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KathyS
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Heading to Hoover Dam

On to Hoover Dam!

 

 

 

Construction began in 1931 and Hoover Dam was completed in 1936.It still stands tall as an engineering marvel high above the Colorado River between Arizona and Nevada. Hoover Dam attracts over 7 million visitors from around the new world every year feeding vast tourism into the Las Vegas Nevada and Arizona economy.

 

The building of Hoover Dam took the brilliance of over 200 engineers to pull-off what many deemed as almost impossible. And it was the fortitude of over 7,000 dam workers that endured amazingly harsh conditions and extreme dangers to complete Hoover Dam almost two years ahead of schedule. Read more about “Men, Women and Children of Hoover Dam”.

 

The mission of Hoover Dam was multi-purpose. Flooding along the Colorado River as it made its way to the Gulf of California had to be controlled. The water-flow had to be harnessed to provide much needed water to the fertile, yet arid agricultural areas of California and Arizona. And hydroelectric energy was to satisfy the requirements of millions and millions of people in adjacent regions.

 

Lake MeadA scenic by-product of Hoover Dam is the gigantic reservoir of Lake Mead, a stunningly beautiful water recreation wonderland. This boating, sailing, fishing and house-boating paradise attracts over 10 million visitors a year.

 

Lake Mead covers 550 miles of majestic shoreline and 247 square miles of area which is twice the size of Rhode Island. Its capacity of 1 1/4 trillion cubic feet of water would cover the entire state of Pennsylvania one foot deep.

 

But, back to Hoover Dam itself which is 726 feet tall and 1,244 feet long. At its base, Hoover Dam is 660 feet thick which is 60 feet longer than two football fields laid end-to-end. Combined with its top thickness of 45 feet, there is enough concrete (4.5 million cubic yards) in Hoover Dam to build a two-lane highway from Seattle Washington to Miami Florida. Or imagine a four-foot wide sidewalk around Earth at its equator.

 

An often asked question is how Hoover Dam can withstand the massive pressure and weight of Lake Mead which is constantly trying to flow down river to the Gulf of California. It’s answered briefly this way. Hoover Dam curves against Lake Mead and is fortified against the massive rock walls of Black Canyon. When the water compresses against the curved walls of Hoover Dam, the canyon walls push-back counteracting the awesome power of Lake Mead. This massive, but unseen, action squeezes the concrete arch together creating the mind-boggling strength of Hoover Dam. Read more about the construction of Hoover Dam.

 

http://www.arizona-leisure.com/hoover-dam-historic-photos.html

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Heading to Hoover Dam

[ Edited ]

KathyS wrote:

It's raining this morning, off and on, and what a great thing to hear on my wagon's canvas roof top to wake up to!  

 

and not to forget the coffee, something special this morning.....for each of you.....

 

 

 


What a treat for a holiday morning!  So hard to choose!  (My own was Green Mountain hazelnut French Press with a scoop of Vanilla Bean ice cream and a goodly dash of Bailey's Irish Cream creamer.  Just went for a second!)

 

French pressgreen mountain

http://www.baileyscreamers.com/about/

 

 

http://www.fishvegas.com/picture_library/phpslideshow.php?directory=.

 

Hope we have someone with us who is willing to clean the fish.  Looks like some good eating coming up.

 

"Despite low water levels, anglers still are catching plenty of striped bass at Lake Mead.'The glass that is Lake Mead is half full, and the fish have only half the glass to hide in, making for some of the best fishing for school size stripers in the United States,' said Mead fishing guide Mike Swartz. 'Lake Mead is the largest reservoir, by water volume, in the United States. At this time, it is 50 percent full. This is a staggering amount of water. The lake is currenty 480 feet deep and has 500 miles of shoreline available for fishing.'" 

 

http://www.fishvegas.com/pid8report.html  Also, see a vista of Lake Mead here.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Heading to Hoover Dam


Peppermill wrote:

KathyS wrote:

It's raining this morning, off and on, and what a great thing to hear on my wagon's canvas roof top to wake up to!  

 

and not to forget the coffee, something special this morning.....for each of you.....

 

 

 


What a treat for a holiday morning!  So hard to choose!  (My own was Green Mountain hazelnut French Press with a scoop of Vanilla Bean ice cream and a goodly dash of Bailey's Irish Cream creamer.  Just went for a second!)

