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MissMandy
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

I was just reading in the newspaper this morning that they are trying to pass an ordinance in Cincinnati that will prohibit people from allowing their children to play in the street. I remember a day when every kid in my subdivision played kickball together in the street everyday and never once was anyone hurt. Those were the days when people weren't so rushed to get everywhere that they painstakingly looked out for kids in the street and slowed down. Nowadays, things are just different! I think going with the better safe than sorry approach is the best policy. I started to think yesterday, reading the first chapter, how this could happen to absolutely anyone! I can remember plenty of times I have turned too quickly into the parking lot at my daughter's school, rushing to pick her up to make sure she has time to eat before Karate practice, or having to slam on my brakes at a crosswalk because I am refereeing a fight in the backseat while trying to turn down the radio and not spill my coffee all at the same time. This book has, if nothing else made me think how much I would rather be 5 minutes late somewhere than feeling what Leigh and Kara are at this moment in the story.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


MissMandy wrote:
I feel alot of times as women, we are looked to as the person that will "fix" things - that will make it better - especially as a mother to her child. I think Leigh desperately wants to "fix" the situation as she felt compelled to do with the young man that she wrote to in jail. I think she is lost because she doesn't know what to do to make the situation right - not just with what Kara has done, but their whole overall relationship as mother/teenage daughter. I found it interesting that I could really relate to how Leigh was feeling, from wanting to be included, to being a little jealous that Kara was turning to her father, to even wondering to herself if she has somehow ruined her relationship with Kara as early as age 7 when she laughed at her in the mirror. I know if I had read this book as a young teenage girl in angst I would have related with Kara - annoyed almost by her mother trying to help, as she was annoyed when her mother tried to talk to her about sex. Now, as a mom, I feel I relate better with Leigh (at this point in the story) and I do seem to see her as a victim too and I find myself worrying about her more than Kara.


I understand what some of you are saying about a mother's need to "fix" things. But don't you get a feeling at this point that maybe thats part of why she is feeling left out of the family in the livingroom? That they know that rather than just feeling for the moment and being there emotionally for KARA, that she might start trying to "fix"? Maybe thats why Kara isnt that close to her and didn't run to her when she came in as she did her dad, as she could have both of them. Something about the way Leigh does or doesnt do things has distanced her. I could say, well maybe its something Kara did that distanced them but you don't get that in what you are reading so far and it doesnt play into how Leigh is feeling about the thing in general, the mother of the dead girl, the town. Does anyone get what I mean, what has me nervous about Leigh already? Or is it that, since I have never been a mother but I had one who, yeah, the best word for her was a "fixer", never got involved with me emotionally, she just wanted problems, any kind of problems to be "fixed and go away". Even when I became an adult and until a year and a half ago, my mom would sometimes talk like she really wanted to know things, be close to all of us kids, but if you ever told her any problem she just wanted to fix it and it was never your problem anymore, it was hers and ohhh what angst it gave her. She would even say stuff after she found out about problems, why did you tell me this if theres nothing I can do about it, now all it does is cause me problems, you have friends talk to them, I dont want to hear anyones problems anymore if they know its something I cant fix! She used that word.

Now she is the extreme granted, but what I am saying is that I get that twitchy feeling right now that Leigh does tend to see problems as hers and how shes going to handle it, even if she says we, or how will be looked upon if we do this or do that. I think this too is maybe why Kara doesnt want to talk to her about it. I think at this moment, Kara needs someone, like her dad, who will let her own this thing, even this horrible thing, because it is hers, it is about her and that if she talks to her mom, she will be giving that ownership away.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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kiakar
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy



MissMandy wrote:
I feel alot of times as women, we are looked to as the person that will "fix" things - that will make it better - especially as a mother to her child. I think Leigh desperately wants to "fix" the situation as she felt compelled to do with the young man that she wrote to in jail. I think she is lost because she doesn't know what to do to make the situation right - not just with what Kara has done, but their whole overall relationship as mother/teenage daughter. I found it interesting that I could really relate to how Leigh was feeling, from wanting to be included, to being a little jealous that Kara was turning to her father, to even wondering to herself if she has somehow ruined her relationship with Kara as early as age 7 when she laughed at her in the mirror. I know if I had read this book as a young teenage girl in angst I would have related with Kara - annoyed almost by her mother trying to help, as she was annoyed when her mother tried to talk to her about sex. Now, as a mom, I feel I relate better with Leigh (at this point in the story) and I do seem to see her as a victim too and I find myself worrying about her more than Kara.





