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TiggerBear
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Re: APRIL - Spring

 

dulcinea3 wrote:


 

I also have a New Favorite.  It seems to come as a Bush or a Tree, but I am not sure what it is called.  I think it is a type of Cherry, and it has Burgundy Leaves and Branches.  I think this might be a Photo of one, although I'm not sure:

Click to view full size image

 

Does anyone know what I mean?  If I knew what it was called, I could find more Photos, and could order some to be Planted around my Palace.

 

 

Flowering Cherry. Produces no fruit. But oh the blossoms.

 

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KathyS
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APRIL - Lavender Shortbread Cookies

Be daring.  Try these!

 

Because I have English Lavender all around the castle, I thought this might make a pretty addition to our culinary table.  Can be cut into any shape.  Serve with a cup of tea!

 

Lavender Shortbread Cookies - 2 Doz.

 

Lavender Shortbread Cookies Recipe

 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups butter, softened
  • 2/3 cup white sugar
  • 1/4 cup sifted confectioners' sugar
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh lavender
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
Directions
  1. In a medium bowl, cream together the butter, white sugar and confectioners' sugar until light and fluffy. Mix in the lavender, mint and lemon zest. Combine the flour, cornstarch and salt; mix into the batter until well blended. Divide dough into two balls, wrap in plastic wrap and flatten to about 1inch thick. Refrigerate until firm, about 1hour.
  2. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes with cookie cutters. Cookie stamps will work well on these too. Place on cookie sheets.
  3. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes in the preheated oven, just until cookies begin to brown at the edges. Cool for a few minutes on the baking sheets then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.
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crzynwrd4lf
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Re: APRIL - Spring

Field of daisies

 

Laying in a field of daisies!

"One potato, two potato, three potato, four/ she's coming for you now, you better lock the door"-- Promise Not To Tell
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dulcinea3
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Re: APRIL - Spring

TiggerBear wrote:

 

dulcinea3 wrote:


 

I also have a New Favorite.  It seems to come as a Bush or a Tree, but I am not sure what it is called.  I think it is a type of Cherry, and it has Burgundy Leaves and Branches.  I think this might be a Photo of one, although I'm not sure:

Click to view full size image

 

Does anyone know what I mean?  If I knew what it was called, I could find more Photos, and could order some to be Planted around my Palace.

 

 

Flowering Cherry. Produces no fruit. But oh the blossoms.

 

Thanks, Tigger!  My mother has a Japanese Cherry tree that looks like this:

Beautiful big double flowers that are so heavy they hang down!  No burgundy leaves, though, which makes such a beautiful contrast with the delicate small pink blossoms on these ones that I have been seeing around lately.  Too bad I have a condo and no control over the plantings!  They had the bushes for sale at the grocery store last year.

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KathyS
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APRIL - Ornamental Plum Tree

Ornamental plum trees are rather nice.

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
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Re: APRIL - Spring

[ Edited ]

 

dulcinea3 wrote:


Thanks, Tigger!  My mother has a Japanese Cherry tree that looks like this:

Beautiful big double flowers that are so heavy they hang down!  No burgundy leaves, though, which makes such a beautiful contrast with the delicate small pink blossoms on these ones that I have been seeing around lately.  Too bad I have a condo and no control over the plantings!  They had the bushes for sale at the grocery store last year.

 

 

The Kwanzan cherry tree outside my kitchen window is in full bloom for this year's season.  It is what I look at as I sit at my PC in the dining nook.  Now if I could write poetry:

 

Heavy double blooms

Pink, oh, so pretty, pretty

A Kwanzan cherry

 

Pepper

 

Oh, tears!  The week has been too short.  The rain has just arrived and it is raining pink petals as I look outside.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Arbor Day

[ Edited ]

Since it is also Poetry Month:

 

We all probably came in contact with Joyce Kilmer's "Trees" at some point in our education cycles.

 

TREES

by: Joyce Kilmer (1886-1918)

  •  

THINK that I shall never see

A poem lovely as a tree.  

