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KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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All join in celebrating this month, in the form of a Haiku

[ Edited ]

This month we have Earth Day, and National Arbor Day. 

 

All board participants are welcome to join The Kingdom of Wordsmithonia, by composing your thoughts in the form of a Haiku (as many as you care to write), here in this thread, telling us what this wonderful time of year means to you.   

Thank you for your participation. 

 

Kathy S.

Queen Mother

Duchy of Highland Palms

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Celebrating this month, in the form of a Haiku

As some of you may wonder, why a Haiku?   Why should we express ourselves in this way? Or what does a Haiku mean?  And what does it mean to this board?  And why is it part of this celebration?

 

In writing Haiku,  this explanation I give, I hope will help those of you who are not familiar with this type of writing, or may not be familiar with this board.

 

I've tried to give explanations for this board, or the purpose in having this board, but I think that the Haiku form of writing defines why this board exists.  We are a board made up of words in many forms.  Whether real or make-believe, we use words to convey these thoughts of ours.  Here is an example I'll give you of what I mean.  I will also post the more extensive definition of a Haiku, and it's meanings.

 

 

Haiku Purpose: Why Bother Writing Haiku?

Haiku also has purpose: communication and awareness. Along with other forms of writing and poetry, it is a vehicle for conveying feelings, sentiments, impressions, perceptions to other persons.

Haiku writing is a form of meditation, starting with an intensification of 'noticing' what is going on in the everyday world, followed by the practice of mental writing--creating haiku in the mind and playing with the form and rhythm until it feels right--and finally putting the haiku to pen and paper - writing and rewriting the haiku.

 

 

I wrote the following haiku after a walk in river valley near my home. the stream was flowing slowly and noiselessly, the birds were quiet, the breeze was too slight to make a sound in the leaves, and suddenly a mallard called to his mate with that sound that is so unique to mallards.

midday hush
the rasp of a mallard
calling his mate

Ray Rasmussen
published in Heron's Nest, 2004

 

A key point if you are interested in starting to write haiku poetry is to make a decision about the form you will practice, how often you will practice and whether you will seek instruction or companionship in your haiku journey. These are the subjects of the links “getting started” and “haiku clubs”.

If you would like to learn more about the definition of English Language haiku, simply search the internet with the key terms: Haiku, definition, and you will find numerous references. If you don't find them, add the names George Swede or Jane Reichhold to your search terms. In addition, visit the pages of the World Haiku Club which has excellent resources on haiku and haiku related poetry.

~ Ray Rasmussen ~

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Haiku - A Definition

Haiku - A Definition

Many gifted English haiku poets have written definitions of the English form of haiku. The definition below is derived directly from the definitions that I have read and from my own limited experience in writing and reading haiku.

Haiku is a minimalist form of poetry. The writer has 17 or fewer syllables through which to convey an experience. Here's an example of a translation of one of the Japanese Master Issa's haiku. In English, it has 9 syllables.

reed warblers
sing the great river
still

Issa

Since the early 1900s, there has been a great increase in the number of English language haiku poets [or haijin, to use the Japanese term]. Because English is so different than the Japanese language, and because so few people now live in 'pure nature' the English form has evolved in its own way. When you read about haiku elsewhere, you will learn that there is a good deal of controversy about what an English haiku is -- what it’s content may be and how it is formed.

 

 

 

Haiku Content:

The content of a haiku is typically, but not always, focused on what a person witnesses in everyday life that is more outstanding or important than normal, something deemed worth reaching for in written expression. The something can be auditory--a bird call, or visual--light glistening on water, or a human sentiment--a fleeting infatuation, or a memory associated with something seen, heard, felt. Some argue that a haiku must contain an obvious reference to a season and must be nature focused, but at least half the English language haijin do not have a nature focus. After all, for the most part we live in cities, not the rural Japan of several centuries ago when the haiku form was invented by a monk named Basho.

The content of a haiku might be about a everyday, but noticable event, or about an awe-inspiring experience, or about a transformational experience--an epiphany or special insight. Part of writing haiku is finding the 'awe' that is usually passed by without notice--the act of creating a haiku is the act of a focusing our attention more closely than we might otherwise do.

 

Haiku Form:

English-Language haiku is incorrectly said to have a prescribed form, three lines of 5-7-5 syllables and a seasonal reference. However, there is a great deal of debate about the form of English haiku and few agree that the 5-7-5 season reference form is the only acceptable form.