You are so right, Miss Mandy. I love your wording. Women do feel more responsible I think to "fix things." But alot of things fall on women's shoulders or we let them fall on our shoulders by taking that extra responsibly for everything under the sun. ha.
I really feel Kara has to understand that her mother is a human being also and she has maade mistakes and will continue to make them. Kara has to mature alot more before she gets the concept of mother and daughter, its all done out of love but never seems to be earlier on.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


kiakar wrote:


I really feel Kara has to understand that her mother is a human being also and she has maade mistakes and will continue to make them. Kara has to mature alot more before she gets the concept of mother and daughter, its all done out of love but never seems to be earlier on.


Ahh, but maybe that goes both ways. Maybe Leigh needs to learn about mother/daughter relationships too.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Wrighty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


kiakar wrote:


MissMandy wrote:
I feel alot of times as women, we are looked to as the person that will "fix" things - that will make it better - especially as a mother to her child. I think Leigh desperately wants to "fix" the situation as she felt compelled to do with the young man that she wrote to in jail. I think she is lost because she doesn't know what to do to make the situation right - not just with what Kara has done, but their whole overall relationship as mother/teenage daughter. I found it interesting that I could really relate to how Leigh was feeling, from wanting to be included, to being a little jealous that Kara was turning to her father, to even wondering to herself if she has somehow ruined her relationship with Kara as early as age 7 when she laughed at her in the mirror. I know if I had read this book as a young teenage girl in angst I would have related with Kara - annoyed almost by her mother trying to help, as she was annoyed when her mother tried to talk to her about sex. Now, as a mom, I feel I relate better with Leigh (at this point in the story) and I do seem to see her as a victim too and I find myself worrying about her more than Kara.





You are so right, Miss Mandy. I love your wording. Women do feel more responsible I think to "fix things." But alot of things fall on women's shoulders or we let them fall on our shoulders by taking that extra responsibly for everything under the sun. ha.
I really feel Kara has to understand that her mother is a human being also and she has maade mistakes and will continue to make them. Kara has to mature alot more before she gets the concept of mother and daughter, its all done out of love but never seems to be earlier on.



These are all really good points. And so is the one that Viv brought up about Leigh feeling that this is her problem. From what I've read so far I get the impression that Leigh knows her role as a mother is to fix things and provide the comfort but I don't think she really knows how to do these things. She doesn't have any confidence and her family doesn't seem to have any confidence in her either. She acts like she's doing it because she has to, it's her expected role. She wants to do it well, to be the nurturer and the good mom but she seems more like the teen. She's unsure of herself, awkward and desperate to be liked by everyone - her own family and even Willow, Kara's friend (pg 80). She's had a hard enough time trying to relate to her daughter before but now she has a disaster to deal with and her family is shutting her out.
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kiakar
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy



Wrighty wrote:

kiakar wrote:


MissMandy wrote:
I feel alot of times as women, we are looked to as the person that will "fix" things - that will make it better - especially as a mother to her child. I think Leigh desperately wants to "fix" the situation as she felt compelled to do with the young man that she wrote to in jail. I think she is lost because she doesn't know what to do to make the situation right - not just with what Kara has done, but their whole overall relationship as mother/teenage daughter. I found it interesting that I could really relate to how Leigh was feeling, from wanting to be included, to being a little jealous that Kara was turning to her father, to even wondering to herself if she has somehow ruined her relationship with Kara as early as age 7 when she laughed at her in the mirror. I know if I had read this book as a young teenage girl in angst I would have related with Kara - annoyed almost by her mother trying to help, as she was annoyed when her mother tried to talk to her about sex. Now, as a mom, I feel I relate better with Leigh (at this point in the story) and I do seem to see her as a victim too and I find myself worrying about her more than Kara.