 

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest

Against the earth's sweet flowing breast;  

 

A tree that may in Summer wear

A nest of robins in her hair;  


(excerpts)

 

Here is an interesting site on Kilmer, apparently created and maintained by his granddaughter.

 

Ryan_G wrote:

Let's not forget one of my favorite days in the month of April.  The last Friday of the month is national Arbor Day.  I would like those of us in the Kingdom to celebrat this month.  I'm open to ideas on how we should do it.  Maybe plant a Royal Woods with all our favorite trees or have a haiku contest or maybe even a log rolling contest.  Either way we should all be planting a tree on that day.

 

 

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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KathyS
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APRIL CALENDAR - San Jacinto Day

April 21 is San Jacinto Day

 
 
Spectators watch the battle reenactment at the festival.
 
 

San Jacinto Day is the celebration of the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836. It was the final battle of the Texas Revolution where Texas won its independence from Mexico.

 

 

It is an official holiday according to the State of Texas. An annual festival, which includes a reenactment, is held on the site of the battle. The Sabine Volunteers, a reenactment group from East Texas, participate in the San Jacinto Reenactment annually. This group is named for an actual militia group during the Texas Revolution. The reenactment group consists of four members and has appeared on the History Channel.

 

 

See alsoExternal links
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KathyS
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APRIL- Texian - Mexican War

 

The Texas Revolution or Texas War of Independence was a military conflict between Mexico and settlers in the Texas portion of the Mexican state Coahuila y Tejas. The war lasted from October 2, 1835 to April 21, 1836. However, a war at sea between Mexico and Texas would continue into the 1840s. Animosity between the Mexican government and the American settlers in Texas (who were called Texians), as well as many Texas residents of Mexican ancestry, began with the Siete Leyes of 1835, when Mexican President and General Antonio López de Santa Anna abolished the Constitution of 1824 and proclaimed a new anti-federalist constitution in its place.

 

The new laws were unpopular throughout Mexico, leading to violence in several states. War began in Texas on October 2, 1835, with the Battle of Gonzales. Early Texian successes at La Bahia and San Antonio were soon met with crushing defeat at the same locations a few months later. The war ended at the Battle of San Jacinto where General Sam Houston led the Texian Army to victory over a portion of the Mexican Army under Santa Anna, who was captured shortly after the battle. The conclusion of the war resulted in the creation of the Republic of Texas in 1836.

 
 Background

The Mexican War for Independence severed control that Spain had exercised on its North American territories, and the new country of Mexico was formed from much of the individual territory that had comprised New Spain.

 

 On October 4, 1824, Mexico adopted a new constitution which defined the country as a federal republic with nineteen states and four territories. The former province of Spanish Texas became part of a newly created state, Coahuila y Tejas whose capital was at Saltillo, hundreds of miles from the former Texas capital, San Antonio de Bexar (now San Antonio, Texas)

 

The new country emerged from the war essentially bankrupt. With little money for the military, Mexico encouraged settlers to create their own militias for protection against hostile Indian tribes. Texas was very sparsely populated and in the hope that an influx of settlers could control the Indian raids, the government liberalized immigration policies for the region.

 

The first group of colonists, known as the Old Three Hundred, arrived in 1822 to settle an empresarial grant that had been given to Stephen F. Austin. Of the 24 empresarios, only one settled citizens from within the Mexican interior; most of the remaining settlers came from the United States.

  

The Mexican-born settlers in Texas were soon vastly outnumbered by people born in the United States. To address this situation, President Anastasio Bustamante implemented several measures on April 6, 1830. Chief among these was a prohibition against further immigration to Texas from the United States, although American citizens would be allowed to settle in other parts of Mexico. Furthermore, the property tax law, intended to exempt immigrants from paying taxes for ten years, was rescinded, and tariffs were increased on goods shipped from the United States. Bustamante also ordered Texas settlers to comply with the federal prohibition against slavery or face military intervention. These measures did not have the intended effect. Settlers simply circumvented or ignored the laws.

