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Peppermill
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

Capitol Dome peak  From the State Capitol Dome: "The statue pays tribute to the Kansa Indians whom the state is named after, and to the state's pioneers. He points his bow to the North Star to symbolize the use of the star as a navigational tool."

 

There is a virtual tour of the Capitol here, but as far as I can tell, it is a pain to follow because you have to keep back-tracking to pick up the next leg of the tour.

 

There is an interesting collection of events depicted in murals by David Overmyer here.  The description below is from the one on the Chisholm Trail:

 

"After the Civil War the need for beef grew in the East. Cattle were plentiful in Texas, but there was no efficient way to transport them to market. Joseph G. McCoy established a shipping yard in Abilene in 1867 near where the Kansas Pacific Railway line. Jesse Chisholm laid out a trail from Texas to Abilene. Each spring from 1866-1885 cowboys drove longhorns from the Texas ranges to rail heads in Kansas or farther north. It took about a dozen cowboys to drive 2,000 head of cattle. Herd size ranged from around 1,000 head in the early years to 3,000 or 4,000 later on."

 

(The site linked on McCoy says of the Chisholm trail: "Abilene sat near the end of the Chisholm Trail ... established during the American Civil War for supplying the Confedate army."  Don't know enough history of the region or period to evaluate the validity of those origins of the trail.)

 

Historic Sketches Of The Cattle Trade Of The West And Southwest by Joseph McCoy

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

[ Edited ]

Kansas Factoids:

 

Kansas, a state in the central United States. Bordered by Nebraska, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Colorado. The geographic center of the United States, excluding Alaska and Hawaii, is in Smith County, Kansas.

 

Kansas is one of the nation's leading agricultural states and is sometimes called the “Breadbasket of the Nation.” Its economy, however, has become increasingly diversified, and manufacturing and services are now more important than agriculture. Kansas is known for sunflowers, vast fields of wheat, seemingly endless plains, and, historically, such frontier cattle towns as Dodge City and Abilene.

KansasKansas flagsunflower

 
 
Statehood: Jan. 29, 1861, the 34th state.
State abbreviations: Kans. or Kan. (traditional); KS (postal).
State capital: Topeka, since 1861. Earlier capitals were Fort Leavenworth (1854), Shawnee Mission (1854-1855), Pawnee (1855), and Lecompton (1855-1861).
State motto: Ad Astra per Aspera (To the Stars Through Difficulties).
Popular name: The Sunflower State.
State song: "Home on the Range." Words by Brewster Higley; music by Daniel Kelley.
Symbols of Kansas
State bird: Western meadowlark.
State flower: Native sunflower.
State tree: Cottonwood.
State flag and seal: Kansas's state flag, adopted in 1927, has the state seal centered above the word Kansas on a blue background. The state crest-a twisted blue and gold bar with a sunflower, the state flower, is above the state seal. The flag was modified in 1963. On the state seal, adopted in 1861, the rising sun represents the East, from where most Kansas settlers came. The 34 stars stand for Kansas as the 34th state. The farmer plowing and the settlers' cabin symbolized the future prosperity of the state through agriculture.
Land and climate
Area: 82,282 mi2 (213,110 km2), including 459 mi2 (1,189 km2) of inland water.
Elevation: Highest--Mount Sunflower, 4,039 ft (1,231 m) above sea level. Lowest--680 ft. (207 m) above sea level along the Verdigris River in Montgomery County.
Record high temperature: 121 °F (49 °C), at Fredonia on July 18, 1936, and near Alton on July 24, 1936.
Record low temperature: –40 °F (–40 °C), at Lebanon on Feb. 13, 1905.
Average July temperature: 78 °F (26 °C).
Average January temperature: 30 °F (–1 °C).
Average yearly precipitation: 27 in (69 cm).
People
Population: 2,688,418.
Rank among the states: 32nd.
Density: 33 persons per mi2 (13 per km2), U.S. average 78 per mi2 (30 per km2).
Distribution: 71 percent urban, 29 percent rural.
Largest cities in Kansas: Wichita (344,284); Overland Park (149,080); Kansas City (146,866); Topeka (122,377); Olathe (92,962); Lawrence (80,098).

cottonwood  Cottonwood Tree  (Site has picture of leaves and a photograph of a cluster in a winter scene with a lone bison,  These trees are a real blessing in this semi-arid country -- note the average annual precipitation of only 27 inches.  The leaves will be golden in the fall, much like the aspen or the alder.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Ryan_G
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

Welcome my friends to my adopted home state of Kansas.  There are, believe it or not some wonderful things to see here.

 

I"m so glad you guys decided to stop in Wichtia.  Let me show you around.

 

We will take a walk down the river front first as it heads south.

 



 

First thing I'll show you is The Keeper of the Plains statue that sits at the junction of the Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers.  It's a glorious site to see, especially at night.

 



 

The Keeper of the Plains is a 13.4 metres (44 ft) Cor-Ten steel sculpture by Kiowa-Comanche artist Blackbear Bosin. It sits at the confluence of the Arkansas andLittle Arkansas rivers in Wichita, Kansas. Surrounding the base of the statue are multiple displays which describe the local tribes that used to inhabit this area, as well as several fire pits which sometimes light up to illuminate the statue at night. The fire pits, which are known as the Rings of Fire, are lit manually for public safety and run in 15 minute increments. They are generally lit 2-3 times a night.

 

A profile image of this statue comprises the motif adopted by the 22nd Air Refueling Wing, a U.S. Air Force flying unit which is based at nearby McConnell Air Force Base. From 1993 through 2004, an image of the statue, along with the words "Keeper of the Plains," appeared on the tails of Boeing KC-135 air refueling tankers assigned to the 22nd ARW.

The sculpture, commissioned by the city and private organizations to mark the United States Bicentennial, was erected in 1974. It has since become one ofWichita's most recognized and beloved symbols. A spring/summer 2006 project elevated the sculpture on a 30-foot rock promontory so it could be seen from farther away.

 

You can see in the background of the picture of the Keeper is Exploration Place, a children's interactive science museum.  They have hosted some really cool traveling exhibits in the last few years including the Megaladon, the human bodu, and a humungous one about dinosaurs.





We will now continue our walk past Lawrence Dumont Statdium, the home ball park of The Wichita Wingnuts baseball team.





 

Right across the river is the Hyatt Regency wich has a wonderful waterfall area, kids aren't supposed to play in there, but they also do in the summer.





 

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

Now it's time to check out some of the statues that line Douglas Ave, our main east/west street that runs through downtown.  They were installed a few years ago and I love most of them.  I will run out of room to show you all of them, but here are some.

 





Georgia Gerber bronze Woolworth lunch counter

Georgia Gerber bronze sculpture and fountain along Douglas Avenue in Wichita

Georgia Gerber bronze statues

 









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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

How about we visit the museum district now.  The Wichita Art Museum has one of the largest collections of American art in the country and it has free admission on Saturdays.

 









 

Just down the road is Wichita Botanica Gardens

 









 

And two block away is The Old Cowtown Museum, a look back at the old west.

 





 



 



 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

Here are some randow pictures from around the city of Wichita.

 

This is the Tripodal statue that sets outside the Colosieum

 



 



Here is the main branch of our library system:

 



 

There are ligh columns set up at the intersection of Central & Mclean

 



 

Douglas Ave Bridge over the Arkansas River

 

Aerial photo of Douglas Avenue Bridge at night

 

Some pictures of Central Riverside Park (2 blocks from where I live.  I actually live within 8 blocks of everything I'm showing you)

 











 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

Thank you, Ryan!  You have been a delightful host and tour guide! 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

I thought we would venture out of Wichita a bit and see what else Kansas has to offer.

 

We will stop in Yoder and get one of the world famous Yoder Cinnamon Rolls.  They are homemade every day and they are so good.  





 

     In 1906, A.M. Switzer plotted the little town of Yoder as a central point for surrounding Amish communities. Today, Yoder is still considered to be that. Though many businesses and homes have moved in around Yoder, the picturesque town has stayed the same size.      With the emergence of new business, Yoder has prospered, inviting visitors to take a step back in time and enjoy Amish settlement. The town is a quaint mixture of the past and present, as horse buggies are intermingled with cars and trucks. Many businesses cater to the tourist trade, making it convenient to enjoy this wonderful Amish community.      Yoder welcomes its visitors to enjoy the simplicity of the past with comforts of the present. 

 

In Hutchinson we can go see the Kansas Cosmosphere Space Museum

 







The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center grew from a planetarium established on the Kansas State Fairgrounds in 1962. The 105,000-square-foot (9,800 m2) facility now houses the largest collection of Russian space artifacts outside of Moscow, and the second largest collection of space artifacts in the world, second only to the National Air and Space Museum.[1][2]

The Cosmosphere has four venues: The Hall of Space Museum, The Justice Planetarium, The Carey IMAX Dome Theatre, and Dr. Goddard's Lab, which is a live science presentation. The Cosmosphere also hosts a series of camps for children as young as those going into second grade, up to a camp designed for grandparents to attend with their grandchildren.

The only Smithsonian affiliate museum in Kansas, the Cosmosphere was voted one of the Eight Wonders of Kansas in a 2008 national poll.[3]

[edit]Collection

Included in the Cosmosphere's collection are an SR-71 Blackbird, the Liberty Bell 7 spacecraft from Mercury 4 and the Odyssey command module from Apollo 13, as well as Redstone and Titan II launch vehicles used in the Mercury and Gemini programs. A prized item on display is a moon rock from Apollo 11, the first manned mission to land on the moon.

The Cosmosphere is the only museum in the world that has both an authentic restored V-1 flying bomb and an authentic restored V-2 missile. It is also the only museum outside of Russia that has an authentic, flown Vostok capsule.

Nearly all of the vehicles, rockets, spacecraft, and spacesuits on display are either authentic or a "flight-ready backup," which is identical to the item actually flown: if a problem is detected in a spacecraft, rocket, or suit before it is flown, the backup fills in on the mission for the damaged item. The only replicated items in the Cosmosphere are the model of Glamorous Glennis, the Bell X-1 flown by Chuck Yeager, and the life-sized space shuttle replica that greets visitors.

The Cosmosphere museum begins with the earliest experiments in rocketry during the World War II era, explores through the Space Race and Cold War, and continues through modern times with the Space Shuttle and International Space Station.

Items on display

  • Liberty Bell 7Mercury spacecraft, recovered from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean
  • TheGemini Xspace capsule
  • TheApollo 13command moduleOdyssey
  • An actual Apollo White Room
  • ATitan IIrocket used in the Gemini program
  • A RussianVostokspace capsule
  • A replica of theX-1flown byChuck Yeager,Glamorous Glennis, used in the filming ofThe Right Stuff
  • An engine fromGlamorous Glennisflown by Yeager
  • AnX-15rocket engine
  • A U.S. Air ForceSR-71Blackbird reconnaissance plane
  • A backup version of theVanguard 1satellite
  • Moon rock collected duringApollo 11
  • AMercury-Redstonerocket
  • Restored versions of World War II V-1 and V-2 rockets
  • Prototype and space-flown American and Russian spacesuits
  • The largest meteorite ever found in the U.S.
  • A full-scale mock-up ofSpace ShuttleEndeavour(left side only)
  • A section from the Berlin Wall - last section removed
  • A Lunar Rover
  • A Lunar Module
  • Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Craft
  • A copy of the sphere-shaped Soviet pennant flown on Luna 2
  • Piece of tile from the Space ShuttleColumbiadisaster
  • A flight-ready backup forSputnik 1[4

 

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

 

In Abilene we can visit The Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

 



Eisenhower Family Home

Dwight D. Eisenhower statue

 

     All libraries in the system rely on foundations or other sources of funding for the resources needed for exhibits, programs, and events. In addition, beginning with the Bush Library, all new libraries are required by legislation to provide a twenty-percent endowment fund to support general maintenance of the facility.

  

     The Eisenhower Home was given to the Eisenhower Foundation following the death of Ida Eisenhower, the mother of Dwight D. Eisenhower, in 1946. One year later it opened to the public. In 1952, ground was broken for the Museum, which was completed in 1954. It was enlarged with a new wing and rededicated in 1971. The Eisenhower Presidential Library was completed in 1962, and opened to researchers four years later, in 1966. That same year the Place of Meditation was finished. The final building, the Visitors Center, was completed in 1975. In 1985, the large Statue of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, located between the Museum and Library was dedicated.

 

 The Eisenhower Center is a five-building complex on 22 acres of land, located in Abilene, Kansas, the hometown of Dwight D. Eisenhower. All buildings are constructed from native Kansas limestone. The massive glass entry to the Library is highlighted with bronze work, depicting a buffalo head and blue stem grass. Loreda Chiaro marble from Italy covers the walls, and the floors are Roman travertine trimmed with Breche d'Alep and Rouge Fleuri marble from France.

 

    Operated by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), a federal agency, the Eisenhower Center is governed by federal statue and related federal codes. All NARA presidential libraries are constructed with private and/or non-federal funds, then presented to NARA, which provides federal funding for operating expenses. NARA does not fund the design, fabrication, or installation of exhibits, or the production of public programs and events. These must be funded from resources outside the federal government.


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Ryan_G
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

On our last trip through Kansas, I think we should take in some of the more natural gifts the state has to offer.

 

The Flint Hills

 







 

Mushroom Rock State Park

 



 

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

Ryan -- what are the white pillar rocks that are shown on the site for the 150 year celebration?

 

http://ks150.kansas.gov/Pages/default.aspx

 

Thanks again for the wonderful tour.

 

Anyone playing with these links, I hope you spent a little time at the sunken riverboat museum with which Kathy and I opened this part of our trail drive.  It amazes me and I want to spend some more time exploring it.

 

 

http://www.suite101.com/content/arabia-steamboat-museum-in-kansas-city-a183275

 

http://www.1856.com/

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!

I'm not sure actually. I would assume they would be in the Flint HIlls region as I think that's about the only part of the state that would hav a feature like that.  It's very pretty!

 


Peppermill wrote:

Ryan -- what are the white pillar rocks that are shown on the site for the 150 year celebration?

 

http://ks150.kansas.gov/Pages/default.aspx

 

Thanks again for the wonderful tour.

 

Anyone playing with these links, I hope you spent a little time at the sunken riverboat museum with which Kathy and I opened this part of our trail drive.  It amazes me and I want to spend some more time exploring it.

 

 

http://www.suite101.com/content/arabia-steamboat-museum-in-kansas-city-a183275

 

http://www.1856.com/

 

 




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The Great Trail Drive - Flint Hills of Kansas

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Landscapes of Kansas

http://www.kssos.org/about/about_ks.html

 

 

The Chalk Pyramids and Monument Rocks in western Kansas

http://www.kansastravel.org/monumentrocks.htm

 

Monument Rocks are also known as Chalk Pyramids

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Peppermill
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Landscapes of Kansas

[ Edited ]

"Kansas Underground Salt Museum in Hutchinson, Kansas is unique in the western hemisphere. Although there are some similar salt mine museums in Europe, there are none in the Americas. And there are just 15 active salt mines in the United States."

 

Interesting trivia picked up in exploring off the links Kathy provided above -- after I got done exploring the limestone formations (there are lots of wonderful pictures), I headed for one of Kansas's other eight wonders, the Cosmosphere Museum in Hutchinson.  That's how I got to the salt mines.  Apparently the Cosmosphere has the largest collection in the United States of artifacts from Russian space craft -- looking back as I edit this, I see Ryan already told us that!

 

Rather fun to scan some of the restaurant pages for these Kansas towns!

 

http://www.kansastravel.org/monumentrocks.htm -- Repeat of the link from Kathy.

 

I did also go back and explore the Aruba Sidewheeler museum.  What a family story!  So many passions that people have!  To find a way to live out of those interests is fascinating to me.  (They are now looking for another buried boat.  Some of the stories are tied up in the Civil War as well as the Westward migrations.)

 

http://www.1856.com/



 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Kansas!


Ryan_G wrote:

Now it's time to check out some of the statues that line Douglas Ave, our main east/west street that runs through downtown.  They were installed a few years ago and I love most of them.  I will run out of room to show you all of them, but here are some.

 





Georgia Gerber bronze Woolworth lunch counter

Georgia Gerber bronze sculpture and fountain along Douglas Avenue in Wichita

Georgia Gerber bronze statues

 










Above are thumbnails from Ryan's posting of this fascinating collection of statues.

 

Is it time to move Eastwards again, perhaps to Missouri?  Think we could get Debbie to join us, at least in St. Louis?  Perhaps take us to hear her daughter sing in an opera, if she does that locally?

 

Or maybe Nancy (HarleyHoney) would suggest hopping up on Route 66?

 

US MidwestRoute 66 in Missouri

 

http://www.historic66.com/description/  -- Route 66 (old and new?) through various states

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: The Great Trail Drive - St. Louis Missouri

Peppermill wrote:

 

Is it time to move Eastwards again, perhaps to Missouri?  Think we could get Debbie to join us, at least in St. Louis?  Perhaps take us to hear her daughter sing in an opera, if she does that locally?

 

Or maybe Nancy (HarleyHoney) would suggest hopping up on Route 66?

 

__________________________________________________

 

St Louis, Missouri

http://explorestlouis.com/

 

 

http://explorestlouis.com/visit-explore/discover/25-things-to-do-in-st-louis/

 

Yes, I wish Debbie would give us a little low-down on this part of the country!  If the others want to explore their state, or other states, that would be great! 

 

I was crossing the Missouri River when I broke my wagon axle.

 

Had to take it into the shop and get a new one.

 

 

Had a visitor before I was able to get a lift across the river on a ferry....