What then is the form of a haiku? Some of the critical aspects of haiku form that have been mentioned are:

  • brevity [one to three lines totaling 17 syllables or less]
  • three lines -- some would insist of 5-7-5 syllable structure, some suggest a structure of three lines with 5 or less, 7 or less, 5 or less syllables.
  • when read aloud, can be completed in one breadth
  • avoidance of traditional English poetic forms, such as rhyming and metaphor.
  • juxtaposition … two elements or lines of the haiku indirectly relate to a third.
  • descriptiveness ... haiku describe, they don't prescribe or tell.

 

Besides brevity, I have come to believe that the juxtapositional element of a haiku is one of its most important aspects. For example, Issa's haiku above might seem to simply be about birds singing and a river scene. However, rivers don't stand sill. So, what's going on? Of course, Issa can no longer speak for himself, and that leaves us to speculate. I think he meant that a bird song can make the world stand still--completely capturing our senses. I might be wrong, but that speaks to a critical aspect of a good haiku.

 

 

They encourage you to see the world differently, to think about what has been written.

~ Ray Rasmussen

Distinguished Wordsmith
crzynwrd4lf
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎04-04-2010

Re: All join in celebrating this month, in the form of a Haiku

Dew on the web

Catches the sun’s morning rays

Admire the spiders work

 

Kayla M. Goodenough

 

 

 

"One potato, two potato, three potato, four/ she's coming for you now, you better lock the door"-- Promise Not To Tell
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Haiku - Primary

Primary

 

Red strokes of living

Blue swirls run cold within it

Yellow lifts life to surface

 

K.S.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008

Re: Haiku - Trees

Trees

 

Magestic towers

reaching towards the azure sky,

giving breath and shade.

 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Spring Haiku

[ Edited ]

I'm sorry, but I am a traditionalist.  Haiku has three lines, of five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.

 

As the Kingdom's Poet Laureate, I Present two Spring Haiku:

 

 

Spring Joy

Joy of spring has sprung

Beautiful blossoms abound

I sigh to see them

 

 

First Signs

Outside my window

Crabapple tree and robin

Harbingers of spring

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Wordsmith
crzynwrd4lf
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎04-04-2010

Re: Spring Haiku

[ Edited ]

A few more haiku:

 

A Sign

Early blossoms bloom

Caught by the breeze and carried

Message for others

Rise and Shine

A bird’s song that wakes

The flowers and trees open

Embracing sunlight

 

Cleanse

Clouds passing slowly

The scent of rain on the breeze

Shower of freshness

 

 

--Kayla

"One potato, two potato, three potato, four/ she's coming for you now, you better lock the door"-- Promise Not To Tell
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Haiku - A Bug's Life

A Bug's Life

 

 

Ladybugs walking

leaves of green aphids thriving

bugs are surviving

 

K.S.

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Haiku - A Kwanzan Cherry, by Peppermill

Heavy double blooms

Pink, oh, so pretty, pretty

A Kwanzan cherry

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Haiku - Majesty Lives

Majesty Lives

 

Tall and proud this tree

Majestic it lives and grows

Sequoias on high

 

 

K.S.

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

In the form of a Haiku - May

[ Edited ]

Join us, in this month of May.

 

 

Love In Bloom

 

Rain bring us flowers

petals open upon May

give birth to love's light

 

K.S.

Frequent Contributor
largerthanlife
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎08-17-2007

Re: All join in celebrating this month, in the form of a Haiku

This is not exactly a fit for today since it was 82 and sunny in my beautiful home but it makes me smile.

 

 

 

 

Chocolate delights

And whip-cream makes all better

This cold, rainy day

"Look, would it save you a lot of time if I just gave up and went mad now?"
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Haiku - May

Sounds yummy to me, any time of the year!  :smileyhappy:  Very nice!  It's 80 where I live.  Where are you?

 

 

largerthanlife wrote:

This is not exactly a fit for today since it was 82 and sunny in my beautiful home but it makes me smile.

 

Chocolate delights

And whip-cream makes all better

This cold, rainy day

 

Frequent Contributor
largerthanlife
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎08-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Haiku - May

[ Edited ]

i reside in the very lovely, if rather annoying at times, California (i am of the northern variety-non of those pesky so-cal cities like LA for me).

"Look, would it save you a lot of time if I just gave up and went mad now?"
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Haiku - May

May Dance

On the green hillside

Maidens dance 'round the Maypole.

May - fertility!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Inspired Wordsmith
Morigami
Posts: 1,258
Registered: ‎01-23-2010

Re: Haiku - May

Flowers

The pedals bloom

The colors are so beautiful

The gaze is so bright


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