You are so right, Miss Mandy. I love your wording. Women do feel more responsible I think to "fix things." But alot of things fall on women's shoulders or we let them fall on our shoulders by taking that extra responsibly for everything under the sun. ha.
I really feel Kara has to understand that her mother is a human being also and she has maade mistakes and will continue to make them. Kara has to mature alot more before she gets the concept of mother and daughter, its all done out of love but never seems to be earlier on.



These are all really good points. And so is the one that Viv brought up about Leigh feeling that this is her problem. From what I've read so far I get the impression that Leigh knows her role as a mother is to fix things and provide the comfort but I don't think she really knows how to do these things. She doesn't have any confidence and her family doesn't seem to have any confidence in her either. She acts like she's doing it because she has to, it's her expected role. She wants to do it well, to be the nurturer and the good mom but she seems more like the teen. She's unsure of herself, awkward and desperate to be liked by everyone - her own family and even Willow, Kara's friend (pg 80). She's had a hard enough time trying to relate to her daughter before but now she has a disaster to deal with and her family is shutting her out.




You are so right, Wrighty. Somebody got to give alittle bit more in this story.
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MissMandy
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

Vivian,

I think what you are describing is the universal tug of war all women play with their mother :smileyhappy: You want her to be there for you but not necessarily make it about her or even DO anything, just listen. I am a mother and a daughter and I have a mother that feels she must fix things as well. It is annoying when I tell her about a fight with my boyfriend and she proceeds to butt in and tell me what and how I should deal with it, but it is comforting when I am upset about something one of my girls has done or said and she tells me exactly what to do and it works! As a mother I find myself also trying to fix things while also trying to teach my girls to be independant. Regardless, it is ALL done out of love, annoying as it may be. I think Leigh just feels helpless and she can't deal with it.
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MissMandy
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

If there is one thing my mother said that always annoyed the crap out of me but became SO SO SO true is: "You will never understand until you become a mom yourself". That might as well be written in the bible somewhere. There are some things we will never understand about our mothers until we become a mom! A mother's love for her child is a powerful, powerful thing. I agree that Kara just has alot of maturing to do and she recognizes that her mother will try to make this about her and maybe that is why she is standoffish. I do believe though, that Leigh, like most mothers would take Kara's place in an instant to save her the heartache and guilt she will endure.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


MissMandy wrote:
Vivian,

I think what you are describing is the universal tug of war all women play with their mother :smileyhappy: You want her to be there for you but not necessarily make it about her or even DO anything, just listen. I am a mother and a daughter and I have a mother that feels she must fix things as well. It is annoying when I tell her about a fight with my boyfriend and she proceeds to butt in and tell me what and how I should deal with it, but it is comforting when I am upset about something one of my girls has done or said and she tells me exactly what to do and it works! As a mother I find myself also trying to fix things while also trying to teach my girls to be independant. Regardless, it is ALL done out of love, annoying as it may be. I think Leigh just feels helpless and she can't deal with it.


With my mother, it goes beyond the universal :smileysad: with her, her FIRST thought and words are ok, now how does this affect me personally and what will everyone think of ME. Like I said, she takes ownership of anything you try to talk to her about and then tells you how terrible you are, selfish, for not thinking what it would do to her! As for fixing and like boyfriend/girlfriend stuff, back clear up into my college days,if I mentioned that a guy I was dating and I were having an argument or something, I didn't worry about it too much but I found out after the fact from two men who told me the exact same thing, she didnt try to get in it with us, she went behind my back and called them and told them I had asked her to call them and tell them to leave me alone and never talk to me again, to stay out of my life and that I just couldnt handle talking to them to tell them myself. When they didnt call back or I couldnt reach them, I figured it was the arguments and they must not have cared that much if they didnt call back or want to work it out but it hurt. When I finally found out about it and confronted her with it, she said well I dont want you to get hurt. I said I did, by you, what the hell were you thinking? The more we talked, she cant keep her mouth shut and she let it out, she said well if you got to close with them and got married, you would run off with them and then where will I BE! I dont want to grow old alone and your so selfish you dont even care! They will take you from me! I said look mother, no one can take me from anyone, I am stronger than that and you should know that. I said BUT YOU can take me from you. If you keep getting in my life like this, trying to stop my future so you know your old age is secure, YOU will take me from you and the day will come when I will walk away permanently. I said whose being the selfish one here? I said you have your husband thats who, or you will just find another, you always do. Plus you have 4 kids, its not like I am the only one here, I am not an only child, but I may be an only adult. This was in my early twenties, when I had been fending for myself since I was 16 anyway.