 

 

By 1834, it was estimated that over 30,000 Anglos (short for anglophones, people whose first language is English) lived in Texas,compared to only 7,800 Mexican-born citizens. By 1836, there were approximately 5,000 slaves in Texas.

Sam Houston

Texians were becoming increasingly disillusioned with the Mexican government. Many of the Mexican soldiers garrisoned in Texas were convicted criminals who were given the choice of prison or serving in the army in Texas. Many Texians were also unhappy with the location of their state capital, which moved periodically between Saltillo and Monclova, both of which were in southern Coahuila, some 500 miles (800 km) away; they wanted Texas to be a separate state from Coahuila (but not independent from Mexico) and to have its own capital.

 

 

Some American immigrants and Mexican citizens were accustomed to the rights they had in the U.S. that they did not have in Mexico. For example, Mexico did not protect Freedom of Religion, instead requiring colonists to pledge their acceptance of Roman Catholicism; Mexican Law required a tithe paid to the Catholic Church[citation needed]. In the Mexican interior, violence began to erupt between those who supported federalism and those who wanted a centralized government.

 

 

 Economic origin of conflict

Cotton was in high demand throughout Europe and most farmers in United States focused on cotton. This was the focus of the Texians too, who wanted to raise cotton for big profits. But Mexico government demanded that the Texians produce corn, grain and beef, dictating which crops each Texian settler would plant and harvest.

The other interest of the Texians was representation of their interests in the government. They believed a closer location for the capital would help to stem corruption and facilitate other matters of government. Texians continued to lobby to overturn the laws of 1830. In April 1833, settlers called a convention to discuss proposed changes in immigration, judicial, and other political policies. The delegates also advocated separate statehood for Texas and elected Austin to carry a proposed state constitution to Mexico City. The new Mexican President, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, approved many of the proposals, but refused to agree to separate statehood; Austin was jailed when he wrote a letter advocating that Texians act unilaterally on statehood.

 

 The number of American immigrants entering Texas quickly escalated. Santa Anna believed that the influx of American immigrants to Texas was part of a plot by the U.S. to take over the region. In 1834, because of perceived troubles within the Mexican government, Santa Anna went through a process of dissolving state legislatures, disarming state militias, and abolishing the Constitution of 1824. He also imprisoned some cotton plantation owners who refused to raise their assigned crops, which were intended to be redistributed within Mexico instead of being exported. These actions triggered outrage throughout Mexico.

 

Belligerents Commanders Strength Casualties and losses
Previous flag of Texas.svgRepublic of Texas
Tejano volenteers
 Republic of Yucatán
 Mexico
Stephen F. Austin
Edward Burleson
Sam Houston
Antonio López de Santa Anna
Martin Perfecto de Cos
Jose de Urrea
c. 2,000c. 6,500
c. 700c. 1,500

 

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KathyS
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APRIL CALENDAR - Celebrate Arbor Day!

How to Celebrate Arbor Day

Arbor Day Celebration

It has been over 135 years since J. Sterling Morton founded Arbor Day. His simple idea of setting aside a special day for tree planting is now more important than ever.

Discover ideas on how to celebrate Arbor Day in your community.

Download Our Celebrate Arbor Day Guidebook

An Arbor Day celebration can be as large or as small as you want to make it. Your Arbor Day can be a few neighbors gathering to plant trees in a park behind your homes or at a nearby school. It can be a week-long regional festival with activities for thousands of kids and adults. Arbor Day can be a single class project or an event for the whole school, an inner city neighborhood planting trees in a vacant lot, or a huge citywide or statewide celebration.

Our Celebrate Arbor Day Guidebook shows you a smorgasbord of possibilities. Pick and choose what makes sense for you. This PDF is available for free download for the first time ever (12.7 MBs).