 

French pressgreen mountain

http://www.baileyscreamers.com/about/

 

 

http://www.fishvegas.com/picture_library/phpslideshow.php?directory=.

 

Hope we have someone with us who is willing to clean the fish.  Looks like some good eating coming up.

 

"Despite low water levels, anglers still are catching plenty of striped bass at Lake Mead.'The glass that is Lake Mead is half full, and the fish have only half the glass to hide in, making for some of the best fishing for school size stripers in the United States,' said Mead fishing guide Mike Swartz. 'Lake Mead is the largest reservoir, by water volume, in the United States. At this time, it is 50 percent full. This is a staggering amount of water. The lake is currently 480 feet deep and has 500 miles of shoreline available for fishing.'" 

 

http://www.fishvegas.com/pid8report.html  Also, see a vista of Lake Mead here.



Yum, Baileys Irish cream...my favorite too! And ice cream on top!  Wow....Thanks for reminding me, I'm out of coffee beans, since I used them up at breakfast, and one of my favorite flavors of bean is the Irish cream.    Now, I gotta head to the local grocery/bate shop to pick up a few more things to go with that wonderful catch....looks like we have plenty of fish for dinner. 

 

I don't mind cleaning fish, though trout is my specialty.....but, you see one fish, you've seen them all!  Head, fins, scales and tails, and guts!  Oh yeah!

 

I think I'll rent a houseboat, just to relax on after fishing in that little rocky boat!  Okay, I've gotta get moving, it's already after 1:00!  See you back in camp, in an hour or so.  We can sit on the houseboat and tell fish stories tonight!

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Houseboat on Lake Mead

[ Edited ]

KathyS wrote:

Okay, I'm back.....and here we are: 

 

Got the houseboat, and cleaned the fish! 

 

 

Time for smoking fish:

 

 

I mean smoked fish!!!

 

 

Stuffed red bells with saffron rice. And I love onion rings! And time for a frosty cold beer by the fire!

 

 

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Houseboat on Lake Mead

LOL!  You outdid yourself again!  Glad I didn't watch while you gutted those fish, though!  I'll bait a hook and I have helped clean chickens as a teenager, but I'll leave that meat preparation to others these days, and stand in respect to the skill of others!

 

What a lovely sunset, with a tankard of ale!  Maybe if we are lucky, we will see a green flash as the sun sets:

 

 

green flash

 

I didn't even know these things occurred until watching an astronomy DVD today.  It would be more likely to have the conditions to see this where there was a flat horizon and a large body of water, like an ocean.  But, wanted to share my "new knowledge."

 

There is more here:

 

http://www.atoptics.co.uk/atoptics/gf1.htm

 

and here:

 

http://mintaka.sdsu.edu/GF/pictures.html

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Houseboat on Lake Mead

[ Edited ]

Peppermill wrote:

LOL!  You outdid yourself again!  Glad I didn't watch while you gutted those fish, though!  I'll bait a hook and I have helped clean chickens as a teenager, but I'll leave that meat preparation to others these days, and stand in respect to the skill of others!

 

What a lovely sunset, with a tankard of ale!  Maybe if we are lucky, we will see a green flash as the sun sets:

 

 

green flash

 

I didn't even know these things occurred until watching an astronomy DVD today.  It would be more likely to have the conditions to see this where there was a flat horizon and a large body of water, like an ocean.  But, wanted to share my "new knowledge."

 

There is more here:

 

http://www.atoptics.co.uk/atoptics/gf1.htm

 

and here:

 

http://mintaka.sdsu.edu/GF/pictures.html


Yes, gutting those fish was a bit messy, but worth it in the end. 

 

Pepper, Thanks for sharing your knowledge of these beautiful sunsets.  As many sunsets as I've seen, and taken pictures of, I don't ever recall hearing about, let alone seeing, these green or blue flashes.  Really impressive, and interesting!  I learned something today! :smileyhappy:

 

Now where shall we go tomorrow?  Any ideas?  I wonder if the rest of the group is going to show up and join us?   I think we should maybe start to head east, to where the autumn colors will be showing up in a few weeks.  Do you want to go through the south, or Midwest, or northern states? 

 

I'm just glad we weren't in Amsterdam, NY today, I hear they had a tornado!  And the rain seems relentless for all of you!   Stay dry! Our rain, today, wasn't predicted!  It was certainly nice, as it didn't rain hard at all,, just intermittent.  It stayed warm, though.  I went out for a while, and of course when I want it to rain on my car, and wash the dust off, it didn't!  Just streaked it with muddy lines!

