's point of view in "Wizard of Oz."



Right; I heard about that one but never got to it.
ziki
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Re: classics & spin-off books


jonclinch wrote:
Don't forget Geraldine Brooks' March, which won her a Pulitzer.




Right, I just got it a couple of days ago, finally. That's Alcott: Little Women

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780143036661&itm=1

ziki
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Re: classics & spin-off books



jd wrote:
I have read the sequel to gone with the wind, which was a parody and amusing. I have read several others and generally enjoy them as a piece of fiction. But am I the only one who does not expect the sequel or prequel to be a continuation of the original? It is what it is by another author. I got tired of the movie Rocky 1-10 because it was so knitted together. After #2 there was nothing fresh. It is not like Nancy Drew books or the Hardy boys. Perhaps I am too harsh but I am looking forward to the rest of the story so to speak from a different angle, jd




For me it provides another angle, it picks up some thread but I do not expect anything of it.

ziki
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larryk
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Re: classics & spin-off books



ziki wrote:
I wonder what spin-off books you read and what did you think?

I start with Dr Jekyll&Mr Hyde and Mary Reilly by Valerie Martin, which I liked.
Then On Moby-Dick there were several books exploring Ahab's wife. Those I didn't read yet so I can't say much.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-04-200706:51 PM




I've read, and heard of many worthy sequel/spin-offs.

In fact this past spring I had a novel released, titled A SMALL HARVEST OF PRETTY DAYS that's categorized as a Literary effort, and as a unique sequel to THE ADVENTURE OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN. It's selling well in central Pennsylvania, as well as in central NJ. Several newspapers have written wonderful reviews.

In my this tale, Finn is 50 years old. He has forsaken his own name, and at long last last he is falling in love. Ending a lifetime of wandering.

More information on my novel and myself can be found at the publisher's website:

http://foremostpress.com/readers/kimport_l/harvest.html
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