 

 

Celebration Ideas Group Celebrations

  • Raise the flag, strike up the band, make Arbor Day fun. Make it memorable.
  • Organize a beautification project in a public area.
  • Get people into action. Ask a civic or service group to promote a paper drive to gather paper to be recycled and save a tree. Use the proceeds to buy a special tree to plant in a park or other special public place.
  • Hold a poster contest, or a poetry contest.
  • Sponsor a children’s pageant or play.
  • Fill the air with music. Have an Arbor Day concert of songs about trees, or with tree names in their titles.
  • Sponsor a tree trivia contest. Give away trees to winners.
  • Conduct a tree search. Ask people to find large, unusual or historic trees in your community. Once the results are in, publish a map that highlights the winners, or hold a walk showcasing them.
  • Tell people to take a hike — a tree identification hike — and have girl scouts or boy scouts act as guides.
  • Dedicate a forest, or a tree, or a flower bed in a park, and make it an occasion to talk about stewardship. Get a local nursery or garden center to hold an open house or field day. Organize an Arbor Day Fair.
  • Encourage neighborhood organizations to hold block parties and get their members to adopt and care for street trees in front of their homes. Pass out buttons. Give away trees.

Individual Arbor Day Celebration

Individual Celebration

  • Celebrate Arbor Day in a personal way by planting a tree yourself. It is an act of optimism and kindness, a labor of love and a commitment to stewardship.
  • Read a book about trees. Learn to identify trees in your yard and neighborhood.
  • Enjoy the outdoors. Visit a local park or take a nature hike.
  • Attend a class on tree and plant care.
  • Volunteer with a local tree-planting organization. You’ll meet new people and make a difference in your community.
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APRIL CALENDAR - Arbor Day History

History

 

 

 

 

 

Arbor Day, the tree planters' holiday, has its roots in Nebraska.  The story began in 1855 when the 23-year-old J. Sterling Morton and his bride Caroline moved to a 160-acre claim near Nebraska City, in southeastern Nebraska.

 

 

The Mortons, like many settlers before and after them, missed the forests and lush vegetation of the east.  Before long, the Mortons began planting; trees, shrubs and even an apple orchard graced their claim by 1858.

 

 

Morton realized that the plains, though treeless, had a climate and soil favorable to tree growth.  The settlers in the new territory were sorely in need of trees for building homes, fences and farm buildings.  They needed trees for fuel and for windbreaks.  In his newspaper, Morton often wrote about the trees best suited to the plains, encouraging the pioneers to plant trees on their homesteads.

 

 

In 1872 Morton, who was then a member of the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture, proposed that a day be set aside annually for tree planting.

 

 

Part of Morton's resolution stated that $100 would be awarded to the county which properly planted the largest number of trees, and a farm library with $25 would be awarded to the individual who did the same.

 

 

The first statewide Arbor Day in 1872 was a huge success -- over one million trees were planted in a single day.

 

 

Shortly after this first observance, other states passed legislation to observe Arbor Day each year.  Kansas and Tennessee passed resolution sin 1875 (Arkansas passed a resolution in 1973).  In 1885, the Nebraska Legislature made Morton's birthday, April 22, the official Arbor Day date in Nebraska.

 

 

Morton had a chance to see his holiday become successful in many states.  In 1882, the first American Forestry Congress sponsored a tree planting ceremony before 50,000 people in Cincinnati.

 

 

By 1920, more than 45 states and territorial possessions were celebrating Arbor Day.  Although several U.S. Presidents have proclaimed National Arbor Day in April (most recently President Nixon, in 1972, the 100th anniversary of Arbor Day), many states continue to celebrate the holiday at different times.  Differing climates in such a large country makes planting time vary from January and February in the South to May and June in the most northerly states.  States often observe Arbor Day on the last Friday of April with programs emphasizing the ideals of trees; while doing the actual planting on the state Arbor Day.

 

 

Morton died in 1902 and a memorial to him at his home, Arbor Lodge, was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1905.  One of Morton's own phrases adorns the marker, "Other holidays repose upon the past - Arbor Day proposes for the future.