 

 

 

Time for lunch... for everyone while I wait..Keeping it simple.....I found this cookbook at the General Store, so thought I'd give it a try...Biscuits and Beans, and coffee.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Missouri Symbols

[ Edited ]

Downy Hawthorn

Common name: Downy Hawthorn
An attractive, small native tree with a rounded habit. Showy white 1" flowers in clusters in late April-early May. One of the earliest hawthorns to flower. These, as well as other native hawthorn flowers represent the Missouri state flower. Blossoms are followed by showy, round, red (1/2 -1") fruits in late Aug.-Sept. which fall soon after. Crataegus is Greek for 'flowering thorn', and this beauty is somewhat variable in thorniness. Some are almost thornless. When present, the thorns are 2" long and slender. Bark is grayer than most hawthorns, and deeply fissured. Leaves are medium green and quite downy above and especially below, along the margins.Fall color is yellow to burgundy. One of the most commonly planted species of hawthorn in Missouri.

© 1999 WriteLine. Hawthorn Rose

 

State Flower:

Hawthorn

Missouri's State Flower actually grows on a tree. More than 75 species of the hawthorn are found throughout the state. The white hawthorn blossom was chosen as the State Flower in 1923.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 1998 WriteLine. Bluebird

 


State Bird:

Bluebird

The native bluebird was chosen as the State Bird in 1927 because it is known as a symbol of happiness and a friend to farmers. The bluebird is commonly found in Missouri from early spring until late November.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 1999 WriteLine. Dogwood tree
State Tree: Flowering Dogwood

The Flowering Dogwood became Missouri's State Tree in 1955. It's most beautiful in the Spring, when its pink and white flowers dazzle Missouri's landscapes and cityscapes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 1999 WriteLine. Missouri flag
State Flag:

Missouri's flag shows the State seal with 24 stars indicating Missouri as the 24th state to join the union. The circular seal in the center is divided in two: the right side shows the seal of the United States; the left side shows a moon, symbolizing Missouri as a new state and grizzly bears symbolizing courage. The center is a tribute to the United States with the motto, "United We Stand, Divided We Fall" set against the national colors of red, white and blue. The Roman numerals of 1820 indicate the date of the state constitution.

© 1999 WriteLine. Harry Truman
Famous Person: Harry S. Truman

"The buck stops here."

Harry Truman came from a similar background as Calvin Coolidge, but instead of a farm in Vermont, he came from a farm in Missouri. Both preferred their beloved homelands to the hectic political life of Washington. Both became president by the unexpected death of their predecessor and rose eminently to meet the challenge. And both surprised the political pundits of their day with their reelection victories. Truman's case was even more dramatic. His own party had an insider "dump Truman" campaign. His campaign song "I'm Just Wild About Harry," was mocked with "I'm Just Mild About Harry." But Truman took his message to the people in an aggressive "give 'em hell, Harry" whistle stop campaign that was ridiculed by the experts. The Chicago Tribune was so sure that the Republican candidate, Thomas Dewey, had the election in the bag, they printed their page one story early. "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN" the embarrassing headline shouted. In fact, Dewey, too, went to bed early, confident that he had won. When a reporter called the hotel to get Dewey's reaction, the front desk clerk said, "I'm sorry, the President is asleep." The reporter replied, "You better wake him up and tell him he's not President.

 

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Missouri Symbols

Haha, I liked that story about Truman/Dewey.

 

Enjoyed the rest of Kansas, as well!  Sorry I've not been around so much; I'm STILL trying to recover from being sick (now it's bronchitis).

 

We've been blessed to have a little bit of rain and some much cooler weather down here in Texas!

 

For now, I'm just riding along observing everyone...looking forward to seeing what we can find in Missouri!  Hope all are well!

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Re: The Great Trail Drive - Missouri Symbols


Camoena wrote:

Haha, I liked that story about Truman/Dewey.

 

Enjoyed the rest of Kansas, as well!  Sorry I've not been around so much; I'm STILL trying to recover from being sick (now it's bronchitis).

 

We've been blessed to have a little bit of rain and some much cooler weather down here in Texas!

 

For now, I'm just riding along observing everyone...looking forward to seeing what we can find in Missouri!  Hope all are well!


Sorry you're still not up to par!  This has gone on long enough!  :smileyhappy:

Glad to hear you got a little rain...better than nothing!  Our weather is starting to cool some, and hopefully fall will be following.

 

I was reading The Language of Flowers this weekend-----finishing it tonight....and  thought about the state flower of Missouri....and here I run into the blue bird again, this time it's the state bird!  Nothing like a cute little blue bird to make you smile. 

Feel better soon!