So what has happened over the years is nearly two years ago now, she did pretty much the same thing again but hurt me in more ways than I can't talk about here and so that was the last straw, I am 50 years old and I am not going to wait around for my mother to give me something she doesnt know how, and thats simply love, the bonds of a mother. So the last time she went completely out of control, the rest of the family has walked away from her long ago, the kids that is, which made me feel even more responsible for her, but we do not talk now at all. I told her, that was the one mother, I cant chase your love till the day you die at the expense of my own happiness and a panic disorder! Its not there. She said your right, we never did bond, none of us and I always knew that you would do this to me anyway. I said well maybe you need to check out the term "self fulfilling prophecy". And the funny thing is, for how worried I was about letting go of her, my anxiety disorder dropped noticeably within just weeks of not talking to her. She is the extreme yes, but Leigh's talk early on make the hairs on my neck stand up that this may be a mother who isnt a listener but someone who only sees things through her own eyes and how it will be seen about her. I like her, and I am loving reading about her but it makes me nervous lol :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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LauraMoriarty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

Hi all,
Thank you for your thoughtful comments on Leigh. She is a flawed, conflicted character even before the accident, but her sincere desire to be a good mother and human being make her a worthy heroine for me. Someone hit it right on the head earlier when they said Leigh has trouble with self-perception - she has an enormous blind spot when it comes to seeing herself, and how she relates to her daughter, clearly. I'll be interested to see how some of you think about Leigh as the novel continues and you learn more about her childhood. I was a social worker before I started writing, and one of the more heartbreaking things I saw in that profession was how even people who swore they would live their lives differently from dysfunctional parents often ended up repeating the same dynamic once they became parents themselves; it's as if the very quest to be different made them the same. I wanted Leigh to be a case study of how that could happen to even a very intelligent and sensitive woman - Leigh sees herself as being completely different from her own mother - and in some ways, she is. But in some ways, she's set up the same dynamic between herself and Kara. Leigh finds herself thinking the same things about her daughter that her own mother wounded her with years ago. But the things she's thinking are not untrue - Kara does have so much that Leigh would have loved to have had as a child. Leigh wanted security and safety for her children, and that's what she gave them, but the end result is a confident, happy daughter who Leigh doesn't feel she can relate to. The accident certainly upsets that dynamic, and it's up to Leigh to figure out if she can change it for good.


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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


LauraMoriarty wrote:
Leigh wanted security and safety for her children, and that's what she gave them, but the end result is a confident, happy daughter who Leigh doesn't feel she can relate to. The accident certainly upsets that dynamic, and it's up to Leigh to figure out if she can change it for good.


This is a very interesting idea that will be interesting to watch for as we go along. Isn't it strange when parents wanting happy successful kids, then can't relate to them and almost need them to fail so they can, even when failure is not what they want for them. What a quandery!
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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suetu
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

Well, I am very late joining the discussion, but I have finally begun reading the book. And, yes, I got sucked right in like everyone else. :smileyhappy:

Now I have all this baqck discussion to catch up on, and reading what's been said already I had so many thoughts that I can't even go back and write them all out. However, it is interesting to me, too, to see how this conversation breaks down among readers who are mothers and readers who aren't. I'm 38 and childless (very much by choice). Even though I'm much closer to Leigh's age, as I was reading the comments I kept thinking about my own releationship with my mother when I was roughly Kara's age.

That time from around my last semester of high school until when I left for college was the single most tempestuous time in my relationship with my parents. In my case, it was both parents. I was always a lot closer to my mom, and I didn't turn to my dad then, I just drew away from them both. I remember so clearly how I was struggling for independence at that time in my life, and trying to figure out who I was. And I was a really good girl, by the way, but I probably made my parent's lives miserable for those few months. It was one of the most difficult times in my life, and I'm sure my parents were utterly bewildered by me. And that's what I was thinking about as I observed Leigh's extreme insecurity in her family unit. I suspect many are the mothers of teenagers who are at a loss to understand what has happened to their child, their family. I haven't read enough about this family to know what their truth is yet, but I'm very interested to see where the story goes.
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suetu
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy



Stephanie wrote:
It is hard to predict how different people will react to a similar crisis – after an accident like this, responses from drivers and the victims of families are incredibly varied. Do you know anyone who has been affected by this kind of accident? How did he or she respond? Did this response make sense to you?




Oddly enough, the novel we were talking about a little in the other thread, The Almost Moon, had me really thinking about this story I heard second-hand from my mother...

There was this woman who was a friend of the family, but a generation older than me, so I don't know her. But anyway, a nice, professional, middle-class, soccer mom. One day she hits a pedestrian with her car and she just loses it. She panics. She runs. She leaves the injured victim and runs.

She was caught in no time and this otherwise perfectly law-abiding citizen goes to jail for a long time. A very tragic situation any way you look at it, and utterly indefensable behavior from this woman, but I could always understand that urge to panic. I don't know the lady, but I have sympathy for her. What a terrible mess she made of her life, and of course her actions have surely affected her whole family. That was years ago. I wonder if my mom knows what happened later?
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IBIS
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

That's so heartbreaking... how her life changed within seconds. One accident, one second panic, and another second of bad judgement call.

None of us really knows how we'll react in such extreme circumstances. Flannery O'Connor, one of my favorite writers wrote that we only truly meet our essential selves under such extreme circumstances....
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

When I put myself in Leigh's shoes, I actually felt a flutter of panic. I thought of my children, and how I would react if one of them were in Kara's shoes, and I felt ill. I know I would worry about the consequences for them, and for my husband and I as well- we are after all, pragmatic realists, and we would have to look at the financial aspects and think about our place in the community - how our child would be viewed/treated, how much of a burden it would be for the other child. I would expect my child to grieve - for the accident victim, and for himself/herself.

How does one live with that knowledge of having taken an innocent life, no matter how inadvertently? I would grieve for the deceased child and her family, but I would also be grieving for my own losses, and the losses of my family. The fact is, their lives will never be the same either. Not any of them- and no one is such a saint that s/he's only going to be thinking of someone else in a time like this.
Stephanie
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kiakar
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy



MissMandy wrote:
If there is one thing my mother said that always annoyed the crap out of me but became SO SO SO true is: "You will never understand until you become a mom yourself". That might as well be written in the bible somewhere. There are some things we will never understand about our mothers until we become a mom! A mother's love for her child is a powerful, powerful thing. I agree that Kara just has alot of maturing to do and she recognizes that her mother will try to make this about her and maybe that is why she is standoffish. I do believe though, that Leigh, like most mothers would take Kara's place in an instant to save her the heartache and guilt she will endure.




MissMandy; you are so right about this post; A mother will do anything to spare pain and suffering for their child. I will never forget my first child, my mother said if I could have it for you and suffer the pain I would. And when my children were suffering I wanted so much to care that burden for them.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


kiakar wrote:


MissMandy wrote:
If there is one thing my mother said that always annoyed the crap out of me but became SO SO SO true is: "You will never understand until you become a mom yourself". That might as well be written in the bible somewhere. There are some things we will never understand about our mothers until we become a mom! A mother's love for her child is a powerful, powerful thing. I agree that Kara just has alot of maturing to do and she recognizes that her mother will try to make this about her and maybe that is why she is standoffish. I do believe though, that Leigh, like most mothers would take Kara's place in an instant to save her the heartache and guilt she will endure.




MissMandy; you are so right about this post; A mother will do anything to spare pain and suffering for their child. I will never forget my first child, my mother said if I could have it for you and suffer the pain I would. And when my children were suffering I wanted so much to care that burden for them.


Some mothers. Those who know what a mother is.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Wrighty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


suetu wrote:
Well, I am very late joining the discussion, but I have finally begun reading the book. And, yes, I got sucked right in like everyone else. :smileyhappy:

Now I have all this baqck discussion to catch up on, and reading what's been said already I had so many thoughts that I can't even go back and write them all out. However, it is interesting to me, too, to see how this conversation breaks down among readers who are mothers and readers who aren't. I'm 38 and childless (very much by choice). Even though I'm much closer to Leigh's age, as I was reading the comments I kept thinking about my own releationship with my mother when I was roughly Kara's age.