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KathyS
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APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

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dulcinea3
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

[ Edited ]

I chose a Japanese Maple.

 

So colorful in the spring!

 

I was also remembering back to when I was a child in New Jersey.  Many people had trees that had little orange berries on them, which I no longer saw once we moved to Massachusetts, but I never knew what they were.  Does anybody know what I'm talking about?

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
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KathyS
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

Dulci, I love the Japanese Maple!  I think they are one of my favorites.  TiggerBear could probably answer your question about the "berry tree"... :smileyhappy:

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TiggerBear
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

 

dulcinea3 wrote:

I chose a Japanese Maple.

 

So colorful in the spring!

 

I was also remembering back to when I was a child in New Jersey.  Many people had trees that had little orange berries on them, which I no longer saw once we moved to Massachusetts, but I never knew what they were.  Does anybody know what I'm talking about?

 

 

Hmm I need more info, did the birds eat them or did humans fight the birds for them? That would tell me if it was an evergreen holly family (most likely) or  a persimmon tree.

 

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dulcinea3
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

So you're from New Jersey, Tigger?  For some reason, I thought you were down South.

 

I think I've found the tree - it is apparently a Rowan or Mountain Ash (although that term is used incorrectly, as it is not really an ash):

 

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
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TiggerBear
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

 

dulcinea3 wrote:

So you're from New Jersey, Tigger?  For some reason, I thought you were down South.

 

I think I've found the tree - it is apparently a Rowan or Mountain Ash (although that term is used incorrectly, as it is not really an ash):

 

 

No I'm from the south, but a keen interest in east coast plants. Ah Rowan is commonly mislabeled a shortening of the phrase Rowan, Ash, Oak, and Thorn to the phrase Ash, Oak, and Thorn. Somewhere down the line I think someone thought they were the same plant. Hmm nice variety of it you have there, it's usually a yellow off white colored berry further south. Oh and it is the poisonous bird eat only berries.

 

 

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dulcinea3
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

[ Edited ]

Interesting that the berries are different colors in different areas.  I remember them being fairly common as a decorative tree in people's yards when I was little, and the berries are very colorful and festive.  I have missed them, since I never see them up here in MA.

 

Kind of like the massive tulip trees in our yard during the few years we lived in MD, which don't grow up here.

 

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
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TiggerBear
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

 

dulcinea3 wrote:

Interesting that the berries are different colors in different areas.  I remember them being fairly common as a decorative tree in people's yards when I was little, and the berries are very colorful and festive.  I have missed them, since I never see them up here in MA.

 

I've seen that saffron orange, yellow, yellow off white, green off white, red, and white ones. Could be soil differences or temperature adaptation. More than my above causal knowledge level. :smileyhappy:  Wonder if you saw one with different shaded berries and merely thought it was a different plant.

 

 

Reminds me of the time I had to explain that there was such a critter as a spotted skunk to a hiker describing this cute thing she shared lunch with.

 

 

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dulcinea3
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Re: APRIL Plant your tree, here, for Arbor Day!

TiggerBear wrote:

 

dulcinea3 wrote:

Interesting that the berries are different colors in different areas.  I remember them being fairly common as a decorative tree in people's yards when I was little, and the berries are very colorful and festive.  I have missed them, since I never see them up here in MA.

 

I've seen that saffron orange, yellow, yellow off white, green off white, red, and white ones. Could be soil differences or temperature adaptation. More than my above causal knowledge level. :smileyhappy:  Wonder if you saw one with different shaded berries and merely thought it was a different plant.

 

 

Reminds me of the time I had to explain that there was such a critter as a spotted skunk to a hiker describing this cute thing she shared lunch with.

 

 

 

I don't think I've seen them around here, because those leaves are rather distinctive, too.  But I will try and be on the look-out, just in case!

 

Spotted skunk! :smileysurprised: Never seen one of those!

 

 

Well, it is cute...

 

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia