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Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

[ Edited ]

KathyS wrote:

 

Dulcie,

Sounds like you've got enough back-log to keep you busy reading into the next millennium!  My list isn't any shorter!  Ha! 

 

I've been enjoying reading Jamaica Inn, mainly because it's so different from what I've been reading of late, and to say easy is an understatement. 

 

I've been considering the next months LbW read,

Cranford   I don't know anything about this author, or her writing.  There seems to be many different publications of this book, with forwards, etc.  I'm going with the bare-boned $2.45 paperback version.  Can't beat the price!


Hi Kathy,

 

I didn't even list everything that I have on my backlog!  Lots of historical stuff, too (love reading about the Tudors and some others), and even some sci-fi.

 

Elizabeth Gaskell was a contemporary of Dickens and the Brontes.  She was a friend of Charlotte, and after Charlotte died, her father requested that Gaskell write her biography.  I had read that back when I was in college, but it hadn't really registered with me that she also wrote novels.  Then, over the past decade or two, I started seeing miniseries based on her books - Wives and Daughters, and North and South, and then finally Cranford, which was very popular.  So I started nominating her novels for the Lit by Women board, and since others had enjoyed the miniseries, they got selected, and we have already read Wives and Daughters and North and South.  She would write in serial form for the publications of the time, including Dickens' magazines.  I would say that her novels could be divided into two categories - novels of manners (a la Austen), and social novels (a la Dickens).  I expect Cranford to be of the manners variety.  I love British 19th century novels, and loved discovering this 'new' author!

 

So that gives you a brief summary, which may or may not encourage you to join us!

 

P.S.  As to the editions, I tend to go first for the B&N Classics, if available, then the Oxford World Classics, and if neither of those, then Norton Critical, if I can get it.  I had to do some searching to find the Oxford edition of Cranford, which was the one I linked to, so that's just why I chose that particular one.

 

Wives and Daughters 

 

North & South  

Cranford  

Return to Cranford  

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Cranford, by Elizabeth Gaskell

Thank you so much for this overview, Dulcie.  I hadn't taken the time to look into this author's history, you certainly know more than I do about these writers of this period!  I'm not a student of literature, never studying it in school.  What I learn is from all of you, and by reading these works.  I'll join this discussion, and can't wait to hear what all of you have to say!
dulcinea3 wrote:

KathyS wrote:

 

Dulcie,

Sounds like you've got enough back-log to keep you busy reading into the next millennium!  My list isn't any shorter!  Ha! 

 

I've been enjoying reading Jamaica Inn, mainly because it's so different from what I've been reading of late, and to say easy is an understatement. 

 

I've been considering the next months LbW read,

Cranford   I don't know anything about this author, or her writing.  There seems to be many different publications of this book, with forwards, etc.  I'm going with the bare-boned $2.45 paperback version.  Can't beat the price!


Hi Kathy,

 

I didn't even list everything that I have on my backlog!  Lots of historical stuff, too (love reading about the Tudors and some others), and even some sci-fi.

 

Elizabeth Gaskell was a contemporary of Dickens and the Brontes.  She was a friend of Charlotte, and after Charlotte died, her father requested that Gaskell write her biography.  I had read that back when I was in college, but it hadn't really registered with me that she also wrote novels.  Then, over the past decade or two, I started seeing miniseries based on her books - Wives and Daughters, and North and South, and then finally Cranford, which was very popular.  So I started nominating her novels for the Lit by Women board, and since others had enjoyed the miniseries, they got selected, and we have already read Wives and Daughters and North and South.  She would write in serial form for the publications of the time, including Dickens' magazines.  I would say that her novels could be divided into two categories - novels of manners (a la Austen), and social novels (a la Dickens).  I expect Cranford to be of the manners variety.  I love British 19th century novels, and loved discovering this 'new' author!

 

So that gives you a brief summary, which may or may not encourage you to join us!

 

P.S.  As to the editions, I tend to go first for the B&N Classics, if available, then the Oxford World Classics, and if neither of those, then Norton Critical, if I can get it.  I had to do some searching to find the Oxford edition of Cranford, which was the one I linked to, so that's just why I chose that particular one.

 

Wives and Daughters 

 

North & South  

Cranford  

Return to Cranford  


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

Finished

River Marked (Mercy Thompson Series #6)

  

 

 

excellent BTW and now on to

 

 

 

The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicles Series #2)

 

sometime this week as time allows.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

I recently finished The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Samaritan by Fred Venturini, and The Femals of the Species by Joyce Carol Oates

 

The Samaritan 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Female of the Species 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm getting ready to start on 31 Bond Street.