 

Time to call it a night....have a good one...:smileyhappy:

Kathy

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Las Vegas - Houseboat on Lake Mead

Ssss.... just lost a post I had worked on for awhile with a stupid wrong mouse click! :smileymad:

 

As many sunsets as I've seen, and taken pictures of, I don't ever recall hearing about, let alone seeing, these green or blue flashes.  Really impressive, and interesting!  I learned something today! :smileyhappy:

 

We both did.  (Learned something new yesterday.)  I also have no recollection of encountering this lovely phenomenon until I was listening yesterday to the third lecture of "Understanding the Universe, an Introduction to Astronomy" 2nd ed., Professor Alex Filippenko, lecturer, California Institute of Technology, University of California, Berkeley.

 

http://www.thegreatcourses.com/tgc/courses/course_detail.aspx?cid=1810   (Our library system has a wonderful collection of these courses available for lending.)

 

Now where shall we go tomorrow?  Any ideas?  ...  I think we should maybe start to head east, to where the autumn colors will be showing up in a few weeks. 

 

While I do see the first traces of oranges and yellows here this week, let's visit Bryce and Zion, maybe Red Rocks, before we head East again?  While I am on this astronomy kick, I just discovered:

 

 

"Bryce Canyon National Park has a 7.4 limiting magnitude night sky! In most rural areas of the United States, 2500 stars can be seen on a clear night. At Bryce Canyon, 7500 stars can be seen twinkling in the void!?

 

http://www.nps.gov/brca/naturescience/index.htm

 

OOps -- the insert images feature doesn't seem to want to work for me right now!  :smileymad::smileysad:

 

Moutain Muse says Four Corners is interesting, but I don't know what is there.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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KathyS
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Brice Canyon, Utah


Peppermill wrote:

Ssss.... just lost a post I had worked on for awhile with a stupid wrong mouse click! :smileymad:

 

I'm sympathizing with your problem, but it gives Mickey a bad name!

 

 

As many sunsets as I've seen, and taken pictures of, I don't ever recall hearing about, let alone seeing, these green or blue flashes.  Really impressive, and interesting!  I learned something today! :smileyhappy:

 

We both did.  (Learned something new yesterday.)  I also have no recollection of encountering this lovely phenomenon until I was listening yesterday to the third lecture of "Understanding the Universe, an Introduction to Astronomy" 2nd ed., Professor Alex Filippenko, lecturer, California Institute of Technology, University of California, Berkeley.

 

http://www.thegreatcourses.com/tgc/courses/course_detail.aspx?cid=1810   (Our library system has a wonderful collection of these courses available for lending.)

 

While I do see the first traces of oranges and yellows here this week, let's visit Bryce and Zion, maybe Red Rocks, before we head East again?  While I am on this astronomy kick, I just discovered:  "Bryce Canyon National Park has a 7.4 limiting magnitude night sky! In most rural areas of the United States, 2500 stars can be seen on a clear night. At Bryce Canyon, 7500 stars can be seen twinkling in the void!?

 

http://www.nps.gov/brca/naturescience/index.htm

 

Moutain Muse says Four Corners is interesting, but I don't know what is there.


Since my folks were avid vacationers, I've seen all of these places, and because the Grand Canyon was the 'grandest', that's why I skipped over these other canyons, but if that's were you want to go, I see no reason why we can't.

 

Brice does have very interesting history of their rock formations.

 


 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Zion National Park, Utah

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Four Corners

 

 

The Four Corners is the only place in the United States where four states (Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado) come together at one place. Here a person can stand in four states at the same time.

 

The unique landmark is managed by the Navajo Nation and is open for visits from the public.

  • Admission $3.00 (all ages)
  • Open 7 am - 8 pm (June - Sept)
  • Open 8 am - 5 pm (Oct - May)
  • Four Corners Park: 928-871-6647

 

There is a small visitor center, which is open year round. It features a Demonstration Center with Native American artisans. Vendors sell handmade jewelry, crafts and traditional foods nearby. Self-contained toilets are available.

 

Four Corners can easily be visited while exploring the Monument Valley area, or as part of a Grand Circle trip including Arches, Canyonlands, Mesa Verde and other national parks.

The area is very remote. The tiny community of Teec Nos Pos, AZ, is six miles away and it has a gas station. The nearest communities offering a variety of lodging, restaurants and other services are shown below:

 

  • Shiprock, NM - 33 miles
  • Cortez, CO - 40 miles
  • Bluff, UT - 65 miles
  • Kayenta, AZ - 77 miles
  • Monument Valley - 100 miles

 

The original marker, erected in 1912, was a simple cement pad placed after government surveys showed the location of the terminus of the four state boundaries. The monument was refurbished in 1992 with a bronze disk embedded in granite. Each of the state boundaries radiate from the disk and each state's seal rests within that state's boundary.

The Four Corners Monument is located off US Highway 160. The area surrounding the monument is Native American land, which includes part of New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona and covers some 25,000 square miles. Both the Navajo, or Dine, and Ute people live in the Four Corners area. Artisans and craftsmen from both Indian nations are represented at the monument.

 

Many people who travel to Four Corners want to learn more about Native Americans, their cultures and ways of life. There is some opportunity to do that, by touring the visitor center and visiting with craftsmen at their booths. If you want a more extensive experience, we recommend you travel on to Monument Valley. Spend an hour or two at the Monument Valley Visitor Center and then let a Navajo guide take you on a tour of the valley. Native American guides can also take you on horseback trail rides, hikes, and Jeep excursions to other interesting areas.

 

This area has been home to native peoples for hundreds of years. Archaeologists have recorded numerous ancient Puebloan sites dating prior to AD 1300 throughout the Four Corners area.

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Four Corners

Loverley!  I just returned from an afternoon of errands out in this rain we continue to have here to find this lovely array of photos.

 

It is cold here.  What I need now is a roaring campfire:

 

"Comfort Fire

 

07-campfire"

"What if you could bring the comfort and warmth of a fireplace with you on your camping trip? Well, with the reflecting fire you can. "On a cold night you need more than just a simple tepee to keep you warm. You need something that will focus the heat directly at you. The problem with most campfires is that it throws heat off in all directions. A reflector fire lay solves this problem by replicating how a fireplace works. Fireplaces have a backdrop that reflects heat back towards the house. The reflector fire does the exact same thing.

 

"You can use any fire lay to make a reflector fire- tepee, log cabin, star fire, whatever. We’re just going to place the fire in front of a backdrop to reflect heat.

 

"Try to find a natural reflector to build your fire in front of. A cliff, larger boulder, or earthen bank will

work. If you can’t find a natural reflector, build your own by driving two hearty stakes into the ground at an angle in front of your fire. Against these slanted poles, stack up a row of logs from largest to smallest to form a backstop that will serve as the reflector. Use only green wood so it won’t burn.

 

"Now you can sit on your tree stump, eat s’mores, and enjoy the warmth and comfort of a fireplace out in Mother Nature."

 

Thanks to this location/writer for the above:  http://artofmanliness.com/2009/09/22/three-essential-campfires-snack-fire-cooking-fire-and-comfort-f...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCr4GrWhdI4&feature=related

Down by the beach.

 



"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce night sky

Bryce night sky

 

Here's a shot of that Bryce canyon night sky!

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon Formation and Map Link

[ Edited ]

"Bryce Canyon is not a 'real' canyon. It is not carved by flowing water. Water is the active ingredient here, but in the form of 'frost-wedging' and chemical weathering.

 

"For 200 days a year the temperature goes above and below freezing every day. During the day, melt water seeps into fractures only to freeze at night, expanding by 9%. Now as ice, it exerts a tremendous force (2,000-20,000 pounds per squarte inch). Over time this 'frost-wedging' shatters and pries rock apart. In addition, rain water, which is naturally acidic, slowly dissolves the limestone, rounding off edges and washing away debris."

 

http://www.nps.gov/brca/naturescience/geologicformations.htm

 

Bryce

 

 Map Link:

 http://www.nps.gov/pwr/customcf/apps/maps/showmap.cfm?alphacode=brca&parkname=Bryce%20Canyon%20Natio...



"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon

[ Edited ]

"Known for its colorful and oddly shaped rock spires called 'hoodoos,' the area was established as a national park in 1928. Each year over a million visitors from all over the world come to the park to marvel at its beautiful scenery and delicate formations, unique on planet earth. (Hoodoo is pronounced with a "haunting" tone and the "h" is silent - ooooo-dewww)"



From the National Park site: http://www.nps.gov/brca/index.htm

 

Bryce 2

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon -- Utah Prairie Dogs

[ Edited ]

Utah Prairie Dogs"Utah Prairie Dogs are tawny to reddish-brown in color, with short white-tipped tails and a black 'eyebrow' above each eye--a marking that distinguishes them from other prairie dog species. They are thought to be closely related to the White-tailed Prairie Dog....

 

"Unlike the Black-tailed Prairie Dogs of the Great Plains, Utah Prairie Dogs hibernate. ...

 

"Prairie dogs are among the most social of animals. They live together in large groups called colonies or towns....

 

"Within a larger colony there will be several subgroups, or 'coteries' as they are called. Coteries are based around a harem of females and one or more dominant males. Females born into a coterie almost always stay within that coterie, while males almost always leave their birth coterie to join another nearby....

 

"Prairie dogs once inhabited enormous areas of the western Great Plains. The first pioneers who crossed the short-grass prairies were astounded to find vast colonies of stout little rodents. They called the creatures 'prairie-dogs' and labeled their sprawling settlements 'towns.' One such town in Texas covered an estimated 25,000 square miles and was said to have 400 million inhabitants! Throughout the West, smaller colonies were found all the way to Canada. At that time, the total population of [all varieties of] prairie dogs was estimated to have been over 5 billion. The settlement of the West decimated these enormous populations....

 

"In 1973, the Utah Prairie Dog was listed as an endangered species on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife List of Threatened and Endangered Species. Conservation strategies included reintroducing them to Bryce Canyon National Park. Today nearly 200 animals live in the park, and comprise the largest protected population of Utah Prairie Dogs. In 1992, prairie dogs were trapped within the park, and transported to the Awapa Plateau to establish another viable colony. Recent successes have caused the Utah Prairie Dog status to be downlisted from endangered to threatened. However, populations still remain precariously low. It is hoped that more reintroduction's within the protection of Bryce Canyon's boundaries will help get the species off the Endangered Species list altogether."

 

http://www.nps.gov/brca/naturescience/upd.htm

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon Lodge

[ Edited ]

Bryce Canyon Lodge3

 

"The Bryce Canyon Lodge, constructed in multiple phases throughout the 1920s, is a National Landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the last of the original lodges, designed by Gilbert Stanley Underwood and built by the Utah Parks Company, to survive within the Grand Circle."

 

http://www.nps.gov/brca/naturescience/mountainlion.htm

 

(I don't know what the "Grand Circle" is.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon

[ Edited ]

Bryce Canyon trail ride

 

Early morning trail ride.

 

Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Someone spotted the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (endangered)

 

http://sbsc.wr.usgs.gov/cprs/research/projects/swwf/wifllook.asp

 

CondorAnd someone else, the also endangered and very rare California condor.

 

"Condor numbers dramatically declined in the 20th century....Eventually, a conservation plan was put in place by the United States government that led to the capture of all 22 remaining wild condors in 1987. These surviving birds were bred at the San Diego Wild Animal Park and the Los Angeles Zoo. Numbers rose through captive breeding and, beginning in 1991, condors have been reintroduced into the wild. The project is the most expensive species conservation project ever undertaken in the United States. The California Condor is one of the world's rarest bird species. As of April 2011, there are 394 condors known to be living, including 181 in the wild."

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Condor


 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon

Kathy -- thanks for the map showing the location and extent of Lake Mead.  It brought the scope of that lake home to me in a different way.

 

I have been looking for something comparable for Bryce Canyon, but haven't found anything yet, although I did link one map location.  But it doesn't really position the area in relation to the state boundaries, which I think is what I want to find.  (One of those "you'll know it when you see it" games.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon

Pepper, you've given me much to see on this trail drive, and I'm enjoying all of the wonders, and new and interesting information.  Everything from building fires, which I didn't know about, and the prairie dogs, and birds.  It's fun taking a trip with you, you find out so much about everything!  I hope you're enjoying it as much as I am.  :smileyhappy:

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Bryce Canyon


Peppermill wrote:

Kathy -- thanks for the map showing the location and extent of Lake Mead.  It brought the scope of that lake home to me in a different way.

 

I have been looking for something comparable for Bryce Canyon, but haven't found anything yet, although I did link one map location.  But it doesn't really position the area in relation to the state boundaries, which I think is what I want to find.  (One of those "you'll know it when you see it" games.)


 

 

 

 

Not sure if this helps, but it's as close as I could get to showing the relationships of the landmarks, within the state.