That time from around my last semester of high school until when I left for college was the single most tempestuous time in my relationship with my parents. In my case, it was both parents. I was always a lot closer to my mom, and I didn't turn to my dad then, I just drew away from them both. I remember so clearly how I was struggling for independence at that time in my life, and trying to figure out who I was. And I was a really good girl, by the way, but I probably made my parent's lives miserable for those few months. It was one of the most difficult times in my life, and I'm sure my parents were utterly bewildered by me. And that's what I was thinking about as I observed Leigh's extreme insecurity in her family unit. I suspect many are the mothers of teenagers who are at a loss to understand what has happened to their child, their family. I haven't read enough about this family to know what their truth is yet, but I'm very interested to see where the story goes.



I have teenagers so I can relate to Leigh but I also remember those awkward years myself. I was a good girl too but you're right about the struggle for independence suetu. I thought I was such an adult but I was so wrong. No one could have told me that then though. Just like I can't tell my kids now. I was lucky enough to have a great mom who was very patient. She has set a good example for me as a parent.
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Wrighty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy


suetu wrote:


Stephanie wrote:
It is hard to predict how different people will react to a similar crisis – after an accident like this, responses from drivers and the victims of families are incredibly varied. Do you know anyone who has been affected by this kind of accident? How did he or she respond? Did this response make sense to you?




Oddly enough, the novel we were talking about a little in the other thread, The Almost Moon, had me really thinking about this story I heard second-hand from my mother...

There was this woman who was a friend of the family, but a generation older than me, so I don't know her. But anyway, a nice, professional, middle-class, soccer mom. One day she hits a pedestrian with her car and she just loses it. She panics. She runs. She leaves the injured victim and runs.

She was caught in no time and this otherwise perfectly law-abiding citizen goes to jail for a long time. A very tragic situation any way you look at it, and utterly indefensable behavior from this woman, but I could always understand that urge to panic. I don't know the lady, but I have sympathy for her. What a terrible mess she made of her life, and of course her actions have surely affected her whole family. That was years ago. I wonder if my mom knows what happened later?



A somewhat similar situation happened to my cousin this last winter. She was turning right at an intersection and was going very, very slow. As she turned she didn't notice an elderly woman in the crosswalk. It was beginning to get dark and she wasn't in front of her until she made the turn. She hit her with the front bumper and the woman went down hard. She was taken to the hospital immediately. Because of her age she was very fragile and broke her hip and pelvis. She went into a coma and my cousin was horrified by what had happened. It was a total accident but the results were awful. My cousin had to get a lawyer and couldn't discuss it with anyone. She could only ask about the woman's condition with her family. Even though they didn't threaten legal action she was afraid she would lose her house or even have to declare bankruptcy if they did. The woman died a month later from complications. My cousin wasn't charged but she was still afraid of legal action. I think only her insurance ended of paying any money to the family but the company then dropped her as a ccustomer. She fels so guilty about the whole accident and it happened in a split second.

We were saying before about different circumstances that can occur and cause an accident. We live in NY state and it's very rural here. animals often run into the road especially deer. Last week we had an animal cross in front of us and it startled us but we had plenty of time to slow down. What was the most shocking was that it wasn't a deer but a bear! That is the first time I have ever seen one in the road. I don't ever want to see it again either.
Author
LauraMoriarty
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎09-11-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Responding to tragedy

Wrighty,
I am so sorry to hear about your cousin. I don't think any of us can say we've never made a mistake while driving - she had the misfortune of having such a horrible consequence. I do believe what happened to her could have happened to anyone - I know it could have happened to me, and to think she is suffering with guilt is very sad. While going around and doing publicity for this book, I met several people who were found to be at fault in serious accidents. This happens to a lot of people - I suppose because cars are so much a part of our lives - and though talking with them and seeing their grief (not to mention spending a year writing a book about it) has made me a more careful driver, I still think it's most often a case of sad misfortune. Please give your cousin my best wishes, Laura


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