 

31 Bond Street 

 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?


Ryan_G wrote:

I recently finished The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Samaritan by Fred Venturini, and The Female of the Species by Joyce Carol Oates

 

The Samaritan 

 

 

  

The Female of the Species 

 

 

 

 

 I'm getting ready to start on 31 Bond Street.

 

31 Bond Street 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Anything on your mind, about these books?  What were they about....did you like them....dislike them....love them....hate them....?  Give us a hint, Ryan, as to why we should care whether you read them, or not, or whether we would like to read them, or not.  :smileyhappy:

Kathy

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

The Samaritan had to have been one of the strangest books I've read in a long time.  I actually made me feel old reading it.  The story was entertaining and horrifically compelling at times, but if there was a meaning behind it, I missed it.

 

I've never read Joyce Carol Oates before and I found her writing style to be a little much for me at times though two of the stories in this colleciton blew me away.

 

31 Bond Street was just flat out amazing.

 


KathyS wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

I recently finished The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Samaritan by Fred Venturini, and The Female of the Species by Joyce Carol Oates

 

The Samaritan 

 

 

  

The Female of the Species 

 

 

 

 

 I'm getting ready to start on 31 Bond Street.

 

31 Bond Street 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Anything on your mind, about these books?  What were they about....did you like them....dislike them....love them....hate them....?  Give us a hint, Ryan, as to why we should care whether you read them, or not, or whether we would like to read them, or not.  :smileyhappy:

Kathy


 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?


Ryan_G wrote:

 

I've never read Joyce Carol Oates before and I found her writing style to be a little much for me at times though two of the stories in this colleciton blew me away.

 


Many years ago I read Bellefleur by Oates and I recall that I liked it.  I think it was a multi-generational family saga with magic realism.  Some years later I read a collection of her short stories, rather macabre, and they were really terrible!  I'm pretty sure I got rid of the book.  I had had a difficult time identifying what it was, but I remembered the cover was a Goya print, and I did just find it:

 

 

"Grotesque" is right!!!  (This collection is not even listed in her wikipedia entry; I wonder why it's so obscure.)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

i think I almost picked that one up at a library sale but I can't remember why I didn't.  Maybe I already had too many books.  The Female of the Species was a collection of her stories that had previously been published in several mystery magazines.  they are all about women who kill for various reason and at least one of the stories could be classified as horror.  What I did like was, for the most part, the stories were unique and written in different styles.  Some of them I didn't like at all but the two of them that ended in the promise of violence, mere seconds before the even would happen, blew me away.  One was told from the viewpoint of a 6 year old girl.

 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

 

I've never read Joyce Carol Oates before and I found her writing style to be a little much for me at times though two of the stories in this colleciton blew me away.

 


Many years ago I read Bellefleur by Oates and I recall that I liked it.  I think it was a multi-generational family saga with magic realism.  Some years later I read a collection of her short stories, rather macabre, and they were really terrible!  I'm pretty sure I got rid of the book.  I had had a difficult time identifying what it was, but I remembered the cover was a Goya print, and I did just find it:

 

 

"Grotesque" is right!!!  (This collection is not even listed in her wikipedia entry; I wonder why it's so obscure.)


 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
LAX_observer
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎06-09-2011

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

I am currently reading the Hunger Games trilogy, which is great by the way. I'm the sort of person who's naturely skeptical of the "fashionable" books, because most of the hype surrounding them usually ends up being hogwash but I finally broke down and bought the series last week after reading the first book in-store for a week straight. I plan on reading the rest of the Apocalypse Dawn series this summer even though the second book isn't offered as an e-book quite yet, fingers crossed. I recently discovered James Rollins and his book Amazonia, which is fantastic by the way and plan on reading through some of his stand alone novels before jumping into one of his many series he's accomplished.

Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: What's on your book-shelf Mind for 2011?

LAX_observer, thanks for stopping by and telling us what's on your book-shelf mind.  Always good to hear what others are reading, and why.  I wish you happy reading of these authors.
KathyS.

LAX_observer wrote:

I am currently reading the Hunger Games trilogy, which is great by the way. I'm the sort of person who's naturely skeptical of the "fashionable" books, because most of the hype surrounding them usually ends up being hogwash but I finally broke down and bought the series last week after reading the first book in-store for a week straight. I plan on reading the rest of the Apocalypse Dawn series this summer even though the second book isn't offered as an e-book quite yet, fingers crossed. I recently discovered James Rollins and his book Amazonia, which is fantastic by the way and plan on reading through some of his stand alone novels before jumping into one of his many series he's accomplished.